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    Palmaceae

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/11/2020 in all areas

  1. 12 points
    Just sharing some habitat photos of Bactris major in El Salvador. This is near a town called Jayaque. Really tasty fruit btw.
  2. 11 points
    I thought it was time to show off my Roystonea that has been growing in my Winter Springs yard. I am about 20 miles North of Downtown Orlando. I planted it as a small seedling in April 2001. So, it has been growing in my yard for nearly 19 years. It towers over my home. In 2018, what looked like a bloom started to emerge from where a frond had dropped away. But, after a few weeks, it too dropped away. But, I am hopeful that this tree will bloom and set seed soon. This tree is proof that once they get some size to them, Roystonea are remarkably hardy in Zone 9b.
  3. 8 points
    I just got this a few minutes ago from a guy who grew it in his apartment for about 20 years. He’s moving out of state and it needs to go in the ground so I’m giving it to someone who can plant it in the ground preferably in Palm Springs or similar area. Send me a PM if interested. Too big to ship local pickup. Palmy love to you all!
  4. 7 points
  5. 7 points
    Since I was out in the garden with the camera earlier this week, I snapped a couple of photos of the nicer of my two Dypsis ambositrae because I was so impressed with the great color contrast of the emergent spear and most recent petiole against the white leaf sheath and green leaves. What an attractive palm these are! The progressively closer look provided in this sequence.
  6. 7 points
    Since this topic came up here's the backyard jungle now.
  7. 6 points
  8. 6 points
    Inside jungle shot. Archontophoenix Beatriceae in foreground, with a Couple Chambeyronia enjoying the canopy behind, followed by a quad Cunninghamiana, 3 single Maximas and a triple Beatriceae
  9. 6 points
    It's doing great!
  10. 6 points
    37F and 1 other night at 39F. My coconut is doing well so far.
  11. 5 points
    Condolences to those on the East coast of Australia, the bushfires must be huge, as they have been making our skies very hazy, 3000km away. Since Monday however a change of wind has brought clear air from Southern ocean again. Took a drive to the adjacent coast today on a day off. This area is a solid 10a but is cooler than inland in the first half of summer especially. Photos taken in Raqlan, NZ. This and another Phoenix just out of sight had self seeded, I think. Definitely a self seeding, right against the fence, being allowed to grow for now, but days will be numbered for it. Huge Norfolk pines about 100 years old. They seem to be a 9A tree down here, plenty of large ones present well inland too. Queen and washies. Bananas stay green year round and fruit in this area (although not quite commercially viable) Row of CIDP planted 1923. Don't know what the thing on the right is but the leaves are about 60cm (2ft) long. A king palm and the much loved native Metrosideros excelsa in flower. An old Rhopalostylis sapida, showing how they tend to end up looking in gardens if have no shelter or shade. Some don't mind this look but I like them a little more open.
  12. 5 points
    Shaped...not barbered
  13. 5 points
    D. pulverulenta pops up everywhere in my arid-type garden. The larger ones are nestled among Sansevieria singularis while the bottom photo shows seedlngs along the edge
  14. 5 points
    Yes, lots of impressive specimens around. Raleigh has some great looking ones as well. These two are prime examples:
  15. 5 points
    I see lawn there. If worried about overcrowding just start removing lawn. You just need to mow the stuff all the time. Palms are such low maintenance.
  16. 5 points
  17. 5 points
    According to my wife palm trees attract halfwits which is very cruel, this is why I don't like her!
  18. 4 points
    My baby has been at my dads in zone 7a. Cold zone 7a for the winter where it has room to grow very tall and get a lot of light. It’s doing very well today is 12c very warm for January. With climate change it has gotten warmer and warmer every year. I sold my snowmobile this year due to this. Crazy for Canada. Here is a few pics of it outside and a video I made about the area
  19. 4 points
    I picked up some Pinanga speciosa yesterday and many were double trunked. Does this occur with this species? one or two Palmpedia photos seem to show twin-trunked specimens. The ones I purchased are about four to five feet tall. I also bought one single-trunked individual that has the same trunk color and leaf form. First photo shows double trunk with single trunk behind it. I will keep these under canopy for a year, but I'm hoping to be able to plant them in a place that gets half-day full South Florida summer sun eventually. Think that's doable?
  20. 4 points
    Here is mine now, my dogs tail beats it up daily.
  21. 4 points
    I love the coloring on the D. Ambositrae’s. Mine is not as far along as yours @Tracy. I can’t wait for the white powdery crown shaft. Mine actually just recently developed a second growing point. So I think as soon as the lowest leaf sheath comes off a second stem may be exposed. As far as it’s speed....I find it to be kind of average. I don’t find it to be real slow. You know, compared to some others. It’s much faster than a D. Decipiens for example, but much slower than a D. Leptocheilos. (Ya, I know I picked one of the fastest Dypsis and one of the slowest Dypsis, so I guess I left a pretty large window which doesn’t really narrow it down too much). Of course, the “speed of growth” I’m referring too is more about new leaf openings. As far as putting on some real size, that will have to be a wait and see for me. That very well may be slow for all I know. I do have two others in pots though and one of those is really putting on some size. So I stand by my “average speed” assessment.
  22. 4 points
    Does this look like the curled leaf type?
  23. 4 points
    We have 2 Chambeyronia Macrocarpa and 2 Chambeyronia Hookeri from 6 to 8 years old on our property in Lakewood Ca an they are my favorites. Always look forward to watching the new palm fronds open. pics from last week First two pics are the same Hookeri, planted on the north side of our house and it opens with a bright red frond. 3rd and 4th pics are another Hookeri planted in the middle of our backyard under two larger Dypsis Lepocheilost and one large Caryota Urens. It opens with a burgundy color frond . 5th pic is a Chambeyronia Macrocarpa and it opens in a bright red frond . Planted in the South East corner of our yard. 6th pic is another Chambeyronia Macrocarpa. Opens with a Burgundy frond and is planted with a garage on the south side of it and our house on the north side of it.
  24. 4 points
    Definitely shade for the Flamethrower! As far as how close is too close, there's no right answer and really depends on what you like. If you're concerned about overcrowding, the most important factor to consider is growth speed. Competing crowns look overcrowded but staggered heights, even for palms a few feet apart, can look very pleasing in my opinion.
  25. 4 points
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