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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/12/2021 in all areas

  1. 26 points
    I was lucky enough to spend an incredible evening at Mike's immaculate garden in Broward County, Florida. I believe he has over 700 species of palms and it's overwhelming. You can walk through it over and over again and see new things each time! Anyways, here are the photos! To see the complete album, click HERE First, here is a tribute to the native flora of the area. A beautiful Quercus virginiana (Live Oak) adorned with an amazing array of epiphytes. Calyptronoma plumeriana with burgundy petioles Tahina spectabilis getting huge Any IDea on what the ID of this Ravenea could be? Cyrtostachys renda hybrid matched my shorts! Veitchia look great when accessorized with epiphytes I hope you enjoyed the photos!
  2. 25 points
    My boy was climbing our Sabal causiarum today and it felt like a good time to post an update on this pig.
  3. 24 points
    Sort of a miniature Clino for me, which makes for a choice palm. Growing in what seems to be solid rock, which I’m sure slows it’s growth, gives it great scale and a palm to look at and not up. Nothing like the glow of a Clino crown shaft. Tim
  4. 24 points
    As usual, I took a walk through my container garden of palms and other tropicals this morning. To say I was NOT a morning person in the past is an understatement, but since I’ve become so into gardening, I can’t wait to climb out of bed before my alarm even goes off for work most of the time so I can check in on all my plants. 2020 was, as it was for most, and incredibly tumultuous year for me: COVID-19, cancer diagnosis within my immediate family, (everything turned out better than we’d hoped) cross-country move back to Florida, temporary salary cut because of the pandemic... it all added up to a slurry of stress and lost sleep that I’m sure many can identify with given the trials and tribulations of last year. I’ve always loved plants and I’ve always loved being outside. I’ve had palms in some capacity my entire life, but really being able to dive-in and get my hands dirty (literally, haha) was an absolute life-saver for me. Re-building my palm collection after a brief hiatus from FL helped me get outside, stay busy, and stay healthy both physically and mentally while avoiding large social gatherings and staying safe. You folks here at palm talk have a lot to do with that! Thank you all for all the help and advice you tirelessly provide that have allowed me to adequately care for what is now 35+ different species of palms in containers. Sadly, I’m renting this townhome and stuck with containers for now, (and seriously out of room, haha) but soon, the advice you’ve all shared will be put to work getting these puppies rooted in earth. I couldn’t help but feel proud as I looked through what I was able to accomplish and care for thanks to all of your advice and guidance. Thank you all!!!!
  5. 22 points
    Here is a catalog of all the bigger CIDP's around London and their locations, so that they can be monitored moving forward. It also helps for people to know where they can find them exactly, should they be in the area and decide to visit some. Many of these CIDP's are not well known, so I will be photo-documenting and logging quite a lot of fairly large specimens in the city and suburbs. Starting with the one at Lambeth Bridge... River Gardens, Fulham Hollands Park Kensington These CIDP's on the intersection are fruiting profusely and producing viable seed... Another one further down the street... There's two big CIDP's outside Hackney town hall. They've been there about 20 years. Egerton Place It's in need of a trim, which will make the trunk look even bigger... Mount Street gardens, Mayfair Notting Hill Richmond White City, west London Clapham Next to a church in Ealing, West London. Next to Wimbledon fire station. People's back gardens in Bermondsey, south west London Wapping, East London Eaton Square... Islington North Kensington... Clapham again... Camberwell... Southwark... East Dulwich Croydon Apartments in Fulham St. Annes in Notting Hill Front gardens kitted out... Earlsfield Another in Notting Hill... A back yard in the London suburb of Leyton... Decent sized specimen in Walworth... That will do for now. I will upload the rest tomorrow as there are tons of other CIDP's in people's gardens/yards. I've barely scratched the surface on the London CIDP's yet...
  6. 20 points
    Anyone else growing latania lontaroides in CA? I’ve had mine for quite a while now. Seems pretty trouble free.
