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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/14/2021 in Posts

  1. 19 points
  2. 19 points
    When I saw this, I thought I was going to need a pacemaker. In all my years looking at palm parts and pieces, I have never seen anything quite like it. John Hovancsek and I were going through the garden when I removed an old leaf sheath off this Dypsis basilonga only to reveal the first spathe since planting. In this case, a picture is worth much more than a thousand words. Tim
  3. 13 points
    This is a Kim inspired thread after posting photos of her D. hovomantsina. More of an update than anything else after realizing just how robust some of these palms have grown. Dypsis carlsmithii. Planted out back in late 2009 from cones, I’m surprised they even survived as we were going back and forth to San Diego and they were on their own for months. Look for the shovel for scale. Tim
  4. 11 points
    It's been awhile since y'all have seen my garden pics. All the photos were taken in the early morning hours so the shadows are long and makes it seem darker than it really is.... enjoy.
  5. 11 points
  6. 10 points
    Feb 17, 2021: June 16, 2021: The fact that they need to be cut down after a few frosts each winter and then EXPLODE at the first sign of warmth will always get me excited for summer!
  7. 9 points
    Dypsis robusta. Planted late 2011 from a 15 gal. Tim
  8. 9 points
  9. 9 points
    Edit: Palms on the property before I did any planting: couple of Cocos nucifera and a Euterpe oleracea, plus the ubiquitous Archontophoenix alexandrae not on the list. To the best of my knowledge from my imperfect records: *green shading = pot Acanthophoenix rubra 1 Actinorhytis calapparia 3 Adonidia dransfieldii 1 Areca caliso 1 Areca catechu 'dwarf' 3 Areca guppyana 1 Areca macrocalyx 3 Areca oxycarpa 3 Areca vestiaria 3 Areca vestiaria 'maroon' 35 Arenga hookeriana 3 Asterogyne martiana 1 Beccariophoenix fenestralis 1 Beccariophoenix madagascariensis 2 Bentinckia condapanna 5 Bentinckia nicobarica 3 Burretiokentia grandiflora 1 Calyptrocalyx albertisianis 6 Calyptrocalyx elegans 18 Calyptrocalyx hollrungii 1 Calyptrocalyx leptostachys 6 Calyptrocalyx pachystachys 6 Calyptrocalyx sp. (hybrid?) 3 Carpoxylon macrospermum 8 Caryota zebrina 1 Chambeyronia hookeri 7 Chambeyronia macrocarpa 7 Clinostigma harlandii 3 Clinostigma samoense 6 Cryosophila sp. (warscewiczii?) 1 Cyphophoenix alba 3 Cyphosperma balansae 3 Cyphosperma naboutinense 2 Cyrtostachys elegans 1 Cyrtostachys renda 13 Dictyocarium lamarckianum 1 Dictyosperma furfuraceaum 3 Dypsis 'dark mealy bug' 1 Dypsis ampasindavae 2 Dypsis basilonga 1 Dypsis bejofa double 1 Dypsis bejofo 5 Dypsis cabadae 2 Dypsis canaliculata 1 Dypsis carlsmithii 3 Dypsis hankona 1 Dypsis hovomantsina 3 Dypsis ifanadianae 2 Dypsis lastelliana 5 Dypsis mananjarensis 1 Dypsis marojejeya/coursii 1 Dypsis nauseosa 1 Dypsis onilahensis 3 Dypsis ovobontsira 1 Dypsis pachyramea 5 Dypsis paludosa 2 Dypsis pilulifera/'orange crush' 7 Dypsis prestoniana 1 Dypsis procera 3 Dypsis rosea 1 Dypsis saintelucei 3 Dypsis scottiana 1 Dypsis soanierana 2 Dypsis sp. Tsaravosira? (tag said) 1 Dypsis sp. Unknown 2 Dypsis sp. White 1 Dypsis tokoravina(prestoniana?) 1 Dypsis vatovavy blue 1 Euterpe sp. 'Orange crownshaft 3 Geonoma atrovirens 1 Geonoma schottiana 1 Hydriastele beguinii (Obi Island) 3 Hydriastele pinangoides 2 Hydriastele splendida 1 Iguanura wallichiana 3 Iguanura wallichiana 1 Ireartea deltoidea 3 Itaya amicorum 3 Johanesteijsmannia magnifica 1 Johannesteijsmannia altifrons 1 Kentiopsis pyriformis 3 Kerriodoxa elegans 5 Lanonia dasyantha 3 Lemurophoenix halleuxii 3 Lemurophoenix laevis 1 Licuala distans 2 Licuala glabra 1 Licuala grandis 6 Licuala paludosa 1 Licuala peltata var 'sumawongii' 8 Licuala peltata var peltata 2 Licuala ramsayi 2 Licuala stenophylla (syn triphylla) 1 Loxococcus rupicola 3 Lytocarium hoenii (Syagrus) 1 Marojejeya darianii 1 Mauritiella armata 2 Metroxylon amicarum 1 Neoveitchia storckii 5 Orania ravaka (?) 2 Pelagodoxa henryana 5 Philodstachys sp. 1 Phoenicophorium borsigianum 5 Pinanaga sylvestris 3 Pinanga 'maroon crownshaft' 1 Pinanga caesia 3 Pinanga curranii 3 Pinanga disticha (stained glass) 1 Pinanga javana 2 Pinanga kanchanaburiensis 1 Pinanga maculata 3 Pinanga philippinensis 5 Pritchardia maideniana 1 Ptychococcus paradoxus 3 Reinhardtia latisecta 1 Rhapis sp. (fine leaflets) 1 Satakentia liukiuensis 4 Synecanthus sp 1 Tahina spectabilis 2 Veitchia fm. New Caledonia 1 Verschaffeltia splendida 3 Voanioala gerardii 2 Welfia regia 1 123 species 308 palms
  10. 8 points
    Sorry for the low picture quality
  11. 8 points
    Okay, so a little background, I started my palm growing addiction back a few years ago, circa 2004 probably. Began with growing a bunch of cold hardy specimens from seed purchased from RPS, including Jubaea chilensis. I sold all but one and kept it potted until I found a home I could put it in the ground, which was in 2015. In 2017 I decided where in the yard I would put some of my palms which included my potted Jubaea chilensis. Currently it seems very content in it's location, where it gets full afternoon sun. I fertilize at the same time as my other palms and gets watered when nature does the work along with some deep watering when it doesn't. Soil is standard Florida Sandy loam for th first coupk inches, turning to a tannish orange sand about six inches down. It is also planted on top of a hillside that transitions to a tidal creek/river. I know everyone says you can't grow this palm in Florida and those that have tried have failed. So I have questions for those that have tried and failed ... 1. How big was the palm when it died? 2. What are signs of it starting to decline? 3. Any other factors that might have contributed to it's demise? Jubaea chilensis 6/17/21 Jubaea chilensis 6/17/21 Jubaea chilensis 11/2017
