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  1. I sold Palmpedia several months ago to someone who has the resources and passion to keep it going. It became too much for me alone to continue and provide the time and expense to do it justice. The new owner is an IPS Member, and a long time lurker on PalmTalk. He is a terrific guy, capable businessman, and a palm/plant lover. I think it is a good fit, and the future of the site is in better hands now that he is involved. Give him time, and I expect many more improvements. Thanks to all those who provided financial and emotional support during its creation and almost 20 year run so far. I too use the site often, and hope to for another 20 years.
    31 points
  2. Palms around San Diego, CA! Highlight was definitely the Corypha umbraculifera. The owner was kind enough to investigate the strangers outside admiring his garden, and he states that he bought it as a seedling 25 years ago at Huntington Botanical Gardens and that he treats it against weevils every 4 months, as the weevils have unfortunately claimed a few of his palms already, including a 40 foot Bismarckia.
    28 points
  3. I don't see many of these around nor many posts. This is one of my favorites and today it definitely caught my eye. Total eye candy for me. Post them it you got them. I always enjoy photos of others well grown palms. Cheers Tin
    23 points
  4. True story, my neighbors call me Tarzan for a variety or reasons, maybe it's the loin cloth I wear around the yard 😆. Having a jungle is a must for any respectable Tarzan. This is just the "main drag" down the middle, there's so much more but iIwas working in the back and just did a quicky. Sorry no sound , it looks a lot better if you select HD. Not a big youtube guy so not sure how to do all this stuff.
    22 points
  5. These two Jubaeas are well known in northern Spain. They are well over 100 years old. Maybe 120. Last week I went by that place, and I "had" to take some pictures. The two trachycarpus behind must also be over 100 years old. The one on the right is fat, but the one on the left is tummy. It must be over 1 metre in diameter, over 3 metres girth. The first time I saw them was in the early 1990, so 30 years ago, and they weren´t so fat .
    22 points
  6. Clinostigma savorianum is a pretty palm I love the way the fronds retain the edge on the newly opened friends.
    20 points
  7. Here’s my big one. It’s gorgeous - visitors say as much - but hard to get a nice picture of it, crowded in with a Chambeyronia oliviformis. Show us yours!
    19 points
  8. A friend shared this photo and several other astonishing photos of storm effects on trees in Sacramento, a city proud of its urban forest which includes many trees aged 100 - 300 years old. The way these palms snapped off is pretty shocking, but imagining the weight of those crowns pushed by high winds... wow! Northern California is getting hit hard.
    19 points
  9. First picture 2005, second one today.
    18 points
  10. Hello Everyone, Thank you for some of the positive messages, i am thankful for all of them. My name is Joao Santos Costa, i am from Portugal and i am the new responsible for the management and administration of Palmpedia and connected resources. Palmpedia as been over the years a fundamental and unavoidable tool, an endless source of information to the palm growing hobby. I am forever thankful to Dean, Ed Vaile, and all people who have contributed immensely to the creation of this incredible resource. My path with palms started more than ten years ago, when i wanted to create a big garden around my former residence in Lisbon, and wanted to have some privacy from all the neighbours, together with the perpetual feeling of evasion and "vacations feeling" every-time i would step home. Likewise many of you the inicial humble idea of planting a few palms turned out to be an incurable addiction, that month after month started to influence where we would spend the weekends, to where we would go for vacations. From a nice garden the things escalated quickly and i ended up with a full size jungle with dozens of mature specimens, I got hooked. I loved every bit of the new lifestyle, this garden could provide, so did my children and my wife. From late night barbecues, to tiki jacuzzi parties, to bird watching with my toddler, was a fantastic experience that forever change my mindset on the "art of living". Professionally, i have responsibilities in a group of companies with ranging activities from managing real estate portfolios, to construction and hospitality businesses. Few years ago, i started the acquisition of multiple agricultural investments and have turned my hobby into a full size business operation. Currently we have 3 state of the art productions facilities, manufactured entirely in double glaze polycarbonate, biomass heating, evaporative cooling, and full climate control, where we are fully devoted to the germination of palm