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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/26/2022 in Posts

  1. 12 points
    Well. I took some 36 inch loppers and went to town on the front area. Hacked the roebelenii up a bit, and had to spank back 50 lbs of red button ginger stalks to make space. Went to put in the Chambeyronia and found I hadn’t moved them since winter. The 3 hookerii weren’t just a little rooted into the ground, they were bolted down by very deep, pencil thick roots that wouldn’t pull up. No wonder they were growing well in their pots. I kept one Macrocarpa in reserve. It didn’t root out like the others and has been slower. I got them up, severing a lot of big roots. I hope that doesn’t cause problems. They lost some arteries for sure. In went 2 (last years) Floribunda Hookerii and 1 from Carribean Palms Nursery locally all 3 gallons. I squeezed them in tight. About 2-3 feet apart. That’s all the space I had there, so hopefully that tight group won’t be too close. I’m using the roebelenii for a little sun protection, and they will have to be trimmed tight and perhaps will need to come out someday, but for now they make good nursemaids. Late afternoon sun is heavy in that spot. Hopefully they do well.
  2. 8 points
    I’ve got about 30 Chambeyronias in the ground, some getting close to 30 feet tall.
  3. 7 points
    I just planted two more hookerii from Floribunda too and that brings my total Flamethrower count to eleven.
  4. 6 points
    It’s one of the prettiest palms out there. Can’t have too many. Prove me wrong…. -dale
  5. 5 points
    Thanks, Everywhere I looked there were incredible things, like this huge Dypsis leucomalla, that feels like the softest suede: Suchin brought a sheath from leucomalla to use as a vase for orchids. Petting that soft fur on the sheath was like petting a therapy dog. The best for me was seeing the Hawaiian Lolu palm, Pritchardia viscosa from Kauai. There are only a handful of these palms - 4 known individuals maybe? in the wild and 15 at NTBG where they are growing them to be out planted. But look at these seeds on this giant viscosa that was collected decades ago. You really can see things here that are almost impossible in the wild.
  6. 4 points
    As promised, here are some more palm pics from the Floribunda class/tour: First up is Cyphosperma tanga, a remarkable looking palm native to the Fiji Islands: Then, there is Areca mandacannii a close relative of Areca catechu, the "betel nut", native to western New Guinea. The tree is hard to distinguish in the photo from things behind it, but notable in the photo are the huge fruits that turn orange when ripe. I was allowed to take three, and they are incredibly hard to clean, having a thick mat of tough hairs that I could only remove using a prying motion with a pair of pliers. Next is Neoveitchia brunnea, native to Vanuatu, where it is extremely rare and listed as "threatened" on the ICUN red list. Locals have called this species the "Devil Palm" and local folklore is that evil spirits invade the palm and make its fruits poisonous. However, the younger generations in the region are said to be largely unaware of and uninterested in these old legends. Next is Veillonia alba, native to New Caledonia. The correct name is now Cyphophoenix alba. The palm is noted for the red-brown felt on the crownshafts. Finally, here is a group of Borassodendron machadonis, native to southeast Asia. One feature of this species is the knifelike sharpness of the edges of the petioles that can easily cut the hands of anyone handling it carelessly. Mary Lock's fourth photo in the Travel section of Palm Talk shows a closeup of the two masses of huge black fruits shown in the photo above. That's all, folks.
  7. 3 points
    I don’t want to see anyone try to prove you wrong. I want to see pics that prove you right.
  8. 3 points
  9. 3 points
    Of your going for the jungle look like me then you’re good. I have a planting of 3 Chambeyronia that are all maybe only 18-24” apart from each other under Archontophoenix canopy.
  10. 3 points
    Just picked up a true fiji dwarf and red spicata man they look beautiful it does have a little spiraling white fly, I talked to the guy he even led me around his nursery and showed me his mature fijis and red spicata and gave me a huge discount for the drive and what now super nice guy his coconuts were gorgeous and super healthy.
