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    Silas_Sancona

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/13/2019 in all areas

  1. 8 points
  2. 8 points
    My baby Pinanga caesia Seed courtesy of @NatureGirl
  3. 6 points
    Yesterday in a topic made in the main forum regarding concerns related to critters having access to the drain holes in potted palm / plant specimens, forum member @Gonzer made an excellent point, which, for one reason or another, isn't mentioned much.. but is a very valuable technique for helping to keep soil from slowly eroding from pots, and is a great way to keep out insects or other small animals which can get into the soil. Thought i might add to his point w/ some pictures.. While the topic was concerning Bees accessing the drain holes for a drink, here at least ..and in Florida, insects such as Ground dwelling Cockroaches, sometimes referred to as "Sand Roaches", several species of ground nesting Solitary bee species, some Beetles, Ants, and things like Sow or Pill Bugs can also enter. I have also found small Frogs/ Toads in some of my pots in the past when in Florida as well.. Black Widows also like such dark and moist spots, at least until bigger. We also have Bark Scorpions here in Arizona, yea.. not something you want to come across when re potting either.. While most of these don't really cause issues w/the plants themselves, their activity, overtime, can push soil in the bottoms of pots out of the drain holes which can cause root loss simply because there is now air where there once was soil for the roots to continue filling. Using some type of barrier, Screens in this case, those critters cant get in. If you're like me and make specific soil recipes for various stuff, you don't want to watch stuff like Turface, pumice, or grit wash out of the pots each time you soak stuff.. Technique is simple enough.. You can use scrap pieces of Shade Cloth, or thicker / heavier duty Window Screen.. Cut to a size just larger than the drain hole itself, place, then start filling with soil.. I've also used rocks large enough to sit over the drain hole but this can impede the flow of excess water out of the pot also. Using Screens, excess water flows away, soil stays in the pot where it belongs.. Shade cloth with detached strip i'll cut into six squares, the number of drain holes in this 3 gal pot. Insert over the inside of the drain holes. Use a finger to press into the hole. I also do the same for smaller pots.. 1gal, 4-6" Square pots, etc.. Just cut the cloth to different shapes.. In the case of the two different 1 gal pots, i will use the cloth disk for the pot on the left ( drain holes on the bottom ), and cut out squares for the pot on the right ( holes on the side of the pot ) Simple enough, and no more wondering who -else might be living down there.. Bees are fine, Scorpions, and /or Black Windows?, i'll pass thanks ..And i don't loose valuable soil.. Win Win..
  4. 6 points
    It's better to talk about it again next year.
  5. 5 points
    The ole Chambeyronia macrocarpa var. hookeri. A pretty fabulous palm. Tim
  6. 5 points
  7. 5 points
    Same here. No flowers on my less vigorous JD Anderson variety, which is 10 years older than my vigorous Lanceonada seeding version pictured here:
  8. 4 points
    Hi Brahea growers, these are my Franken babies about a year later. They are definitely starting to show some silver! (The first one from the left is B. aculeata for comparison) Regards Ondra
  9. 4 points
    Thought I'd post an update on this palm. It's fronds are getting larger and larger, thankfully I planted far enough away from the structure.......hope so anyway. Tim
  10. 4 points
  11. 4 points
    30% seems pretty low for fresh seed, I would expect >90%. I know he likes to use the baggy method but I find you run the risk of fungus. I'll just get a pot and fill it with a fast draining mix, pour the seeds on top and gently push them into the soil. Keep moist and probably throw them outside in the shade this time of year and within a couple weeks you should see some action. There are approximately 100 seedlings in each pot. At this point you can transplant whenever you feel like. I've done one pot's worth and am low on small pots because I completely underestimated how many I actually had.
  12. 4 points
    Here's what I have been growing as D. arenarum - but have always had my doubts. To me it is different than a D. lute - but whether D. arenarum I have no idea. I guess I will have to wait for the flowers, which should be coming soon.
