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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/15/2021 in Posts

  1. 30 points
    After all these years I finally made a visit to Dave’s Jardin de Palmas. WoW! Beautiful specimens. I picked up 6 palms While there (3 C Radicalis tree form, Spindle, A. Maxima, Dypsis Lafamanzanga). A few pictures. Thank you Dave! Pritchardia Jubaeopsis Cafra R Oleracea with Chamies to the left. R Regia - I think this one has the moniker of "Spanky" ala Our Gang Licaula Tri-Bear Watermelon Massive Panoramic view Dypsis among the Chambeyronia
  2. 30 points
    I badly wanted to cross the river to get some under canopy photos but couldn't face wet clothes for the long journey ahead. But finally I gave in and found a nice grove and went and got these photos. Jaw droppingly beautiful to be inside a grove like this with towering old Nikaus and their millions of offspring underneath. As observed / mentioned before - these have a very Howea Forsteriana look when under canopy.
  3. 22 points
    So I put in an order with Floribunda early in the month, and it came the other day 2-day shipping. Everyone arrived reasonably happy, being well packed and secured. The box weighed 70lbs and cost about $90 to ship. UPS made sure to drop-kick the package 600 times enroute, but still the palms arrived in decent shape from half way around the world. Yippie! Many of the Palms are potted in tiny, jagged lava rock stones. So I made sure, in my haste and excitement, to fling a bunch here and there, sporadically around my place. I managed to get a few right outside the doorway, so that they could greet the full weight of my bare heel as I take my first step out the door in bare feet. I’m sure they will forever be with me now. I got some B Alfredii.. Cyphophoenix elegans.... Chambeyronia macrocarpa and hookeri... this is the type of Palm-crack they send to get you hooked. Areca vestiaria reds... Ravenea hildebrandtii... Dypsis orange crush... and Dypsis lafazamanga sprouts... Wish me luck....
  4. 18 points
    I’ve got lots of palms closer to my house than that and I’ve never had a problem. Each palm has grown out slightly away from the wall and has cleared the eaves, barely.
  5. 16 points
    I’ll close with some companion plantings. Ravenala madagascariensis, Travelers (not really a) palm with a large tree fern. The very tall (40-50 ft) tree ferns give the whole place the feel of dinosaur habitat. Very few places in the developed world can grow these. Non-native tree ferns are controversial in Hawaii because of their potential to escape cultivation and become invasive weeds. But I love them. HTBG has a large collection of rare heliconias. Not many were blooming on this visit, but they are often spectacular. So on your next visit to the Big Island, be sure to see HTBG for yourself. Maybe you will catch a sunny day.
  6. 15 points
  7. 15 points
    I started these three rostratas from seed in 2014, at that point I was in the hunt for any cool looking plants that would survive in Tennessee. I had no idea if they would survive long term, but so far they have shown no winter damage over the years. Thought I would share some pics! The first pic is in 2015 when I planted them and the most recent is from last week.
  8. 15 points
  9. 14 points
    Very archontophoenix looking don't you think? If the crownshaft was a bit less bulbous and more elongated on these, they would easily pass for archies.
  10. 14 points
    Yeah, I'm partial to my own hybrids but this Billbergia 'Chewbacca' has really set the bar high. A leaf that exhibits Jekyll and Hyde characteristics of it's parents; Pink Champagne and Darth Vader.
  11. 14 points
    Last Sunday afternoon my husband decided to drop in on a Ft. Myers Palm Park, the one by the former railroad museum, to see what was up. Overall, the palms look okay but rather ungroomed, likely because of covid issues. But some of the palms were seeding and we scarfed some Copernicia baileyana and prunifera seeds that had escaped being cut down last year. We also saw a juvenile Corypha umbraculifera that is already well on its way to dominating the rest of the park. It is already larger than my Sabal causiarum. My husband immediately fell in love with it. But I don't plan on getting one. I already have a young Tahina spectabilis and one giant monocarpic palm is enough. My husband took the following photos of that choice Corypha. Corypha umbraculifera juvenile, Fort Myers, FL 2021
  12. 14 points
    I pulled one my five 15’ trunk Livistona Chinensis that looked the worst, and it was confirmed dead, but in the meantime thought I would plant several others, as I have two strong survivors that are pushing green. I got a little carried away and added quite a few more (I personally think they are very under appreciated if you want a slender trunk tropical-looking palm that is reasonably cold hardy) rather than just replacing. I also added several sabals and filifera after seeing how quickly they have started pushing green after the freeze in Central Texas. Overall, 28 new palms went in, and one confirmed dead came out, with two Livistona Chinensis survival TBD. If they don’t make it, I’ll deal with it later, but I couldn’t pull them without giving them a few more months. I had been waiting for an excuse to add palm to the front of the house, so I added quite a few there as well. I’m sure the neighbors think I’m crazy considering the crane and all, but they’ve been very complimentary so far!