  11. 3 points
    ... Looking really happy - B. fenestralis. Taking up speed - C. ponapense. Pushing spear after spear and beating the beetles therewith, too - D. album var. aureum. This one seems to be happier than usual, too - B. nickobarica. Same palm, newest leaf. Presented in the latest Okinawa garden update as well but I couldn't resist taking another picture - D. leptocheilos. Very common over here but their speed of growth is phenomenal - some sort of Chameodorea... I love the dark green color of the trunk. ...
  12. 2 points
    Yesterday was the hips (Hawaiian island palm society) tour. There were a lot of cameras so please add I only was able to take a few because I was working
  13. 2 points
    Hi there, five weeks of rain every day - palms are happy and so am I. If you want to enjoy some soaked images, please follow me... First shot from the second floor's balcony, looking down into the garden. View to the left, an A. alexandrae - which was attacked by rhinoceros beetles. Fortunately its speed of growth beats them all the time. Near the Alexander palm shown above, several pots of young hopefuls: Here a V. arecina... and a C. umbraculifera Planted out last fall and now obviously "connected" - L. riukiuensis. Probably enjoying the daily rain pretty much - C. macrocarpa. At the moment I think the most happy of all of my palms - C. samoense. Another "Chamby" - its newest leaf just turned from deep red to green. Understory - L. naumannii and... ...L. ramsayi. I love this "Hego fern" - not really home to this island but now seemingly feeling well. (I streched my legs for this shot since it is already 6ft/2m tall.) This ones leaves are getting bigger and bigger - definitely enjoying these warm and wet weeks, N. brunnea. ...
  14. 2 points
    They transplant well, but require good lifting equipment at that size (crane, not just a few strong people), and a truck to transport them. You are in summer now, so probably not the best time to do it, but doable if going into a cooler protected spot. The cooler time of the year is best. Get a decent size rootball and then water them like crazy once planted for quite a few weeks.
  15. 2 points
    Thank you again for the great info, I will find some and get it this weekend. Summerwinds by me has EB Stone and I've always wanted to go to Treeland, hope to one day.
  16. 2 points
    Nice, " California Sunset " is one of the suggested Cultivars for the area.. Several others from the same grower are supposed to be good here as well.. As far as grafting?, Some cultivars are better candidates for grafting than others.. ( PDF i mentioned details ease / difficulty of grafting various varieties listed ) My only issue w/ it is some veteran growers have shared concerns that the graft can actually weaken the plant over time... Something about the graft strangling the desired cultivar over time.. A few i had that were grafted were among the first to have issues. As far as Langbenite, you can find it for sale at some nurseries here in town, or online.. Down to Earth is one company that includes Langbenite in their product line. EB Stone, which might be harder to find here, also has a couple products that include it as well. Their SulPoMag is excellent for everything from Plumeria and Hibiscus, to Palms and any Cycads you might have. Down To Earth products can be found at Treeland in Gilbert, if you're in that general area.. Not sure about which nurseries would carry it on the west or far north side of town though. ** Btw, as a quick side note, no direct affiliation w/ either company, but have used products from both companies on my own for years and trust the results i have seen using them. As with anything else, individual results may vary.. ** Since my Royal Poinciana are seedlings atm, won't feed them w/ it until they're stepped into 1gals. ..But do use it on a couple other Delonix sp. i've been growing, as well as Guaiacum ( grow 2 sp. ) Adenium, Cacti, ..and everything else i'm growing. Should mention, one additional, potential benefit in using Greensand is it can help with moisture retention, which may benefit plants grown in containers. Down to Earth, and numerous other organic - based Fertilizer companies offer it in their product lines as well.