trees. We are also establishing plantations in Sao Tome and Principe, and Mauritius for the more tropical varieties. As of today we hold several tens of thousands of 2-3 year old palm seedlings of around 237 varieties and growing. I am focused in creating top quality plants. Our aim is to introduce recently discovered or unusual palms in the ornamental market, after all i guess we are all tired of finding the same options for sale in the conventional garden center! I have quite ambitious plan for the new Palmpedia, and i hope to have you all along for the journey, but i also understand that i will not be able to be a very consensual and accommodate everyone requests, but i will try! In what concerns the future of Palmpedia, our plan is to keep the entire structure in the wiki platform like was originally intended and allow edition, inputs, and submission of pictures and content. We are currently working in the log in and users platform to allow people to sign in and edit the content of the pages, i believe in the next few days will be operational. Also i understand that there are several scientific revisions that need update, and we are currently compiling with the help of fellow forum members the list of updates needed to perform. So if you have a suggestion or topic requiring update we are thankful to receive them by email to info@palmpedia.com. Palmpedia will remain a free and open "go to place" for palm information, independently where you are in the globe. Regarding our plans on the comercial front. We are currently testing the new online marketplace, that will be made available on the website. This will be a multi vendor online shop, (much like amazon) and will allow verified nurseries, brands, individual growers, and hobbyists to sell their palms, and their seedlings. With a very simple and user friendly platform will allow every nursery to have equitable online exposition and a simplified online sales spot. If you know a nursery let them know that we are working in order they can soon list their palms and exotics stock in the world leading marketplace we are creating. I strongly believe in this model because because is the only way to provide a truly global service without the limitations of phytosanitary regulations. In other words, depending on the place you are and will access the online shop, the assortment you see available to purchase is within your geographic range to be delivered without need of phytosanitary certificate. I am always available at info@palmpedia.com I hope to have all of you along, Best Regards, Joao
    18 points
  11. Hello friends! Jeff and Su wish you a happy new year and have plenty of surprises on the new price list, plus many favorites, nearly 250 species. Some highlights are the blue form of Dypsis decipiens, which has long been a favorite of people touring the garden and is sure to be a showstopper in any garden, as well as the rare and beautiful understory palm Asterogyne guianensis. Both forms of Joey are back in 4in pots, Pinanga "Maroon Crownshaft" in two sizes, the golden form of Livistona benthamii, and limited amounts of harder to find palms such as the majestic Roscheria from the Seychelles. 60+ new palms / sizes added to the new list, filter them out by typing (N) into the search, but the list is still as extensive as ever with all the usual offerings. View the price list at https://floribunda.xyz/pricelist Have a great new year and email / call Jeff with any questions or details before you place your order. FAQ Here // Contact Here Axel's (Mauna Kea Cloudforest) thread on Blue Decipiens from 2014 with great high res photos: Please note that there has been a big shift in nomenclature for the genus Dypsis, many have been moved back to Chrysalidocarpus and we have adjusted our list accordingly, so if a Dypsis that you are used to has disappeared, search for Chrysalidocarpus to check if it has been moved there.
    16 points
  12. https://www.palmpedia.net/palmsforcal/Presteoa_acuminata_var._acuminata This link shows my previous attempt to grow this palm. Unfortunately the original ones died several years ago. I was fortunate to receive 3 seedlings a few years ago from a Bay Area plantsman, after his return from a visit to Ecuador. I raised them up to 3-gallon citrus pot size and have ground planted two in my garden today. The third one I gave to a fellow palm gardener here in SF. When I receive a gift of special plant material I don't consider it to be truly mine until I can pass some along to a third person. Anyone else growing this in California ? Here is the image of one I planted today !
    15 points
  13. Both planted about the same size and same time, about 10 ft apart. Neither ever fertilized. While I do love beccariophoenix alfredii, it's clearly not a real coconut substitute. Like all beccariophoenix it's pretty slow, takes up a massive circumference and the fronds spread for miles lol. beccariophoenix alfredii is very jurrasic park like.
