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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/17/2021 in all areas

  1. 19 points
    When I saw this, I thought I was going to need a pacemaker. In all my years looking at palm parts and pieces, I have never seen anything quite like it. John Hovancsek and I were going through the garden when I removed an old leaf sheath off this Dypsis basilonga only to reveal the first spathe since planting. In this case, a picture is worth much more than a thousand words. Tim
  2. 15 points
    This is a Kim inspired thread after posting photos of her D. hovomantsina. More of an update than anything else after realizing just how robust some of these palms have grown. Dypsis carlsmithii. Planted out back in late 2009 from cones, I’m surprised they even survived as we were going back and forth to San Diego and they were on their own for months. Look for the shovel for scale. Tim
  3. 12 points
    2021 update. Getting really hard to get that shot now.
  4. 11 points
    I took these photos about 5 years ago. There are a lot of cipd’s in the are. But, to me, these CIPD’s are perhaps the most majestic that I’ve seen anywhere.
  5. 11 points
    It's been awhile since y'all have seen my garden pics. All the photos were taken in the early morning hours so the shadows are long and makes it seem darker than it really is.... enjoy.
  6. 11 points
  7. 10 points
    Feb 17, 2021: June 16, 2021: The fact that they need to be cut down after a few frosts each winter and then EXPLODE at the first sign of warmth will always get me excited for summer!
  8. 9 points
    Sorry for the low picture quality
  9. 9 points
    Saw this in Charleston. Looks like these palms the owner planted under their crape myrtle are getting much larger than anticipated lol. Or, maybe this was intentional. Either way, very cool
  10. 9 points
    My young, seed-grown Corymbia is finally coming of flowering age. Last year it gave me two flower umbels, but this year it's getting a lot more flowers. It also just shrugs off these 110-degree days. Combretum indicum is loving this heat also. Both growing in Fresno, CA.
  11. 9 points
    The last one for now. Dypsis ovobontsira. Beautiful palm, fast grower. Planted from a 15 gal. back in 2017. Nice white indument and overall habit. Gonna get big. Tim
  12. 9 points
    Dypsis robusta. Planted late 2011 from a 15 gal. Tim
  13. 9 points
  14. 8 points
    A beautiful species! For sharing, here are some photos in its natural environment
  15. 8 points
    Palms pushing green growth after 3F in Dallas. No protection june 2021
  16. 8 points
    Okay, so a little background, I started my palm growing addiction back a few years ago, circa 2004 probably. Began with growing a bunch of cold hardy specimens from seed purchased from RPS, including Jubaea chilensis. I sold all but one and kept it potted until I found a home I could put it in the ground, which was in 2015. In 2017 I decided where in the yard I would put some of my palms which included my potted Jubaea chilensis. Currently it seems very content in it's location, where it gets full afternoon sun. I fertilize at the same time as my other palms and gets watered when nature does the work along with some deep watering when it doesn't. Soil is standard Florida Sandy loam for th first coupk inches, turning to a tannish orange sand about six inches down. It is also planted on top of a hillside that transitions to a tidal creek/river. I know everyone says you can't grow this palm in Florida and those that have tried have failed. So I have questions for those that have tried and failed ... 1. How big was the palm when it died? 2. What are signs of it starting to decline? 3. Any other factors that might have contributed to it's demise? Jubaea chilensis 6/17/21 Jubaea chilensis 6/17/21 Jubaea chilensis 11/2017
  17. 7 points
    I don't have recent photos of my one remaining Aloe dichotoma so I'm posting these older ones. It looks pretty much the same but the branches are longer and it doesn't have such a bunched head. Apparently I lost my smaller one becuase some other nearby plants overwhelmed it and it rotted from winter rains. Don't even know how recently it rotted. Lost a lot of aloes. Anyway, this one must be in an ideal spot because it just grows and blooms like clockwork. Like I said in other posts, I don't go down there any more.
  18. 7 points
    I love it when my torch gingers start blooming
  19. 7 points
    Here are some Wodyetia bifurcata growing well in deep shade in my mom's neighborhood just west of downtown Orlando.
  20. 7 points
    Beccariophoenix alfreddii looking sharp. Consistent growers, low maintenance palm. Over 8 ft to the top now.