  7. 17 points
    Sabal palmetto is known to have at least several variations, i.e., the spectacular 'Lisa'. But there are others Sabal palmetto 'Mocksville' - a distinctive looking variation from NC that may have extra cold hardiness Sabal palmetto 'DeFuniak Springs' - a variation from FL. Its strap leaves are quite blue Sabal etonia - I'm finally getting to try the real deal Sabal blackburniana - So, is it domingensis, bermudana, palmetto or ??? Sabal gretheriae - Hard-to-find species from the Yucatan. Note how lax the leaves are. Sabal guatemalensis - another Sabal with ID issues. Note upright leaves and l-o-n-g petioles
  8. 17 points
    I haven't been on an online forum other than Facebook in awhile. So I thought I would say just say hey. I live just north of Winston Salem, NC. in zone 7a. I mostly focus on cold hardy palms and agave. Here are a few recent pics of my yard. Followed by some taken last yr. Thanks for looking.
  9. 16 points
    Just thought I’d throw in a coupe more photos. These are Clinostigma samoense in a ‘wild’ part of the garden. They are loving the 80”+, (2000mm), so far this year. Glug, glug. Tim
  10. 15 points
    These are one of my favorites. They grow well for me with plenty of water and fertilizer. This was originally planted in probably 2015 or 2016 and was in a 2 gallon pot with 3 others. I let them all grow in the ground for a year or two but then decided to edit out 3 of the 4 so that I could get a big, fat trunk going. Show off your Majesty Palms!
  11. 15 points
    not mentioned in the video, but my favorite phrase, ...'orographic rainfall' https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-australia-56452910
  12. 14 points
    I believe this Dypsis is most likely a hybrid, if so, the seeds won’t be viable. But I’m going to attempt to germinate some just in case.
  13. 13 points
    Pics of my two savoryanums from east Hawaii Island, fronds reach up to 7 or 8 feet. These aren't large enough yet to teach me the subtle morphological differences from other Clinostigma species that I am growing: warburgii, harlandii, exorrhizum, ponapense, and gronophylum. However, the ID is from Floribunda, my source for them, so should be reliable.
  14. 13 points
    I don’t know if this is common for pritchardia but I’m not sure which one this is. I got it as pritchardia hillebrandii var. ula’ula. It has a red blush to the newly opened leaves and then fades to green. Does anyone else have this one?
  15. 13 points
    Quick shot illuminated by the light of the setting sun tonight.
  16. 13 points
    A few days before the eruption.
  17. 13 points
    This impressive bangalow palm forest is at Terania Creek in NE NSW. Also a Calamus muelleri and Linospadix monostachya crept in - pretty cheeky. Some nice Cyathea treeferns and strangler fig also. They also grow near Sydney in isolated pockets but not impressively like this.
  18. 12 points
  19. 12 points
    Took a trip out to a Washingtonia filifera oasis this month. I highly recommend it. Easily accessible with some monster specimens.
  20. 12 points
    So this last winter I let one of my Butia x Jubaea x Queen out for a winter test here in Mukilteo Washington Z8B. Well its good to know it took snow, a few nights of 20s F cold.and rain with no protection. Good to know this one is a great candidate for this area. Pic 3 is today. Took Pacific Northwest lickin and is still tickin
  21. 12 points
    Some photos from Bunya Mtns, Qld including bunya pines, hoop pines and some other interesting plants.