    14 points
  14. some of you may remember this titan Vlad who lives in Browns point Washington in the Pacific Northwest. took a trip out there with his sort of mentor Dave Alvarez.. Vlad is ill from cancer but he had a good enough day to talk with us, also had the pleasure of meeting Bryon Jones who was also there. he built the amazing gardens at the point defiance zoo. here's some pics. you may have to scroll down a bit. the pic upload messed up                                                                                                   20230205_114943.mp4 20230205_121304.mp4
    14 points
  15. Koko Crater Botanical Garden on the far east coast of Oahu has a hot, dry climate and features desert species from around the world - cacti, baobabs, plumeria, and lots of palms. I know they had Hyphaene, Copernicia, and some beautiful Brahea. My favorites were the absolutely massive Sabal uresana. I would imagine in the range of climates between Koko Crater and Volcano on the Big Island that there is a theoretical spot for any palm, as Xenon said. Here are a few photos from my visit a few years ago:
    14 points
  16. D. Marojejyi and A. Vestiaria going to flower this year.
    14 points
  17. Lots of changes, lots of deaths and still learning! Haven’t lost the bug, only has got worse😂
    13 points
  18. Surprise find in Baton Rouge. Mature Sabal mexicana planting behind Parrain's Seafood Restaurant.
    13 points
  19. Back in around 10 years ago I planted very small Satakentia liukiuensis in my garden - from memory it was in a 4" pot. Here's two pics which give a good indication of growth rate. October 2015 Today
    13 points
  20. This year the harvest on my Trachycarpus palms is exceptionally good. One of my trees has the leaves hanging from the weight of the heavy inflorescenses. This one takes the crown this year in terms of seed production.
    13 points
  21. Years ago on Palmtalk I said my Attalea was Attalea amygdalina. It's NOT. The fronds have NO petiole and the leaflets are very different and Amygdalina is said to have NO trunk. It's been throwing a pedunce out for a few years but NO flowering. It's got 2 VERY large Flowering peduncles and "bee's galore" pollinating her. I started growing Palms 30+ yrs ago . When I get a chance with Tigers Mobile I'll get a shot of the whole Palm which is trunking and over a mtr wide and massive fronds. The flowering section itself IS a good mtr long so LOTS of seed will come off the 2 Peduncles. Time to get some Bee Hives with SO many flowering Palms,Tree's, Orchids, Anthuriums, Philodendrons, Fruit tree's , Cactus, Bamboo's, Bromeliads, Vines etc. Good for ya Brain to be into ALL plants and GOOD for "Mother Earth" and the local wildlife. VERY healthy addiction being a "plant addict" 😊Happy Gardening to ALL.
    13 points
  22. I have over 50 in my landscape and only a few are solitary. In their natural habitat, they are often found in dense groves, often with trunks touching each other. The rest of mine are in fairly tight groves. There are no issues with planting them close together. Just remember that they are a semi-aquatic species and need lots of water year round. You can’t over-water them. What growing zone are you in may I ask?
    13 points
  23. Chrysalidocarpus (Dypsis) Ovobontsira just lost a leaf and showing some nice color along with first ring of trunk
    12 points
  24. Yup. Even on the Big Island's east side there was a wide range of growing habitats that I just observed. On the drier side right by the Ocean's cliffs, there were Cocothrinax, Copernicia and large Encephalartos cycads growing (and the blue Encephalartos remained blue despite the rain). Just up the hill several hundred feet in elevation, were the gardens with all the tropicals we see on these pages in Tim's garden, Bill Austin's, Mike Merritt's, "Hilo Jason" (and eventually "Pepeʻekeo Jason") along with all the Leilani Estates gardens and of course Jeff & Suchin's Floribuna garden. My apologies to those I left out in that "garden name" drop. Xenon said it well, there is a habitat for everything on those rocks in the ocean, just go up or down the hill, leeward or windward side and you will find what you want in climate zones. My wife and I stayed in the Hawaiian Paradise Park neighborhood based on a lap pool (my wife wanted to be able to swim laps). Ironically right next door was a spectacular garden that showed the potential of the oceanfront East side of the Big Island for growing some things one might not expect. I peeked into but never bothered the owner who has a growing area for his more tropical plants in a wetter part of Leilani Estates I was told. An example of plants we think of as from drier habitats is shown below.
    12 points
  25. Lots of things are more tender than coconuts, coconuts can reach fruiting maturity well into the subtropics like halfway up the Florida peninsula, the southern tip of Texas, etc. The real cold tender stuff is generally from the central Indian and Pacific ocean areas (Seychelles, Indonesia, New Guinea, Melanesia, and equatorial Polynesia) such as Cyrtostachys, most Hydriastele, Iguanura, Calyptrocalyx, Phoenicophorium, Manicaria, Clinostigma, Pigafetta, etc. These palms are generally native to areas with all time record lows above 60F/16C.