  17. 2 points
    ... Here a young C. nucifera under the umbrella of my largest E. guineensis. As already mentioned before - a bit cramped and in a more shadier spot but doing extremely well, B. alfredii. I guess super happy at the moment - my little C. metallica grove. This Sabal seems to explode - already 7ft tall and still no trunk. I hope this spot will be alright... Some (other) colors... A provisional seed bed that need to be taken of care of soon... Backside: I am so glad that these P. rupicola bounced back after being heavily attacked by the rhinoceros beetle. They are almost snapping for air (and growth) after some tough months last year. Shot from the outside - some A. merrillii - which can look pretty well when happy and an emerging L. chinensis plus a... ...very well doing C. nucifera - even in this somehow packed spot. Back on the 2nd floor's balcony were I just set up a shade spot since it went out of control indoors... Having no problem with the rain every day - P. hillebrandii and V. splendida... I guess these fellas love the rain the most - C. renda... and C. caudiculatus. Soaking it really in - R. elegans. Being flooded almost every day put looking healthier than before - D. album var. conjugatum. Finally... ...this D. manjarensis seedling. The picture doesn't do it justice - it looks almost variegated, but I have no idea if it really is. However, thank you for joining - best regards Lars
  18. 2 points
    If it is anything like the flowering Butia I have that throws 4 or 5 spathes each year... The male flowers typically open first, then pretty much all fall off before the female flowers are receptive. So the first spathe that opens (it is usually the only one open at the time) doesn't set fruit/seed (because there is no source of pollen nearby, including self). The next couple of spathes open overlapping, so there are male flowers present while there are receptive female flowers. These all are usually covered with wasps and bees that take care of fertilization, then these blooms produce copious amounts of fruit and fertile seed. If there is a straggler spathe that opens later when there are no other blooms open, it will also not set fruit, or very few fruit (thankfully because there is already sooo much fruit). If you really really want to be sure you get self fertilized seed... collect pollen from the first spathe that opens. You can then fertilize the receptive female flowers. It is a a bunch of effort, and depending on timing of the blooms and how long it holds on to male flowers you may not even have to. Also, really nice looking palm.
  19. 2 points
    Arriving at Floribunda on the bumpy Hawaiian Acres unpaved roads is an adventure. We learned a little bit about palm morphology, taxonomy, horticulture, and conservation by distribution. Jeff passed out a list of highlights that was 40 species long, and we kept finding things that weren't on the list! But this Sclerosperma mannii was. But this beautiful Licuala sp. did not! We learned a little about pollination with a demonstration on Borrassodendron machadonis. The smell of the male and female flowers was very musky bordering on nasty. We got to see some beautiful palms, most all of them in flower or fruit. Like this Geonoma atrovirens with a color like dinosaur kale. It was like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory when we got to go inside the green house! And everything was in flower or fruit. Like this crazy black flowers of Hyophorbe vaughnii below. So much random beauty: We were treated so nicely, Jeff and Suchin always had the Polaris nearby with a big cooler of water and soda, and even a cooler of beer. At the end of each session, there were pupu bento boxes waiting for us. If any of you reading this are beside yourself with envy, you might want to sign up for the IPS Hawaii Biennial because attendees will get to visit Floribunda in October 2022. Jeff and Suchin's garden will be a highlight among highlights. The Hawaii Island Palm Society can't wait to show you around!
  20. 1 point
    Previous owner didn’t know what species this was. Handled cold down to 24F with 30% leaf damage, with some leaves completely toasted and some untouched. I removed all of the old leaves after the new flush. Grey color is likely from overhead irrigation with well water. My uneducated guess would be C. circinalis. Any thoughts?
  21. 1 point
    Native Blue Banded Bee ( Amegilla ) in my garden today.
  22. 1 point
    A beautiful, bright and sunny 23c today in Perth, perfect weather after a very wet week. Looking for a sunny 24c tomorrow.
  23. 1 point
    We can only hope. I plan to trim the suckers on the patio side in the second photo to keep it growing away from the house. Hopefully one day I just can't see anything off my patio except a giant palm. Will keep the group updated with photos over time!
  24. 1 point
    Giving this a bump to see if anyone has any experience with Aloidendron ramosissimum in the ground? This puppy needs to come out of the pot soon or it will be cracking it.
  25. 1 point
    No idea. They’re mail order only so no visiting. I do know of some real nanus locally but they’re not for sale. Weird to see a Trachy under 18” flowering.