  21. 7 points
  22. 6 points
  23. 6 points
    Last week I found out that my unbelievably thoughtful husband bought us a trip to Ecuador for my birthday, and I’m beyond excited! We will have guided tours through the rainforest, (both during the day and at night) visiting the salt / clay cliffs where wild macaws and Amazon parrots are seen, touring local villages, and more. With how close to my heart the Amazon rainforest has always been, to put it bluntly, this is going to essentially be a spiritual experience for me. I’m admittedly not the greatest with knowing where some of the more obscure species of palms hail from. What species (I imagine a lot haha) are more notable from Ecuador? What should I keep an eye out to spot in their native habitat? We will be going to the outskirts of the rainforest around Tena, the high-elevation city of Quito, and also visiting Papallacta. After the trip, I will definitely be reporting back here with photos of what I was able to see!!
  24. 6 points
    Not my palms but definitely big boys
  25. 6 points
    Another update: We’ve got three little leaves! A fourth is popping out now as well.
  26. 6 points
    Last of the bunch.... thanks for looking! Preview attachment IMG-0675.JPGIMG-0675.JPG1.6 MB.webloc
  27. 6 points
    I transplanted this Majesty double that survived 5f unprotected. Found it in the dead palm garbage at the neighbor's house.
  28. 6 points
    Encephalartos nubimontanus just starting to push a flush on the main caudex, but also a number of pups or offsets are pushing new flushes. Sometimes with pups it pushes the main caudex off to an angle away from the pup growth. In this case, the numerous pups are completely encompassing the main caudex so they haven't had room to push it sideways. It remains hard to count the various flushes around this plant, but the vertical grey/green leaves with nice stacking coming off the main caudex certainly are attractive in my opinion.
  29. 5 points
    I do have some unusual palm species on our property and in our back yard jungle two of them are flowering and seeding for the first time. One is a lovely example of Cryosophila stauracantha, root spine palm, a fan palm from Central America. It is medium sized with silver-backed dark green leaves. My flowering specimen is about 7' tall and is flowering. This species is monoecious so I'm hoping to get viable seeds from it. Cryosophila stauracantha, Cape Coral, FL 2021 The second flowering palm in the jungle is Synechanthus fibrosus, a little known relative of the Chamaedoreas. And if you are a fan of cutesy monikers, this palm has two: monkey tail palm and jellybean palm (because of the shape of the seeds). Only 3 species make up this genus and unlike the Chamaedoreas they are monoecious. My little solitary Synechanthus is only 5-6' tall with a stem thinner than my forefinger. I'm hoping the seeds will be viable. Synechanthus fibrosus, Cape Coral, FL 2021
  30. 5 points
    Some of the other species, such as this P. succulentum, add a nice splash of color in the garden. This one's been in-ground for 15 years.
  31. 5 points
    Steve, here are a couple of shots. Tim
  32. 5 points
    When yew participate in threads like this…..
  33. 5 points
    When you have zone 11 palms in Orlando When you check Palmtalk 20 times per day When you make your own zone maps I could go on ...
  34. 5 points
    @NC_Palm_Enthusiast another example of queens living long enough to enjoy in 8b, love it. Thanks for sharing
  35. 5 points
    Thanks for reply aztopic. I have a few bigger ones that not sure of identification. The larger one with a trunk is supposed to be baileyana, the smaller trunked palm berteroana, one no trunk I am not sure of. The other is macroglossa I believe.
  36. 5 points
    Years ago (before I got sick) I planted a number of Encephalartos seedlings down on the hillside over on the undeveloped end of the lot. Well, I tried to venture down there this Spring (I only have one leg now) and to my surprise, a number of them were doing fine. Lots of weeds and Eucalyptus debris, but otherwise they looked pretty good. I lost some, but most of them seem to be doing fine. This little patch of three are E. ttrispinosus, E. arenarius, and E. longifolius. Originally they were just tiny 2-3 stem seedlings. Nearby is a E. cerinus which is doing just as well. Further over is a E. lehmannii which is doing well too. An E. nubimontanus is struggling and hasn't done much and so too an E. dyerianus. There were some others that I apparently lost because I couldn't seem to find them, but considering that they were completely neglected after the 2nd year is amazing.