  22. 12 points
    I was stranded in Bali when Mt Agungn erupted in 2017
  23. 11 points
    This palm is in the original container, a plastic pot 15cm dia. x 18 cm tall (6x7"). The trunk is 203 cm tall (80"), and the crown is 30cm (12"), for a grand total of 251 cm (99"), equalling the room height. The trunk has 128 leafbase scars. This species is one of the few that can be 'mossed' to induce adventitious roots higher up. Then the top can be cut off and re-started shorter. At first I planned to do that, but as time passed, I found it more interesting to see how high this palm could go! Another one of similar size has died, so I will re-start this one soon. (Besides, it's getting too tall for my greenhouse! C. metallica is amenable to air layering. I reduced the height of this palm by half. Look for a node that already has some hint of adventitious roots. I used a very well-designed specialty pot. www.rooterpot.com
  24. 11 points
    First time event in my back yard jungle! My only Archonotophoenix myolensis has the brightest red seeds I have seen in a long time. This native of the Atherton Tableland in Queensland, Australia, may be the rarest species in the genus, according to Palmpedia, and it is endangered. I don't know how many exist in the US. http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Archontophoenix_myolensis It is by far the smallest and most petite of my Archos and I am excited to have seeds to pass on. See photos below: Uncleaned and cleaned seeds Infructescense on palm Photos of Mother Palm
  25. 11 points
    It's Sabal photo time! A dozen years ago a topic on any Sabal palms would have sparked yawns or sneers. Back then on PT the topic du jour was Dypsis, Dypsis, Dypsis, 24/7, 365 days a year. An island in the Indian Ocean was flooding the world with hundreds and hundreds of Dypsis palms and people were going mad. Well, not actually that many hundreds because each Dypsis species had a minimum of eight names each. And Kew recognized none of them. Good times. That was then. Most palm lovers have come to the realization that of the estimated 2,500 species of palms in the world, 92% of them are not Dypsis and perhaps some of the less exalted genera were worthy of notice. Which brings me back to Sabals. And photos. I decided to update my photo library with photos of the Sabals on my Garden Lot. Many of them are what I call "uber dwarfs", the tiny varieties of Sabal minor named for the towns nearest where they were discovered. They have all the tenacious cold hardiness of their full-size cousins in a much smaller package. Sabal minor 'Blountstown Dwarf' - the original uber dwarf that introduced me to the variability of this species. At least one of the little palms in the flower box will flower for the first time. Sabal minor 'Chipola Dwarf' - slightly larger uber dwarf Sabal minor 'Wakulla Dwarf' - about the same size as Blountstown but is 60-70 miles south in FL's Big Bend Sabal minor 'High Springs' - another slightly larger uber dwarf Sabal minor 'Welfare' - A Texas S. minor found only near the ghost town of Welfare. How cool is that? It is notable for forming a short trunk
  26. 11 points
    Holy Jubaea! It’s alive!
  27. 11 points
    Well I got up this morning to thick fog and mist and about 16C with 100% RH. The fog didn’t lift until around 9.30am but it just reminded me of a cloud forest environment especially when I looked at my Parajubaeas which come from the Andes. So I took some pics. The trees were also dropping a lot of condensed water like rain in the rainforest area whenever the slightest breeze went through. I’m really happy that the trees were acting like rainforest trees. Really beautiful morning. Now in the afternoon it’s about 26C and very humid.
  28. 11 points
    One month's worth of growth on an 8-ft robusta in the Houston Heights area, lowest temp was 14f. Photos taken exaclt 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, and 4 weeks after the worst day of the freeze. This one is storming back to life!
  29. 11 points
    Was just noticing how big this thing is getting.
  30. 11 points
  31. 11 points
    Here's one I planted at my in-laws place. It doesn't get watered or fertilized (neither does the lawn, which turns brown in the dry season). It grows slower than the ones that I take care of, but it looks perfectly healthy despite the neglect. I just planted one in a neighbor's yard, and the first foot of soil was like loose beach sand due to our recent lack of rain. I'll be taking jugs of water to it to keep it going until the rainy season starts, but once it's established I'll leave it alone. As long as this species isn't bothered too much by lethal bronzing or palmetto weevil, I think it'll be one of the most carefree palms for Florida.
  32. 11 points
    If there was GW remember that you would be under water...so no.
  33. 11 points
    Here’s a few pictures from Inks Lake, Texas
  34. 10 points
    So I've been lurking here and getting involved periodically but haven't officially gotten a chance to say hello. We're just north of Dallas and build our dream pool and backyard last year (still have more to do) and with that, I've always wanted palms.. We are new to Texas, and where we're from (IL) we'd never be able to have much of anything... so here we are! We have a little bit of land so I'm doing my best to add palms where possible. This will serve as my official progress thread as well. We finished the pool in October, and originally planted five Windmills and three Sabal Texana (small size). Lost one windmill during the storm, jury still out on the Texana. Pool area to enjoy the summer heat. Trachy on the right of picture, and there are five Chamaerops humilis before the waterfall. They're young but we're patient to watch them grow. Trachy looks rough but growing a new spear so think we're good. Pygmy Date Palm poolside Rest of the Trachys. They took a beating but appear to be doing fine now. Small Sabal Birmingham We cleared out a bunch of stuff from the back of our property that gets great sun and put down 2x Sabal Birminghams and 2x W. Robustas. 3x Pindos, 3x Sabal Majors Pindo and filiferas
  35. 10 points
    Survived neglect and historic cold. However it has no local friend to pollinate with. Both Nanus I have seen in Texas, both eventually got a trunk of 2 ft
  36. 10 points
    Update on my cocos, it has resumed rapid growth. There are 3 new fronds in the center. The trunk also appears to be continuing to gain height. Happy to report that it looks like I did manage to keep it alive through a super cool December and several frost/freeze events.