  13. 13 points
    Not wild,although they have naturalized here,I have 3 new lovebird babies.The parents build their nest by shredding palm fronds that I put into their enclosure. aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  14. 13 points
    Here's some photos of Nikau / Rhopalostylis Sapida (mainland variety) in habitat, in the Waioeka Gorge, New Zealand. I was there today and yesterday. These photos were taken across two days, and two different travel directions, and with three different cameras (phone, drone and digital SLR) so there'll be a bit of crossover and mix up as well as variance in lighting and shade. By the way - for those not familiar - Waioeka isn't the only place in NZ to see Nikau in habitat in this way, it is just a very good example of typical NZ subtropical rainforest and terrain. The palms are the quintessential mainland variety of Rhopalostylis Sapida. I do love the Chatham/Pitt variety for its vigour and slightly more dramatic appearance, but you can't beat the iconic mainland Nikau right at home in its own habitat where it looks its best. Here's the start of the gorge, it gets a lot more steep and rugged the further in you go until you're surrounded by steep, nikau clad cliffs.
  15. 13 points
    The river is great for trout fishing but sadly I didn't have time... :-(
  16. 13 points
    SpaceX launch tonight with a palmy view.
  17. 13 points
  18. 13 points
    Maybe Areca catechu alba Orange Areca vesteria. These are pretty high. Used a telephoto lens to get a closeup. Red Areca vesteria Cyrtostachys renda. Again, these are on the tall side. Camera is pointing up. A recently added Neoveitchia storckii A group of Normanbya normanbyi A small Johannesteijsmannia altrifons
  19. 12 points
    I spotted this one which recently had a couple of fronds snapped off, perhaps by a falling branch or something, I thought the leaf form in the sunlight like that was absolutely awesome.
  20. 11 points
  21. 11 points
    Hi everyone, I noticed something yesterday in my garden which let me dive into my files - here we go: Being super-happy about my first good looking Archontophoenix alexandrae in May2015. (Seeds were ordered in fall 2014, I guess). October, same year - with an impressive speed of growth , already replanted in larger pots. One year later, Oct. 2016, planted out in spring of that year - already starting to trunk. May 2017, completely trouble-free growing, definitely getting some seize on. Sept.2019, we got hit quite hard by some typhoons during that year - but there was no reason to be worried, they looked damaged but always showed signs of recovering immediately. Again a year later, last fall in 2020 - no typhoons at all let them almost explode. On a sunny day in January - always nice to look at. Very common in other parts of the world, but I like them. Noticing a dropped leaf yesterday let me glance around for some damage on other smaller plants close by... ...looking up to check the trunk for a possible bug attack - which has already happened on this one but it grew out of it without any problems - walking slowly around and getting the sun in front... ...Oh la la - what a nice suprise! The first flowering attempt - which might not be successful but the palm has definitely reached the next stage of its growth. Thank you for your time - best regards from Miyako island/Okinawa Lars
  22. 11 points
    Spotted this big Hedyscepe in Auckland last week. This is the largest I've ever seen in New Zealand.