  26. 1 point
    Winged things from another local suburban Oasis. Gila Woodpecker, Melanerpes uroypegialis Male. Ladder-Backed Woodpecker, Dryobates scalaris playing hie and seek.. Black Phoebe, Sayornus nigricans one of our smaller Tyrant Flycatcher sp. Brown Headed Cowbird, Molothrus ater Male. Red - winged Blackbird, Ageliaus phoeniceus Male.. Gambel's Quail, Callipepla gambelii Male. Black necked Stilt, Himantopus mexicanus.. ...............Dragonflies: ...................... Western Pondhawk, Erythemis collocata Mexican Amberwing, Perithemis intensa Noid species.. Possibly a Meadowhawk, But could also be a Female Pondhawk.
  27. 1 point
    Some big Tipuana in Gilbert ( AZ ) Whitethorn Acacia, Vaclellia constricta. Gilbert Riparian Preserve ( GRP ) Dark green " Bush " in the back ground on the far right is a native Baccharis sp. Prosopis pubescens, Screwbean Mesquite. GRP
  28. 1 point
    The little Sabal in the ground is getting moved this weekend:
  29. 1 point
    As people mentioned, these grow to a massive size. I placed one on either end of my backyard property. I tried to upload a pano, but that wouldn’t work. So you’ll have to take the 3 pics as one to get an idea of how I placed mine. (The alfredi is in the corner if the 3rd pic) I’d give them quite a wide berth each.
  30. 1 point
    Bauhinia Macranthera- Chandler AZ It's a great desert tree! Drought tolerant, cold hardy, full western exposure (block wall), flowers profusely. Only flaw is that the limbs will snap during high winds.
  31. 1 point
    That’s really impressive…more so for not giving up…I’ve done the same with other plants, not even putting them in the dirt but in a shady, leaf mulch bed and a dogwood, in particular, rooted into the ground and recovered…it literally had newspaper over the rootball and leaf mulch underneath. Maybe it benefitted from the air transfer? Here in zone 7 I’d do the same as you with an ailing palm…too much care to just toss out. However, one needs to measure age of the planter with benefits of the planted…better be a fast grower in my zone or it’s curtains. Although, given that standard, my slow growing Brazoria is lucky to be alive today…in-ground 2014…spear pulled after harsh winter 2014/2015 and took weeks to show signs of life, but it did in late summer 2015 and has been a zone 7 trooper with a trunk ever since! Guess it sensed my displeasure…”better trunk up or I’m out of here”… Anyway, I’m with you…I won’t give up on the ones I have but it would be best if a Trachy was the one with the problems because a recovery would probably be much faster…Needles and Brazorias are not rapid recovery palms.
  32. 1 point
    I would agree that one of these looks like a P. sylvestris (Sylvester) and the other, more upright one looks like a P. dactylifera (true date). If you have been fertilizing the upright one, I might stop. P. dactylifera is famously cultivated in deserts all around the world because it needs almost no nutrients whatsoever to grow. I've never tried to fertilize one, but I wouldn't be certain of positive outcome if I did. I'm actually not aware of any P. dactylifera anywhere having a nutrient deficiency - a boron deficiency in a P. dactylifera almost sounds like a nitrogen deficiency in a Saguaro. It just doesn't happen that I am aware of (though I could certainly be wrong). You can grow them in like pH 9.5 inorganic sand made of crumbled old asphalt and concrete bits that is soaking wet and they do just fine. You could probably even irrigate them with saltwater. They definitely, however, don't like humidity and can easily contract fungal infections, as @Merlyn pointed out.
  33. 1 point
    Butia Yata growing at a steady pace.
  34. 1 point
    Don't know if Walmart is considered a "Big Box" store, but if you ever find yourself in Hilo, check out the plant nursery there. These Dwarf Areca catecu were selling for $39.
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    @palmfriend I love seeing palms in rain. Thank you for sharing these!
  37. 1 point
    LARS: You always post incredible photos. For me, the first photo from upstairs looking down is new. Here in Coronafornia, they have already issued water restrictions of 3 days a week and HEAVY FINES FOR VIOLATORS, so thank you for showing us what wet palms look like.