    12 points
  26. Livistona chinensis I'd say
    12 points
  27. I've got one of them going through the roof downstairs. Since the flood the growth is phenomenal and of course all the rain we've had since.
    12 points
  28. My Licuala ramsayi growing in Loxahatchee Groves.
    12 points
  29. Ah yes. I’m a visitor that stated this as I recall as well. Lookin’ good. I’ve got a small 5G I threw in the ground last spring. Not a ton of movement but no decline either so I’ll take it. Terrible picture in the dark attached. That Oliviformis is something to write home about. Perfect height right now for viewing. -dale
    12 points
  30. A few pictures from my trip… Chinati Mountains sunrise:Chinati Hot Springs w/ Brahea armata:Candelaria, TexasShafter, Texas:Some roadside art exhibits outside Marfa:
    12 points
  31. Yesterday the PSSC had a mass PRA and annual banquet in Corona del Mar, Newport Beach, at Sherman gardens. Holy howlin’ Howeas….
    11 points
  32. Thank you! Couldn't have wished for a more destructive winter after a record-breaking summer that left most of my palms weakened already (I generally don't irrigate). I had left all my protection from the earlier freeze so I don't expect this event will be able to much more much more than I would have already lost. Unless I see temps in the 30s in the long term forecast, I do plan to take protections off next weekend and start living the Spring life. I am trying to have fun with hardscape in the meantime. Check out this little waterfall I put together with some rocks (Sabal Louisiana - always unprotected, in the back)! ~ S
    11 points
  33. 11 points
  34. Mine yellow a bit in our Northern CA winters but otherwise keep pushing on. The one pictured was planted out of a 4” container years ago.
    11 points
  35. Many of you have heard of this mythical palm somewhere in Georgia, but few know the real story or what it actually looks like. A fellow PT'er knew of them, and provided a large quantity of seeds to a nurseryman in GA, who in turn sold them to RPS. RPS gave them the moniker 'Georgia Silver', and seeds were distributed. Here is the description on their website: "This really special and exciting form of this popular American palm comes from a relict population in central Georgia. These palms are wild, occurring on isolated sand dunes where ancient beaches used to be near the "fall line." The Silver Saw Palmetto is a full-sized, glaucous plant that is rarely available as it only sets fruit heavily following warm winters. This population is the most northerly, most inland ever found, and extremely cold hardy. A unique opportunity not to be missed!" All of this is accurate, but the only thing that I would add is that the palms themselves aren't as silver as you would find on the east coast of FL. Glaucous, yes...not exactly silver, however. I'm not sure where the picture on the website came from, but it's not representative of the actual color of the palms there. They are definitely different from the green form, however! The other part of the description that I would change is regarding their size. These palms appear to be genetic dwarfs. There is a post somewhere here on PalmTalk that shows a maybe 11 year old palm, still with strap leaves. I can't locate the post, but I managed to save the pictures on my phone. I won't re-post them here, because they aren't my pictures. Maybe the original poster will see this and share the pictures. I collected seeds in 2019 and sowed a few. They are probably the slowest-growing palms that I have ever grown, with just a few strap leaves after almost 3 years (there are only 3 growing in a decent-sized community pot. They definitely don't have seeds every year either. Sometimes only once every 2-3 years or more. Some of these pictures I got down close to ground level to take. There are some larger, greener Serenoa in the woods, so I suppose it's a possibility that the dwarfism is caused by environmental conditions and the deep sand, but that wouldn't explain why the seedlings are so painfully slow. I believe that they are genetic dwarfs, and that the larger Serenoa growing in the woods are the plain green form and different. These are also the northernmost, inland population of Serenoa known in their native range, so they should have an extra degree or two of cold-hardiness. In habitat, these very palms have been through 0F. Many, many years ago, another enthusiast managed to transplant a few of them and in 1996, they reportedly sailed through 9F with no problems. The day after Christmas of this past year, this area went down to 15F. I personally have no real experience with their ultimate cold-hardiness only to say that they can take 20F here in Gainesville in a pot with no issues, LOL. There are also some other, quite interesting plants of note in this area, which has very deep sand dunes in places. It's a hot, dry environment, seemingly inhospitable. A very far inland population of Quercus geminata lives here, perhaps the northernmost, inland population for this species as well. There is also an Opuntia species here that is glacially slow growing. I got two pads in 2019 and put them together in a pot. One has grown one pad in three years, the other has grown two pads. Sandhill Rosemary and other scrub vegetation can be found here as well. So there you have it. Still a mysterious little palm. The jury's still out as to whether they are dwarfs because of environmental conditions (that sand is deep and has almost zero nutrients) or genetics. Seedlings are among the slowest-growing palms on earth, seemingly, even with good soil and irrigation and nutrients. These seedlings are almost three years old. They are irrigated, but admittedly, I haven't fertilized them very often. Maybe only once or twice total. The glacially-slow Opuntia I referenced. A very rare sight!