  23. 11 points
    I got this palm from Jeff Searle while on a 24 hour layover in Fort Lauderdale. Was a 1 gallon in 2006’ish. Has always done very well. This one is just a tad shy of 2’. I know of one in Laguna Beach that is about 6 of trunk. No telling how old that one is. Any So Cal growers have this? JW
  24. 11 points
    I was taking photos in the back yard jungle a couple days ago. The following planted/potted palms were ready for their closeups: Syagrus schizophylla - The only Syagrus with spines, I think. Very slow growing compared to queens. I grew this specimen from seeds I found under a display at my local orange BB about 10 years ago. It was unfazed by fusarium wilt that destroyed all my queens, mules and Washy. Ptychosperma sp - Solitary, skinny little palm with huge ruffled leaves. New leaves open bronze-y red, then turn dark green. Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti - This species cannot tolerate my alkaline soil and dies within weeks of being planted. So, I grew these from seeds started 10 years ago and they live their lives in pots. Those stems are thinner than my forefinger.
  25. 11 points
    I am back in Virginia for a few more years. Here are some unusual palms that I have grown for many years that are now in my new yard. My soil is mostly sandy with some loam, and fairly moist for sandy soil. Inground I have chamaedorea microspadix, jubaea, parajubaea sunkha, mule, serenoa, and needle palms. I have a lot of other hybrids in pots and unusual species for this far north. I've had many of them for 20 years, but mostly in pots. I didn't even need to protect most of them this last winter, since it didn't drop below 23 F, which is unheard of for here. I will probably plant some chamaedorea radicalis soon. The Jubaea was sold to me as a hybrid, which it is not. It is over 10 years old and about 7 feet wide. The sunkha is about 6.5 feet tall. The mule is around 9 or so feet tall. God bless
  26. 11 points
    Edge of the Archontophoenix forest. A quartet of Pigafetta that are probably close to 100 ft (30m) tall. The crowns of fronds are quite large. They only look tiny because they are so high. Not far behind is a trio of Veitchia joannis that are maybe 80 ft (25m) high. Dan Lutkenhouse Sr. apparently loved Licuala grandis more than just about anything else. Dozens are growing in the garden. They resemble Sabinaria but without the slit dividing the circular fronds. I didn't see many other Licuala species in the collection. Another unlabeled Licuala. Kerridoxa elegans is about 12 ft (4 m) tall. I think this is a Corypha. The fronds are about 8-10 ft (3 m) in diameter. It is planted away from the trail, so it hard to get a clear photo.
  27. 11 points
    There is a small grove of maybe half dozen Phoenicophorium borsigianum around a lily pond. These are about 30 feet (10 m) tall. I don’t know where else you could find trees of this size outside the Seychelles. Another Seychelles favorite is Verschaffeltia splendida, probably over 40 ft (13m) tall. Once they get really tall, the entire leaves get torn by the wind. Finishing up the Seychelles species with Deckenia nobilis. The sheath holding the developing inflorescence always reminds me of Audrey 2 from Little Shop of Horrors. Chambeyronia macrocarpa from New Caledonia. Carpoxlylon macrospermum from Vanuatu. This is an exceptionally beautiful species. From comments on PT it seems that the perfect microenvironment is needed to grow this in California and Florida. It thrives in Hawaii where you can count on them to develop a distinctive swollen base.
  28. 10 points
    We have some humming birds nesting in our dypsis lucabensis right now and it has been fun for my wife and I to watch them grow up. Looks like anyday they will be moving on. We also have some crows (not so cool) nesting 40ft up in our caryota urens. Anybody else have any pictures to share?
  29. 10 points
    One of the Phoenix roebelenii was right off our kitchen window, so when the Humming bird's nested in it, it was about 18" away from the window. Our indoor cats would climb up behind the sink to get close and watch "kitty television" as we called it. First the view they saw looking through the window and second one of the cats engrossed watching the evening feeding show.
  30. 10 points
    Our Carlsbad garden was a mecca for nesting humming birds. We typically had 3-4 nests per year in the yard due to attractions like trees that had numerous blossoms for long periods (African tulip in late summer and through autumn as well as Bauhinia x blakeana which flowered from Autumn through until mid-spring), aloes and hibisucus. We didn't have to put out feeders to attract them, they were content with the natural feeding grounds the yard provided. Here is a sampling with only the photo of the parent feeding a pair of chicks which isn't a nest in a palm (African tulip tree instead). Phoenix roebelenii and Caryota were there favored palms, but they also used the Foxy Lady I had in a pot while waiting to move to its new home here in Leucadia.