  37. 5 points
    D. prestoniana. Planted late 2009 from 1gal. Look hard, there is a shovel leaning on the palm on the left. Just monsters. Only one photo, probably should take a couple more. Tim
  38. 5 points
    Dypsis betafaka? Blue decipiens? Not clear on this one. Again planted out in 2011 from a 1 gal. Looked scraggly for a long time, but getting more attractive as time goes by. Tim
  39. 5 points
    Dypsis mananjarensis. Planted late 2011 from a small 1 gal. Took awhile for this one to get it’s legs, but getting speedy, relatively speaking. Beautiful trunk and new red emergent petiole. Tim
  40. 4 points
    Nearly a week ago we took delivery of a new iMac, then transferred our stuff over from our old one. In the process there was a mix-up of photo formats and I discovered I had problems uploading photos, i.e., only links uploaded. Yesterday during an on-line training session with Apple we learned how to deal with photo formatting through our iPhones that take the photos. So, I took photos today and hope the site will upload these jpeg photos. This topic addresses differences in growth rates for an Areca catechu semi-dwarf and an A. catechu dwarf that were planted in the yard last fall. The semi-dwarf has grown about 6"-7" of trunk in the past 9 months. The last couple of leaf scars are 3" apart vs maybe 1" or less when it was potted. While the semi-dwarf form is less desirable than the extreme dwarfs, it is still a fine looking palm that shows some "scrunching" of its dark green leaves. Areca catechu 'Semi-Dwarf', Cape Coral, FL 2021 Below is my largest and most dwarfed Areca catechu. It really loves being in the ground, too, but has shown barely any trunk growth since last fall. Leaf scars are only fractions of an inch apart. Areca catechu 'Dwarf', Cape Coral, FL 2021
  41. 4 points
    The interest in palms is increasing, palms becoming popular both in the urban street greenery and in private green spaces. Trachies, Washies and marginal Chamaeropses is what I usually see in my 8A zone, the southern regions enjoy longer summers and shorter winters if there's any so they have wider options. I think dacties would be techncially a good option for Denov, I'm nearly sure I will find some more or less mature specimens when I visit that region in person. I have doubts, however, that there's any serious commercial potential because local markets are flooded now with cheap dates from Kerman province of Iran ($2 per kilo), and they are not that bad... Filibusta is definitely becoming the palm #2 here, shifting slowly bullet-proof and sustainable Trachies.
  42. 4 points
    I've posted this CIDP before but an update never hurt anybody right
  43. 4 points
    Managed to plant two more of this month's purchases. Got to make a new label for the Dypsis
  44. 4 points
    Clumps galore in my large garden .. was gifted a few divisions of hybrids and had some from good mates large flower farm . They grow so easily in my wet tropical climate .
  45. 4 points
    When you're trying to watch the College World Series (Hail State), you need to cook dinner, need to walk the dog, do laundry, take the trash out, etc etc But there's a nice breeze blowing and you just wanna sit outside and vibe with your palms.
  46. 4 points
    Not all ruins ,but they are now... The Casino/Railroad Depot The proprietor "Westmorland" ... And my Mom.. A couple of ladies that "worked" at the casino.. The interior of the Bar/Casino.. Death Valley Scotty eating lunch at Rhyolite.. Beatty Nevada...1940s... Same building 1934... Butch
  47. 4 points
    Just posting to say hello. I live in Central East Florida and I am pretty new to palms. I was bitten by the bug a little less than a year ago and find myself somewhat obsessed. I’m up to about 30 different palms, mostly small and about half are from seed Ive found in planters. Anyway, looking forward to soaking up some knowledge and meeting some fellow palmophiles! -Dean
  48. 4 points
    You are fine to use them as mulch. In fact, the sooner you use them the better it will likely be. The idea that they have a big influence acidifying the soil or draw nitrogen (as long as you don't till it into the soil) are myths that have been busted. Most university extension services are now also distributing this news. Find good sources on the web. :)
  49. 4 points
    Gorgeous pindo on the boulevard
  50. 4 points
    A sweltering June adventure - fortunately it was too hot for visitations from venomous reptiles.
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