  38. 1 point
    Compost on top could work but remember it is digested so it will be gone in a couple years. I never put organic matter under a palm as the palm will drop, sit too deep, when its gone. With a little more turface in the top 3" of soil you can get a more uniform dry cycle top to bottom. Heavy clay does not breathe like turface so a 1:1 mix clay/turface should also include a some perlite or sand to rpevent the clay from gunking up water flow int he soil. Bottom line is you are in control of your dry cycle since rain is uncommon there. More clay means a longer dry cycle, more sand and/or perlite means a shorter dry cycle. The turface stays moist for quite a while, it offers the best control of the dry cycle, better than clay since drainage of clay is expected to be nonuniform due to potential for channeling of moisture.
  39. 1 point
    Yep. Plant it and step back. These get big quick. Great purchase. A tough palm too for areas that can get cool in winter. They do like a night cool down being from the Andes and all. If you stay above 20C (68F) at night for extended periods these can get upset and prone to rot away unexpectedly after doing great for so long. BTW, welcome to Palmtalk and our palmy craziness here.
  40. 1 point
    Plumeria can be tricky here, ..or so has been my experience.. When i first moved here, i had roughly 40 cultivars. Little by little id loose them ( In pots, in a west facing backyard. Likely cooked the roots, even though they were under shade cloth / trunks and outside of the pots white washed ) On the other hand, as i posted here, a neighbor has a large specimen growing against an east facing wall. Is in full bloom atm. Another neighbor around the corner planted one in full sun on the west side of their front yard.. Is pretty much a burnt out shell of stems waiting for a good wind storm to finish it off. As far as cuttings, the ones i'd tried, to save my potted plants, or start new ones, the cuttings would shrivel or end up rotting.. Only two of the 40-ish cultivars i had made it this far, ..a seedling - started specimen, and a cultivar named " My Valentine " survived. Moved the seedling started plant from where i'd had it planted at the old house, to the new yard here, and planted " My Valentine" in a spot tucked between two large Bougainvillea out back here that will shade it most of the day, but provide plenty of light. Idea is to allow it to grow up into sun, adding tougher wood as it ages. Funny thing is i stumbled upon a PDF a long time grower in California had put together listing 100's of different varieties ( Is posted here in the " Plumeria From Seed " thread, ..if you're interested in looking it over.. ** Is very long and detailed though, so it might take you a few days to pick from** ). Turns out, many i had were either too cold sensitive ( even to our minimally chilly winters ), heat sensitive ( at least where i'd had them.. ) or were poor / slow rooters, or cuttings had a tendency to shrivel or rot. " My Valentine " was one of the tougher cultivars. Decided to try and resurrect a collection again this year, starting w/ seed and cuttings of some cultivars that were listed in that PDF as easy to root, cold and/or reasonably heat tolerant ..and set seed ( Important for developing my own cultivars later ) We'll see how it goes.. Seed are also from selected cultivars that should meet the 3 main " requirements" listed above. W/ cuttings, i put them in a mix of Coconut Peat, Turface, and grit i collect from a wash.. Soak the pot once, then place in bright shade ..and don't soak again until they have a full set of new leaves. You can occasionally squirt the tips so that the " Claws " ( A Plumeria growers' term for the developing new leaves ) don't dry out / are able to push w/out sticking together. So far, all feel solid / no apparent shriveling, and are slowly moving a little.. Again, we'll see how it goes. Know they'll all be happier once we get to Monsoon Season. As far as a good, long lasting K source? Langbenite.. ( ..Or Greensand, ) is good, though the first product has a higher K %'age. Langbenite is a natural crystal form of Potassium that breaks down slower when watered, ..compared to chemical sources of K, ..so the plants can take up pulses of it when watered, or when it rains. I typically hit everything 3X's a year w/ it ..Once in April, again in July, ..then, as a sole feeding, ( ..only applying it rather then a fertilizer that also contains N and Phosphorus in it ) in October. Also use Kelp, and some other organics. Other stuff i use it on responds well, as did the Plumeria ..and my Adeniums. Agree, they, > Desert Rose < can be kind of tricky to get to flower for some reason. Had 3, but one of my prized specimens decided to rot a couple years ago. Luckily, i have another that i got around the same time and is hard to replace. 3rd was a spur of the moment purchase from a Big Box. Has yellow flowers, which was why i grabbed it, lol. In pots and bring them inside, and let them go fully dry/ dormant around mid- December. Been tempted to try one in the ground, specifically one of the cultivars developed by a Desert Rose Guru in Tucson.
