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  1. Eric in Orlando

    Eric in Orlando

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/23/2019 in all areas

  1. 18 points
    I brought my coconut outside for its annual shower! It gets dusty indoors here in Phoenix, AZ. This is my pride and joy. This palm is where my screen name comes from. I bought it from Home Depot in the summer of 2000. It's been moved around the valley from house to apartment back to house a total of 7 times. It gets so neglected I really have no idea what's keeping it alive. It's never been fertilized with anything but dirty aquarium water. I only started doing that in the past 4 years. It's never been repotted. I just fill in the top with new soil when it gets low. It sat in a dark apartment for a few years. It's almost always parked under an AC vent. It currently sits by a south facing window that only gets direct sun in winter. I used to have king palms and foxtails in pots sitting right next to it, but they did not survive. The small pot next to it is a dying coconut. In fact, that little one is the 4th one I have tried. The previous 2 died in about a year. This thing is a miracle and I hope it outlives me because it is truly like a child to me. I've often thought about putting it out on the patio you see in the photos. It's south facing and gets shade all summer. I'm just afraid of killing it. It seems happy indoors. I only remember one or 2 leaves ever turning brown. The lower ones usually get chewed by my escaping parrot or jumping dog or just break from the weight. You can see in the pictures I have it staked to keep it from falling over from the weight. I just can't show this beauty off enough. What can I say? I'm a proud dad!
  2. 18 points
    Just a hobby house for a back yard grower, but finally up and operational!
  3. 15 points
    I visited the Ria Lagartos Biosphere Reserve in Yucatan Mexico, with the mission to see Pseudophoenix sargentii in habitat. And what a beautiful habitat! Thousands of them growing along a beach with the turquoise waters of the Caribbean behind. There were also some very straggly looking Thrinax radiata growing there as well. The ground cover was very thorny and difficult to walk in without getting cut up. Luckily I had my drone with me and was able to get a lot of good footage without having to walk too much in the thorns. There was also a pink lake behind the beach that a lot of tourists visit (Las Coloradas), it is a salt pan used for salt production. Here's the drone video:
  4. 14 points
    All 3 from same seed batch...planted at same time
  5. 12 points
    Looks like spring is pretty much here to stay and I have a lot of work to do: spring check-ups, fertilization, insecticide and miticide treatments of my extensive container garden. This afternoon I decided to tackle my 15 Chamaedorea tuerckheimiis (Vera Cruz) which range from 2" pots to 3g. I got my first palms as 1g from Dale Holton in SE FL in 2011. This species is notoriously temperamental to grow but I've managed to achieve a cautious balance in keeping them alive and happy - most of the time. But in 2017 I repotted my 5 original palms and within months I lost two of them - they started dying leaf-by-leaf and nothing I did could save them. I've been leery of repotting ever since. I've managed to acquire a few more since, including 6 2-leaf seedlings that I germinated after a year-long wait. I've since moved them to their own 2" pots. But I am concerned that two of the medium palms had more leaf die-back this winter than I'd like but I'm hoping the work I did today will cheer them up. An unhappy potato chip palm usually ends up a dead one. How did I manage the feat of keeping this testy little palm plugging along in SWFL? Well, with a lot of research, trial and error. First, I keep them all in pots. My soil literally kills some species of Chamaedorea and I don't experiment with a palm this valuable. Second, they stay outdoors year round (I keep no houseplants). This species has more trouble with my sweltering heat, esp. at night, rather than cold. And sun turns them into potato chip crisps. I keep my Cham. tuercks. in deep shade in my jungle sitting on slotted shelf units placed over mulch. There they receive rain and irrigation while dense canopy keeps ambient temps 10-15 degrees lower in summer. That means I don't use them as decorative eye candy to wow visitors or stick them in garden boxes with geraniums. "Grow them, don't show them" is a good motto. I check in on them every couple weeks or so but otherwise leave them to their devices. They seem to like it that way. So, front and center this spring are my 15 Cham tuercks. I hope to still have all of them sit for photos next fall.
  6. 11 points
    There are several specimens scattered here and there through out this little town, some MUCH taller, but typically only one specimen per property. A local garden club member told me that there were once many planted in the city parks, but were cut down several years ago because of "safety concerns". However, the property owners where the palms are pictured below do not seem to mind the giant "pin cushions"...and I hope their thought stays that way. I regularly drive by this property, usually with no time to admire...but yesterday, I found myself with a little bit of time to slow down and capture a good picture to share.
  7. 10 points