  37. 9 points
    Built a miniature treehouse (approx 1:48 scale) for a pair of c. elegans I've had for a while. The base structure of the treehouse is a balsa wood kit I bought on Etsy that I then added my own accessories to. I always love imagining I'm a tiny explorer in my huge plants, like Zac in FernGully. Here's the link for the kit: https://www.etsy.com/listing/673224150/amazing-plant-house-miniatuur-boomhuis?gpla=1&gao=1&&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=shopping_us_fathers_day_All_Products&utm_custom1=_k_EAIaIQobChMI6ufkhbvx7wIVUQZ9Ch3G2gCLEAQYASABEgK-n_D_BwE_k_&utm_content=go_1707961842_69268681569_331635230091_aud-406953526999:pla-293946777986_c__673224150_12768591&utm_custom2=1707961842&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6ufkhbvx7wIVUQZ9Ch3G2gCLEAQYASABEgK-n_D_BwE
  38. 9 points
    These are my two Kerriodoxa. This is a solitary palm species. Very slow growing. Front Yard, 2012 Back Yard, 2018, 2020, 2021
  39. 9 points
    I bought these in the mid 1980’s and have since moved then through a number of pot sizes. Until they reside, together in this pot. Bright shade, occasionally feeding and regular watering. I live in Victoria Aus near the coast
  40. 9 points
    Can't grow them like Hawaii here in a warm temperate climate but they give me pleasure. The crownshaft is particularly beautiful but I resisted pulling off the old boot for the photo.
  41. 9 points
    I have 2 that are very young. Planted last spring as probably 3 gallon size. Now both are 6 feet tall at the top of the leaves. Pretty fast growers too. Not Archontophoenix fast but put out 4 leaves last year.
  42. 9 points
    This juvenile Brahea armata suffered spear pull a few weeks after the Great Texas Freeze of 2021 (wet freeze with 2 nights at 6F and 9F, respectively); however, it started pushing up a new spear this past week. I am cautiously optimistic for this little guy. With the exception of my Sabal palmetto, Sabal mexicana, Sabal minor, Serenoa repens, and Nannorrhops ritchiana (all of which are now wet freeze champions in my opinion), every other palm I have planted outside (covered or not) has suffered spear pull since the freeze event (i.e., Washingtonia sp., Phoenix sp., Trachycarpus fortunei, Sabal causiarum, Brahea sp. "Super Silver," and Trithrinax brasiliensis). To date, this little Brahea armata is the only one of those palms that has shown any signs of life post-spear pull.
  43. 9 points
    Big Filifera. Lots of green. Good to go.
  44. 9 points
    About a week ago we trimmed some of the lower fronds off our largest Borassus flabellifer to make room to place newly potted voodoo lily bulbs (genus Amorphophallus) and to show off the vibrant colors and black highlights of the palm's trunk. I grew this palm and its sibling from seeds sent to me by Kris in India in 2008 - love and thanks to you, Kris! Borassus flabellifer, 2021, Cape Coral, FL
  45. 9 points
    New growth (!!) on Phoenix dactylifera after 5F.
  46. 9 points
    You all need to cut Bill some slack. If you haven't paid him money yet you got nothing to gripe about. I peddle seeds and seedlings and it's a lot of work. Bill is my main source of rare palm seeds now and I don't like mainlanders treating him like a servant in the Banana Republic of HI. If he doesn't dance fast enough to your tune find another source of seeds. I appreciate all he does because he is one of only two HI PTers that offers seeds at all.