  41. 1 point
    Thank you, I appreciate any help I can get, I want to see it bloom!!! I just fed it with some banana tea, I soaked a dozen banana peels for a few weeks and then added water and poured it at the base. I will give it some fish fertilizer next month and I gave it some last month. I never water it in the winter, the only water it gets is when it rains. I stop watering when I see the leaves dying in the fall. This Plumeria was my only bloomer last summer, but I have an inflo on one that's in a pot already this year. Six years ago I planted 30 seeds, of those I only have 6 left and they're doing well, but haven't ever bloomed. I give them Excaliber and fish fertilizer, I will look into things with High K as well, do you have any specifics? Good luck rooting your Plumeria, I can't seem to root them at all, but I've had really good luck germinating seeds (although they haven't bloomed for me either.) Just so you know, my yard is FULL of gorgeous flowers, I grow all types, but the only 2 things that don't bloom for me are my Royal Poinciana and Plumeria. Oops, I lied, Adenium don't bloom well for me either.
  42. 1 point
    I have previously thought that - if it is possible - a Bismarckia nobilis x Borassus aethiopium cross would make for an interesting specimen. If endowed with hybrid vigor, it would also likely be huge and grow 42ft per year. lol
  43. 1 point
    Hello! I just scored this cycad from FB market place. They said it was around 40 years old? It's been living in a pot the whole time. Thank you in advance! I think it's a dioon..
  44. 1 point
    That is absolutely gorgeous!!! It looks like mine isn't going to bloom again this spring, I'm so disappointed, but I still love it so much!! It's beautiful even without blooms. It's over 15 feet tall, it's hard to tell with my neighbor's massive pine tree dwarfing it.
  45. 1 point
    Here are some more pics from the tour. First up - many of us are familiar with Dypsis saintelucei and are growing in our gardens, but this big? Another gigantic specimen of something quite popular, but we are accustomed to smaller versions of Hydriastele beguinii, Obi Island form: In this pic, Jeff Marcus, proprietor of Floribunda and leading the tour, gives scale for a massive Dypsis leucomala. this species was formerly referred to as Dypsis "white petiole", but Dr. John Dransfield gave it a name a year or two ago. One of the most well-known and spectacular of the Madagascar palms is Lemurophoenix halleuxii. This specimen is so massive that, if I heard correctly, fallen fronds can only be removed by deploying equipment. Finally, on a more human scale, we have Jeff (with a can of human engine coolant in his hand) standing by a pair of exotically-colored Geonoma atrovirens: Enough for now. More later.
  46. 1 point
    Most people have seen this NC native Minor since I post it so often , but a few may not have seen it . So here is my favorite native Minor picture . The picture is showing a successful palm hunt by Gary Hollar , owner of Gary's Nursery in eastern NC . I think that is in Hyde County NC Will
  47. 1 point
    Cleaned it up a little.. but here is a pic..
  48. 1 point
    This thread disappeared too fast. John has posted some really great photos. I just got my photos (30 of them) captioned last night, now will add a few of them. First is Heterospathe califrons (the one in front is flowering at its base): Next up is Basselinia vestita, a New Caledonia species: Next, Dypsis marojejya, the "Madagascar foxtail", showing a beautiful new red leaf: John's seventh picture is of a pair of Sclerosperma mannii, although there has been some discussion of whether this is the right ID. The Sclerosperma is from western tropical Africa. My pic shows fruit developing near the base of one of the plants: Finally, a picture of the densely clumping Pinanga sp. "maroon crownshaft", from the Philippines. I will have more pics later.
  49. 1 point
    Forest Farm is selling 1 gallons for $39 via mail order. They are located in S OR. https://www.forestfarm.com/trachycarpus-nanus-trna100.html
  50. 1 point
    As soon as I saw Kim's post, I thought... "imagine if they were mislabeled as Triangle Palms and priced at $19.95." Ooh... Ryan



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