  31. 10 points
    I just planted my Sabal Minor and it looks great. Here are also a few pics of my little Washys, and my Trachy.
  32. 10 points
    I had a hooded oriel build a nest on my sabal mexicana.
  33. 10 points
    Hello all, D.C. may not be the most palm-filled place of all, but there are certainly quite a few palms around town if you know where to look. When palm lovers think of D.C., there are usually two palms that come to mind. The massive 11+-foot-tall needle palm at the National Arboretum which is over 50 years old, and the huge windmill palm at the Air and Space Museum, which was planted at the Air and Space Museum in 2000 and is over 15 feet tall. There are quite a few other notable palms throughout the city and surrounding areas, but these are two of D.C.'s finest. And recently, within the last two months or so, the massive windmill palm at the Air and Space Museum was dug out moved to the Smithsonian Castle. When I drove by the museum I was shocked to see it missing, but I remembered a number of months ago a viewer on YouTube said they spoke to a gardener a number of months ago at the Air and Space Museum who said that they may be moving the palm to the Smithsonian Castle in a year or two, and a year or two from then would be about now, so I hurried over to the Castle to see if the palm was there and indeed within seconds I spotted it towering over the surrounding Enid A. Haupt Garden near the main entrance to the Castle from the garden. It is protected by the large walls of the Smithsonian Castle, much as it was protected by the walls of the Air and Space Museum, so it is certainly a similar micro climate, a listed 7b and some say an 8a although I'm not so sure about that. In any case, here is the palm before and after being moved. I wanted to let you know so that if you are in D.C. and go to the Air and Space Museum and see that the Trachy is gone, you don't have a heart attack like I nearly did. The bottom line is that I am extremely happy to see that they did not remove the palm and it appears to be doing well, they did a good job with the transplant. The Smithsonian knows what they're doing, they have lots of hardy palms planted around several of their museums, and they put the windmill it in a good new spot. They also moved the palm at just the right time of year, right after winter is over so it has spring, summer, and fall to become established like it had in the previous location before winter. Thanks! In January and February, prior to being moved: On Saturday, in their new location in the Haupt Garden next to the Smithsonian Castle:
  34. 10 points
    Nice! Mine was 1 gallon in 1998. Twenty two years later it has at least 7' of trunk.
  35. 10 points
    I did it... I can call myself crazy. I drove to Lowe's San Antonio, the one from 11718 I-35N since the one in New Braunfels did not have any Canaries left. At least this is what I was told when I called the New Braunfels store. With the San Antonio one, first time I was told they don't have any (although their stock at the store that they checked was showing nine in stock) because one person was not finding them, I called again and surprise, one guy managed to find them, at least five of them. I was told that I can be transferred to Customer Service to pay for them by phone and have two set aside for me. Their line did not work to be transferred so I called again, again it did not work. Long short story, I drove three hours to get there, and surprise, two Canaries were put aside exactly next to one of the registers from the Garden Center. I looked at some other ones that they had there, the two that were put aside were the best looking ones. They also had some Filifera there but they had some fungus or something on the leaves, I have also seen some nice big Pindo Palms and also some Mule Palms. I drove another three hours home, hand washed my car on my driveway to get rid of the proof of the war that I had with all of the flies and bugs from Houston-San Antonio and San Antonio-Houston road and that's it. I can now rest knowing that I accomplished my obsession to get the two Canaries that I kept on searching like crazy for. My wife is saying that I am crazy for doing this... oh well... I might be. What made me drive to San Antonio and take the day off from work to do this was a $5k Canary that I saw at Moon Valley Nurseries, I guess they also had a 50% off... and I said enough, I have had enough and if I stay more without the Canaries then maybe I will be tempted to pay $1-2k for one and then for sure I will remain single. Below are the two Canaries that I got, exactly as they were close to the register. Below is the Canary that I saw at Moon Valley Nurseries which made me drive to San Antonio to get the baby Canaries above. Below are the rest of the Palms that I saw at San Antonio Lowe's, I was tempted to get some Filiferas, too but I did not like the fungus from their leaves. Now iI realize that I did not take any photos of their Mule Palms.