    I was doing spring cleanup in my front Caribbean Garden and saw my Guihaia argyrata (not Caribbean, I know) is flowering. Unfortunately, this species is dioecious so whatever sex my little palm is, it lacks a partner. This dandy little palm hails from southern China and Vietnam where it grows on limestone cliffs. I have had mine for 10 years and this is the first year it has flowered. It is painfully slow growing but has had few problems over the years. In FL, it can't take full sun so this little guy lives happily as an understory palm beneath my many Coccothrinax. Since I bought it as a seedling around 2009 I have yet to see another G.a. for sale. I have tried germinating seeds with no luck (I understand seeds are difficult to germinate). It is supposed to be a clustering species but my palm is still solitary. The greenish yellow inflorescense rises from the center of the palm and is surrounded by a rosette of 6" long spines. Leaves are dark green, reduplicate and the backs have a silver-bronze scurf that glistens in bright light. Does anyone else have this palm? Please post photos. Guihaia argyrata, Cape Coral, FL
  8. 10 points
    I am doing spring checkups on my back yard container garden and discovered my potted Ravenea julietiae has made a quantum leap of a growth spurt - at least for this species. This Ravenea from eastern Madagascar is rare and endangered. I tried planting a seedling in my jungle about 10 years ago. It never grew a lick and survived 2 years before succumbing. Next time I found a seedling I left it potted, where lingered and grew maybe 1 leaf per year. I made a decision to treat it like a Cham. tuerck., i.e., set it under deep canopy then left it to its own devices. Lo, it began grow more leaves and get larger. Today I finally repotted and took the following photos. This is such a neat palm that reminds me of a cycad more than a Ravenea. Slow but rewarding grower. Ravenea julietieae, Cape Coral, FL
  9. 9 points
    A row of Butias visible from the Tokyo Monorail, near its north end. East side, just south of Kasumi Dori. I didn't spot others, not that I was looking. Trachycarpus everywhere, of course, and some tall planted Washingtonias. 〒108-0023 Tōkyō-to, Minato City, Shibaura, 2-chōme−13−6
  10. 9 points
    While continuing spring workups in my back yard jungle I came across this little Chamaedorea tenella (now lumped with geoniformis) putting out yellow flowers that look like tiny yellow beads on a string. I'm going to hazard a guess that this palm is a male. It is less than 18" tall and has a stem 1/4" in diameter. I've found them not to be difficult grows if treated correctly, which, for me, is like my Cham tuercks. Potted, kept moist in deep shade under canopy and pestered as little as possible. Chamaedorea tenella
  11. 9 points
    Installed this beauty for a customer today. Seems to be a great palm for warm 9b climates.
  12. 9 points
  13. 8 points
    I thought I would share some pics of my plants. First my two Trachycarpus nanus. I am hoping they will flower some day...
  14. 8 points
    Here is one of the taller specimens. The property owner claims her father planted this palm over 40 years ago, and proudly claims this specimen is responsible for all of the smaller ones nearby.
  15. 8 points
    Sharing some photos I took in Sao Paulo state, Brazil last month. These are growing in native savanna (Cerrado) in acidic, sandy soils. I am impressed by how small the Allogoptera despite being mature:
  16. 8 points
    I went to Gardenpalooza this weekend in Aurora, OR, and happened upon a couple nice 5 gallon Chamerops humilis cerifera that I couldn't pass up for the price. First one is planted out and both are just showing signs of flowering. The trachys in the background look terrible, but I got them for a deal at the end of last summer due to their condition. The winter and our east wind really yellowed them out but new growth is green and I've started hitting them with palm fertilizer so they should look decent my summer's end.
  17. 8 points
    that’s all from that trip. Enjoy!
  18. 8 points
    Anytime Chambeyronia unfolds its leaf, it is a guaranteed showstopper. I have several of them, but this particular one is the most colorful so far. Its total hight is only 50 in (127 cm), growing under direct sunlight from late morning on. One pic, light through, another light on.
  19. 8 points
    This is my 12 year old Licuala 'pre-ati' or I think it's called L. bifida now. Notice anything????
  20. 7 points
    Coccothrinax argentata and Thrinax radiata near Leu Gardens.
  21. 7 points
    Here's camplyospatha starting to sucker for me.
  22. 7 points
    Footage from April 1990 still showing severe damage to Queens and Phoenix at Epcot at Disney World. I guess they left them there for a little while to see if some would come back. You can see the famous Phoenix reclinata clumps in front of the Spaceship Earth exit building. I wonder if the ones there today are the same or if they had to replace them. Even large Phoenix at MGM Studios looked to have been trimmed to remove damage. That was one tough freeze if P. canariensis or datcylifera took damage. Some more footage from August 1990 with damage still evident at the Polynesian resort- I'm thinking those on the right were probably zone 9 hardy semi-tropical trees that had been severely cut back.
  23. 7 points
    Who was instrumental in starting both the movement and PalmTalk
  24. 7 points
    Well it wasn’t a total a bust. We had us an experimental large plant auction at which I managed to score this porno-tacular “coco-nut Queen” hybrid. Thanks @Josh-Ofor donating it!
  25. 6 points
    Sabal palmetto. I have two this size that I grew from seed I collected 10 or more years ago. Planted the seedlings in the ground in 2012 and they are finally starting to take off. No protection at all for the past few winters. Had only a small amount of leaf spotting after the winter of 17-18.



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