  47. 9 points
    Yes, that's a remarkable one. There used to be another Windmill next to that one, which was nearly as tall, but which has been removed for some reason. I really like that W. filifera at Casa Rio, too. It has been happily growing surrounded by concrete forever. Here it is circa 1965. And I agree, the ones in front of Las Canarias are really awesome! In fact, that whole little section of the river, which also includes the tall Trachycarpus and the Washingtonia around it, as well as the Peltophorum, has a special place in my heart. This is because of the location’s connections with both the history of the city and the history of palm-growing in San Antonio. Palms have been cultivated for many, many years along that north bank, upper arm segment of the Great Bend of the river. The building behind the palms in this picture is the rectory of St. Mary’s Church at the North St. Mary’s Street Bridge. The belfry of the church is right behind that. From what I gather, since 1885 the resident pastors there have been the Oblates. In modern times, the Oblate seminary grounds elsewhere in the city houses that amazing palm collection which has been discussed in other threads on Palmtalk. Well, way back in 1915, nurseryman E.W. Knox said that the oldest Washingtonia filifera in the city, as far as he knew, “is in the yard of the Oblate Fathers in St. Mary’s Street. The seed of this palm was planted by Rev. Father Smith [who came to St. Mary's in 1886] and another was planted by him at the Santa Rosa Hospital. Seeds from these two trees have since been planted in several of the city parks and many of these palms now may be seen in San Antonio. They will live more than 100 years.” He also went on to say that “Probably the original Sabal Texanum [Mexicana] in San Antonio is one now growing in the Main Plaza Park. It was given to the city by Antonio Rivas, who repeatedly had refused large offers for it. Ludwig Mahncke, when Park Commisioner, obtained seeds from this tree and raised a quantity of palms from them which are now scattered about in various parks.” Also, in 1911 he had stated that "Father Smith secured seed of the Washingtonia Filifera and grew three trees, which are now large plants. About twenty-one years ago [i.e. 1890] our firm shipped the first [rail] carload of Washingtonia Filifera from California and among those were a few Washingtonia Sonia" [(sic)-- presumably sonorae or now known as robusta] Here is what the previous church looked like in 1894, and what the previous rectory, located between the church and the river, looked like circa 1900: Here is another view of the old church and the Oblate Fathers home/rectory, undated, from St. Marys’ website. The river is out of view to the right. Notice the palms by the sidewalk. In this photo from 1910, you can see some palms growing by the rectory on the upper river bank. Incidentally, that beautiful old iron St. Mary's Street bridge (dubbed the “Letters of Gold Bridge”) was transferred to Brackenridge park in 1925 when the current concrete one was built. This picture was recreated for the cover of this San Antonio railway tourist guide from 1911. Artistic license was clearly used-- the tall palm tree looking like a coconut actually appears to represent a telephone pole in the photos above! To me it’s interesting to contemplate this short stretch of riverbank being among the very first sites for palm cultivation in San Antonio. What's more, just a stone’s throw upstream, on the west side of bridge near the start of the Great Bend, was where the famed John Twohig house was located. It sat near the Ben Milam Cypress that they always point out on the River Walk boat tours. This was the house that appears in so many dreamy early paintings, engravings, and photographs of the river. Twohig, an Irish merchant and banker with a very colorful life, hosted lavish dinners for the likes of Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Sam Houston, and many others at his house, not far from where that River Walk Jubaea sits now. Looking downstream to St. Mary's, late 1800s Also looking downstream from the Twohig house to St. Mary's and the bridge, late 1800s Same perpective, 1938, with the current concrete St. Mary's Street bridge, about one year before the River Walk project first broke ground. Downstream, just on the other side of the St. Mary's Street Bridge, with palms along the banks: The catastrophic flood of 1921, which devastated large areas of downtown and covered Houston Street in 9 ft. of water, severely damaged the old St. Mary’s church. It had to be razed and rebuilt. The old church and rectory appear in some of the iconic photos from the time, like this one (notice the palms)… ... and this one (see the Washingtonia across the street next to the church) All that water is where the tall Syagrus on the River Walk stands now! It was those floods that led to the infrastructure changes which eventually permitted the safe river-level development of the River Walk as we know it today. Besides the beauty of the palms and tropicals along that part of the river bank, there is a lot of neat history where those trees stand!
  48. 9 points
    If size matters.....please don’t tell this guy. You might hurts its feelings. I know it’s not impressive and its an empty spathe, but it’s this Dypsis leptocheilos’ first sign of wanting to reproduce. firs
  49. 9 points
    I photographed these in Royal National Park on Sydney's southern fringe. There's also a Cyathea australis treefern.
  50. 8 points
    Here's an update pic taken today. It's been a very wet summer so everything has grown well since the first good rains 3-4 months back.
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