  36. 10 points
    I Know Mc Curtains get a lot of hate but I am proud of my largest one. This is mine 2 months after the arctic blast with a low of 4 degrees and full exposure to wind. No protection given to it what so ever!
  37. 10 points
    I have a few. They are prolific germinators.
  38. 10 points
    Just a few pics of some palms I took today in Panama City Beach FL.
  39. 10 points
    This might be more appropriate in the travel log forum, but I rarely look at that, so I'll post here even if it bends the rules a bit. After more than a month of unusually heavy rain, the skies over Hilo finally cleared in early April. I decided to celebrate the sunshine by heading up to Hawaii Tropical Botanical Gardens just north of Hilo. It had been closed during the pandemic, but reopened April 1. They have rebranded themselves as Hawaii Tropical Bioreserve and Garden. This is an amazing place and the first destination locals take visitors. If you have not visited it before, you should check out the website to learn about its history. https://htbg.com Basically, in 1977 a retired couple from the mainland, Dan & Pauline Lutkenhouse, bought 17 overgrown acres of abandoned sugarcane plantation with badly degraded and eroded soil and transformed it into what looks like pristine tropical rainforest. It is amazing that a massive forest can regrow in only 40 years. A similar botanical resurrection was achieved by poet William Merwin on Maui. This is the kind of thing most PT members dream about doing. The fact that this is even possible, and so quickly, provides a thread of hope much of the damage to the world's tropical forests could be reversed if people simply stopped cutting it down or burning it. Few of the palms have name tags, so my identifications are just my best guesses. But most are pretty obvious. Although there are thousands of palms on the property, 80-90% are the common Archontophoenix alexandrae. These may have been seeded by helicopter to control erosion of steep gulches. The palm collection is almost totally devoid of any Dypsis. Don’t know what was behind that decision. In no particular order... A mature Pelagodoxa henryana loaded with fruit greets visitors on the steep boardwalk down to the garden. The three monstrous Metroxylon amicarum at the bottom of the boardwalk have been shown many times on PT. Here I’ll just zoom in on the enormous crowns loaded with fruit. The ground underneath the trees is covered with fallen fruit. It’s heartbreaking to see it going to waste when so many people would love a chance to try germinating them. Of course, collecting any plant material is completely prohibited.
  40. 9 points
    Here is my latest drone video: the Key Thatch Palm (Leucothrinax morrissii) habitat on Big Pine Key. There are also a few Coccothrinax argentea mixed in there too. And I also bumped into some Key Deer on the island, though it seems they tend to hang out near people's homes rather than out in the wilderness. Enjoy! https://odysee.com/@PalmSavanna/FloridaKeys
  41. 9 points
    I wish I had photos of some of the other birds that have nested here in the garden but here are a few including some non-nesting “visitors.”
  42. 9 points
    Well, that was just Click-bait. Formerly Gtsteve, but I have changed my Username (as an IPS member you can do that,) because I want to help new members and the parent site the IPS. Let me explain. Firstly, I would like to advise new members of a few things, and not only new members, What are all you people afraid of by not signing off with a first name? Even if you like your clever/cryptic username or you think that the CIA, FBI KGB or Mossad is after you just make up a first name when you sign off. Why, because it is friendly and polite and I think that you are more likely to get a response. You could put it in your Signature. I think that the more active this forum is, it will help the IPS. People respond best to people not anonymous Usernames. And Two, why are some people so resistant to saying "thank you" by not hitting the Heart button. If someone takes the time or they share their knowledge or experience to help you, really in person (that is why I like names) would you not say 'Thank you'. That is what the heart button means to me. I think that everyone likes to be thanked for an effort. That will do for now, Just trying to help.
  43. 9 points
    Most folks think of Tillandsias as little, grey, twisty plants that can come glued in a seashell. Well this "little" guy could come glued...in a Tridacna gigas! One of the larger Tillandsias; T. australis sends out a long inflorescence before branching and revealing it's true colors. So if you want to see something very cool check back in a coupla weeks for an updated pic. Satisfaction guaranteed. 3 gallon pot
  44. 9 points
    I decided to try a needle palm here in zone 7b Mid-Atlantic. I figure that after 3 years of protection they should be near bulletproof here as they are rated as zone 6b and the summers here can be sweltering. I tried them here before but the first one died during the fall due to transplant shock (as it was shipped bare-root from the west coast) and the second one was a Home Depot blue pot from florida. I don’t think the blue pot one was a very strong plant as the leaves were quite brittle and snapped frequently. I’ve heard blue pots in general aren't very strong due to over-fertilization since they’re so slow growing. Anyway, this palm was shipped with a pot! So I hope that will ensure it’s survival. I also got it a bit bigger to make sure it’s hardy. I hope y’all like my new baby!