  13. 4 points
    I use organic screening material from my Parajubaea Sunka Trunk. Works great:
  14. 4 points
    I recently started using fiberglass replacement window screen material. It is durable, flexible and can be cut with scissors.
  15. 4 points
    This is the inflorescence on my more vigorous growing one. I can't compare to my less vigorous plant because it still hasn't produced one yet.
  16. 4 points
    I had two forms growing in my old garden...The robust one was faster and more robust in every way. The smaller one threw nice colourful new leaves...you can see it in the centre of this photo...
  17. 4 points
    Alex, I raise bees and they are going after the moisture in the bottom of the pot. I see it all the time around the nursery, especially when it is dry/drought period. They seem to find a few favorite containers to get into and always go back to them. They will NOT hurt your palms. Take the duct tape off and give the bees a drink. They cannot make honey w/o water. Try placing a shallow dish of water around the area and see if they hit it. It has to be a type of dish that they can sit on the side and drink. They will not hurt you, they are just trying to feed. If the bees were not here, we would not be here. Save the bees.
  18. 4 points
    A few extra pics of Guaiacum coulteri ablaze.. and attracting all sorts of attention, including from neighborhood Hummingbirds, which was something unexpected i'd also noticed last year. As far as i know, ( and have read ) they are not considered a major pollinator of the species. Don't think i recall mention of Hummingbirds visiting the plant at all either in past research. While fragrant, you usually have to be up close to notice. This specimen is flowering heavily enough that i can stand a few feet back and easily detect the scent, esp. in the Morning. Can't decide whether or scent leans more fresh soap / detergent, or leans more Black Licorice. Pleasant regardless, at least to me. When first researching it years ago, there was little to no mention of fragrance in any of the literature i read through.. Always interesting what additional information can be learned about a plant as it is grown more. Overall look.. Somewhat spindly atm due to on-going training for height / form. Was also a little hungry coming out of winter this year also. If you look closely, on the far lower left corner of the picture, you can see part of my second- oldest specimen looking a lot greener / fuller atm. Fed this one back in early April and while nice and full foliage-wise, is lagging on putting out flowers. Just started training on it as well. Planning on bumping both to 25 gal containers next year. Flowers galore.. and plenty more to open.
  19. 4 points
    I sent these pics of a clustering Dypsis to Dr. John Dransfield last year for possible ID. His opinion was Dypsis arenarum. My seedlings had red new spears like Joe's picture, but they opened green. Note the waxy layer on the leaf undersides. Leaves arch noticeably, and the inner part of the leaf sheaths are brown or even red brown.
  20. 4 points
    Bit of color in new R. baueri cheesmanii leaf.
  21. 4 points
    Bonus Photo: Sabal palmetto Lisa
  22. 3 points
    Happens everytime!
  23. 3 points
    Upon purchase she will be dug, wrapped, and placed into the bed of your truck! This big girl is available for pick up only in Ft. Lauderdale, FL Asking $350
  24. 3 points
    I began germinating palm seeds in 2008 and started with various species of species of Sabals because they are easy for palm beginners. In 2009 I planted a variety of Sabal seedlings at the edge of the vacant lot to the east of ours to block the view of an abandoned house nearby (it was the height of the Great Recession and many homes in Cape Coral were abandoned). Today I took the following photos of these 11-year-old plantings. Sabals causiarum, domingensis and maritima have grown to be massive palms and most have been flowering for years. At one time I had each of them tagged but those tags are long lost so telling the large Sabals apart is difficult. Sabal palmetto is the smallest trunking Sabal and the specimens on Sabal Row look almost dwarfish compared to their massive cousins. None of the palmettos have flowered yet. Sabal Row, May 2019, Cape Coral, FL
  25. 3 points
    I posted this elsewhere, but inflo on my Butia paraguayensis x Parajubaea cocoides.



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