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  1. Eric in Orlando

    Eric in Orlando

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/13/2019 in all areas

  1. 12 points
    Took a look around the Christchurch Botanic Gardens' every increasing collection this morning, a beautiful early autumn morning around 57 (15C) degrees before a sunny 86 (30C) day.. Probably more suited to the Cold Hardy forum... but includes a number of 9b palms. Pretty good for 43 degrees south (similar to southern Ontario Canada). Having trouble resizing pics but will start with a few. and add more as we go. Nice stand of Nikau (both mainland and chatham island) Washies and big butia
  2. 10 points
  3. 10 points
    Dypsis decipiens? Looks like it's had a few transplant issues but is putting out nice big spear/s.
  4. 8 points
    This parajubaea is huge and very fast growing. Some other random shots.
  5. 8 points
    Variety of butia capitata, sabal, livistonia? parajubaea toryalli and cocoides
  6. 6 points
    If usability was not as important as just a cool plant, Ceratozamia euryphyllidia would be my favorite cycad. This was my holy grail plant for 20 years until Loran Whitelock became the first to make seedlings available in cultivation. His plants will never be bred again, so it is important for those who bought seedlings from him, to make more seeds and plants for others to use in future breeding. These plants will get 15 feet tall with leaflets even wider than they are now. Even when I sell all my cycads, these and a few others will stay. These plants are just gorgeous!
  7. 6 points
    Licuala ramsayi growing along the stream under Archontophoenix cunninghamiana at Leu Gardens.
  8. 5 points
    Quite impressed with this palm so far. I bought some C. Radicalis (trunking and non-trunking) on Jungle Music sale in mid-December. The palm has been on my radar for a while so I was unable to resist this deal. I decided, in an impatient bout, to plant it in the ground immediately (the winter had been mild thus far). As with all my new trees and shrubs, I inspect the root system and often do a thorough root-washing and root pruning (if needed) before I plant in native soil. I was horrified at seeing such a girdling, rock solid mass of woody material on this palm! There was almost no soil visible! This can't be healthy, I thought, and I took a sharp saw and just cut the bottom third of the root system off. I was then able to loosen the remaining root system and planted it in the ground. I later learned, and Phil confirmed this, that this practice probably wasn't the smartest idea with palms... Anyway, I monitored the palm closely from then on. As the outer leaves started to brown, there was no movement of the spears. Then, a few weeks ago, we had our polar vortex event on top of that! We got three subsequent days with freezing (+6 hrs/)night temperatures here in Texas. I protected the palm with a frost-cloth and some straw underneath. Today I noticed almost an inch of growth on the spears!!
  9. 5 points
    Triple trunk Howea forsteriana growing along the stream at Leu Gardens.
  10. 5 points
    Satakentia liukiuensis at Leu Gardens.
  11. 5 points
    Today's plantings under the much appreciated sunshine. Dypsis marojejy 'mad Fox' "
  12. 4 points
    Roustonea borinquena at Leu Gardens.
  13. 4 points
    That Ficus on Mizell is awesome, I have been watching it for several years now. I believe it is a Ficus altissima. There is a young specimen in Mead Gardens that is getting large. There is also one in Winter Park in Kraft Azalea Park on Lake Maitland and a good sized Ficus religiosa in that park. What is interesting is the F. religiosa survived the 1980s freezes with just canopy damage, the trunk survived. All other large Ficus around the Orlando area either froze back to the roots or died. I remember a bunch around. Most had severe damage after the 1st bad freeze in 12/83. There was a really big banyan south of downtown along Orange Ave. It was killed back to a stump. I took cuttings from in in 1993 and we have 2 banyans at Leu from this specimen, around 40ft tall now. There is a large Ficus macrophylla and F. aurea at Disney's Polynesian Resort, both planted in 1971 that survived intact . Also 2 big F. microcarpa at Sea World planted when it opened in 1973.
  14. 4 points
    With all the recent rain the weeds have taken over. Waiting for the weather to warm up before I even think about weeding. Here is a picture of an arenarius that stood out to me today. Maybe just because of all the green weeds around it. Can’t wait for the weather to warm up. It’s been an unusual winter this year.
  15. 4 points
    The weather has turned incredibly nice now, it certainly feels like spring with all the birds building nests and trees breaking dormancy. Here are a few of my palms on this nice, sunny day. Here are Brahea armata, bismarkia, Phoenix reclinata, beccariophoenix alfredii and a couple of others that are too young or small to point out.
  16. 3 points
    Did a tidy up of my neo, had him in the ground 4 years, been a very good grower, would love to see others
  17. 3 points
    Here's a Hemi I've had planted in the ground for several years.They survived a low of 28 F this past winter,unprotected,without a scratch! aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  18. 3 points
    Also got a couple Hemithrinax as these have proven themselves to be bullit proof under our conditions here in Arizona.I highly recommend adding these to a desert garden! aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  19. 3 points
    You know what, this thread gave me the idea of doing Florida's zone map as a video of a 30-year moving average, say, from 1960 onward. It would show how the zones have moved over time. One could do a screen shot of the most conservative map or the most liberal map.
  20. 3 points
    So beautiful!!! Eric, we just got a small Licuala ramsayi after seeing yours at Leu. There have been so many plants we have gotten after seeing they survived at Leu! Thanks for all your posts. It helps those of us who live in very similar climates as you.
  21. 3 points
    Go drip. You don't need spray. You can spray down with a hose a couple times in the summer just to wet everything down but for the most efficient water delivery you want drip. Just lay the tubing on the surface and cover with mulch. As long as you're using the proper filter, pressure regulators, and properly flush all your lines before initial operation you will not have any problems with clogged drippers. My system has been installed for 10 years now, and due to the steep slope, lots of drippers are burried and/or engulfed in roots, and I've never had a single dripper clog or stop working.
  22. 3 points
    Flowering Licuala spinosa growing in shallow water at Leu Gardens.
  23. 3 points
    Back to palms... fruiting Archontophoenix myolensis at Leu Gardens.
  24. 3 points
    A pinch of blush on a newer leaf of Asterogyne martiana P.S. Don't judge any brown tips! Just getting out of winter here and may have slacked a bit on the misting. Iguanura and Reinhardtia are NOT forgiving of such a sin..
  25. 3 points
    It seems like some palms yellow no matter what you do and any palm in the sun is more likely to yellow then the ones in the shade. What I do is I only fertilize in winter. I started this routine not because of some master genius plan, but because I only have drip irrigation and it became too much work to crawl around 1 acre on my hands and knees searching for every drip emitter to poke a hole and dump a handfull of fertilizer down - although that works really well if you have the time. So, since my soil/mulch is bone dry for the entire warm growing season I just started throwing fertilizer down once we were in full swing of winter and I could expect some rain to wash it in. I'm heavy on the ironite and the sul-po-mag, and occasionally I apply some palm fertilizer but my palms are big now so I really don't need them to grow fast, just to stay looking green. I think it works pretty good. Like I said, some palms you just can't help in winter no matter what you do.



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