  45. 9 points
    This is the result of planting approximately 20 species of plants since March. Sorry about the weeds. 1. Bismarckia nobilis: I'm really hoping this does well, because it's my personal favorite palm, but marginal in my zone and will require protection in some winters. 2. Unknown banana variety (possibly Namwah). I love bananas; they're so fast, vigorous and tropical (+ edible if you can get them to fruit!). Damage is from a strong storm we had a few weeks ago. This banana is putting out leaves every 5 days now, so fun to watch it grow. 3. Clockwise: Ti Plant, 'Little John' Dwarf Bottlebrush, 'Redhead' Coleus, Purple Heart, Giant Calla Lily. I absolutely adore the Ti Plant. It cheers me up every time I see it in the garden. It will almost certainly die to the roots in the winter, but might come back. The bottlebrush I haven't seen flower yet, so waiting out on that one. The coleus is growing very vigorously, and I'm all for it. The purple heart is growing even more vigorously (I've heard the plant is a little invasive, sort of anxious about that, but should be easy enough to control). The giant calla has such a nice flower, and it lasts a good week or so. Not sure when it will flower again. 4. Blue iris (maybe blue flag). This is a perennial and has been coming back every year with the exception of last year (flowers, that is) for the past 8 years or so. Probably my favorite plant in the garden. 5. Unknown Canna. I'm looking forward to the full bloom. Cannas are awesome. 6. Morelo Blood Orange. No fruits on it this year. 7. Washingtonia robusta or more likely, filibusta. I love these, they are under appreciated and are not ugly; they are just the most common palm here by far. Unfortunately, I planted it below a bit of canopy, so hopefully it will break that and not be in part shade forever. 8. Mule Palm: it's a little tragic this is in so much shade, although it looks great as a jungle centerpiece: sooo tropical looking. 9. Variegated Fatsia Japonica. Woooow, such a beauty. I've heard these plants are vigorous growers. I love their elegant leaves. They are jewels in this jungle. 10. 'Black Magic' Alocasia. Quite a vigorous grower so far, it loves the shade. 11. 'Regal Shields' Alocasia. The lime green juxtaposed with the nearly black green and brown undersides are ravishing. 12. Queen Palm - the wild card 13. Bluecrown passionflower - very vigorous vine, has had 5 blooms so far. 14. 'Paige' Mandarin. There's only one little green sphere on it that might be a future ripe orange. Hopefully next year it will flower more profusely. 15. Clockwise: Alocasia 'Yucatan Princess', Easter Lily, Begonia, Liriope 'Super Blue', Calla 'Cherry Kiss' Garden front view: Garden back view:
  46. 9 points
    Any Cycads that surprised you through freeze events? After the big Texas freeze of 2021 (went down to 3F here), my unprotected Ceratozamia Hildae is showing growth!
  47. 9 points
    Bought myself a Christmas present back in Dec. Butia eriospatha in I guess a 7 gallon pot. It's been sitting in the full sun in my driveway for the past 4+ months. Finally got around to digging a whole and planting it. It's in part shade now, but in time I'll be cutting back the weed trees. This was December 2nd 2020 And today finally in the ground. Got my measuring stick there to keep track of growth now that it is in the ground.
  48. 9 points
    Update from Dallas’s big freeze. all twenty of my unprotected Trachycarpus are growing including fortunei and wagnerianus. Unprotected Brahea armata leafing out. And Butia odorata sending out bloom spike.
  49. 9 points
  50. 9 points
    Kyle, Most of the transformation from average landscape to tropical started twenty years ago and has been in constant evolution since. Here are a few shots of parts of the lansdscape. Sorry everyone that this is off topic.
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