    11 points
  36. Only since I was paged... I would lay things out very differently if it were my yard. I'd put my largest palms on the far right, in the back row. Since both Bismarckia & Beccariophonix were mentioned, I'll use those in my mockup (since it's one of my all-time favorite combinations). One of the goals for me is to "erase' my neighbors, so that's another reason to put the largest stuff at the perimeter. I'd also add a multi-trunk palm at the edge for a similar blocking effect, and to give variety against the single-trunk palms (I used lutescens in my mockup - which I *think* is common in your area, but definitely confirm). In front of the large palms goes the smaller plants. Serenoa reopens looks like a great choice based on internet photos. Then add lots of colorful tropical plants. The plants in my photo are just random ones that popped up when I typed "zone 8 tropical landscape". Doesn't matter all that much which plants you add... just pick non-green ones with a lot of COLOR. Arenga Engleri looks awesome in internet photos, and would make for a nice bushy addition (again, I'd probably use it as a neighbor-blocker, which is why I put it in the corner). Lots of other plants mentioned above would also look great, but I personally think you should limit any huge "monster" palms to the back & sides of the yard. As for the grass, I would lose the grass on the right side first (since a planter in that area would give a neighbor-blocking advantage). Then I would expand the planter near the house... probably with small to mid-size tropical plants. If I later want to get rid of more grass, I'd expand the planters (but again, keeping the tallest palms near the back. Rather than make palm "islands" in the grass, I'd try to put the grass in a large swath with curved lines at the edge (makes it easier to mow as well). If it were me, I'd probably expand both planters even more than what is shown in the photo... almost to the point where the grass is just a "path" to the backyard. Landscape boulders would also be a nice addition - either as a border to the planters or as large feature rocks. That's just what I would do... there are no set "rules" 😉
    10 points
  37. Burretiokentia koghiensis and Cyphophoenix elegans (in the background) opening up new fronds after one of the wettest winters we’ve seen in forever and a couple nights with temps into the high 30’s.
    10 points
  38. Here’s an updated picture of my Hedyscepe aquired in March ‘21. It was finally grounded sometime last spring and has appreciated it. Looks like the base has definitely fattened up and taking on that coveted Hedyscepe look all of us love albeit small still. I planted another one in my front yard. This one was a small 1G and is it a bit more sun. Doesn’t seem to mind actually. Both these are growing right thru our “winter” here in SoCal and just pushed new fronds. -dale
    10 points
  39. Cyrtostacys renda the Lipstick Palm dead below 50 F
    10 points
  40. One of my favorite and best looking palms.
    10 points
  41. Two beautiful Jubaeas! One comment by gurugu was particularly interesting. I wonder how long Jubaea trunks can continue thickening up? Beyond when a truck has formed and growth is primarily vertical? Here’s a pic of a JXB (F1) that I have — truck plenty thick already IMHO 😏 Boots starting to come off, so it should look more and more like momma Jubaea. Steve
    10 points
  42. Not a palm, but just found these photos that were taken at the same time. And yes, this is in Roseburg too. April 2007 and Nov 2012
    10 points
  43. "Snake Palm" on my property in Pepeekeo Hawaii. (What is the name of it?)
    9 points
  44. Hi, it seems we have a little progress over here... My six(!) year old C. borrhidiana last March... ...and right now - photo taken minutes ago. It gives me hope somehow. 🤞 regards Lars
    9 points
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