  12. 8 points
    The last one for now. Dypsis ovobontsira. Beautiful palm, fast grower. Planted from a 15 gal. back in 2017. Nice white indument and overall habit. Gonna get big. Tim
  13. 8 points
    When lobbyists run your government and politicians are the puppets, democracy is broken and you cant expect any vision of the future. Only the people can change this, and I fear things will get worse before they get better. Informed voters are needed to get this done and parroting talking points and twitter statements doesn't inform anyone. With all the garbage editorial content on the internet, todays voters are less informed than I have ever seen in my lifetime, but they often think they "know all the facts" because they have read self ascribed "fact checkers" who are often just political hacks.
  14. 8 points
    Three Dypsis hovomantsina were purchased in April 2011 from Floribunda as 4-inch pots. Potted up to 1-gallon, they eventually went in the ground in July 2014. Now, June 2021, they are getting some size. The brilliant white under the dropped frond really caught my attention. Is this a typical growth rate for you? Please share your hovomantsina stories.
  15. 7 points
    My young, seed-grown Corymbia is finally coming of flowering age. Last year it gave me two flower umbels, but this year it's getting a lot more flowers. It also just shrugs off these 110-degree days. Combretum indicum is loving this heat also. Both growing in Fresno, CA.
  16. 7 points
  17. 6 points
    I'm starting to notice more this size randomly around town. Really nice to see healthy specimens like this, fingers crossed they keep on keeping on
  18. 6 points
    Another update: We’ve got three little leaves! A fourth is popping out now as well.
  19. 6 points
    Last of the bunch.... thanks for looking! Preview attachment IMG-0675.JPGIMG-0675.JPG1.6 MB.webloc
  20. 6 points
    I didnt see this forum until recently. My name is Erika Jane. I am a palm tree and tropical garden enthusiast. Like many, my love for palm trees began with the purchase of my home in 2017. With 4 existing 30 feet tall beauties, I knew I wasn't going to tear them down! So I started looked for companion plantings. And BOOM!!!! I found the wonderful world of palm trees addicts! In 4 years i have added many species and hope to continue to add many more. with 1/3 of an acre and a great micro climate with the best of both worlds, the night time heat of the valley, the day time coastal breeze to cool things down., I'm praying I'm successful. I'm pleased to have found this group of likeminded individuals. I need to set up my account on my phone so i can upload photos. EJ
  21. 6 points
    I have solid evidence of Sabal Palmetto growing in the outer banks. Specifically in Hatteras NC. I have seen them before in the wild years ago but didn’t take any pictures and I had regretted that ever since. So I decided to go back to the site to take pictures as solid proof they still exist on the island. I have indeed 100% confirmed these are Sabal Palmetto palms that are growing there. The palmettos were limited at the site and were in much smaller amounts than the known Sabal minor that exists in the same area. I plan on writing a article on this visit with pictures and more information. I will make a new topic for this article so things don’t get flooded out. Please try to ask questions and discuss the topic on this thread instead of the article thread to keep things separate. Expect some amazing pictures and information to come on this amazing palm. Expect the article to be posted no later than next week. But to give you a little sneak peak here’s one picture I took today
  22. 6 points
    Pine mulch should be aged and composted before being used as a mulch. Freshly chopped pine mulch will cause nitrogen draw down as microbes use up nitrogen to try and break the mulch down.
  23. 6 points
    I’m going to lay the truth out there for everyone who either doesn’t know or doesn’t want to believe it true because they are so brainwashed……..WE HAVE THE DUMBEST POLITICIANS AND VOTERS IN THE NATION! Whether it be the total lack of spending money on infrastructure (i.e. aquifers to curb the never ending drought etc) to taxes, to schools, to everything else 68% of the idiots vote for here. They have permanently ruined this state and are scattering to other states to destroy them as we speak. The state is too far gone. As @Jim in Los Altos said…only 10% of the water is used by the public. Restricting our water for months and months is literally the equivalent of a days usage, if that. People who believe they would be making a difference are the same people we’ve seen for the last 15 months wearing masks while driving convertibles. Sheep
  24. 6 points
    There is nothing to worry about in Arizona. When fronds fall here,they are completely dried and weigh less than 5 pounds each. I have a few Cuban royals planted less than a foot away from my house. Fronds fall on the roof half the time and have never caused any damage. aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  25. 6 points
    I wanted to beef up my collection so I took trip to Dooms Dave's Place. This is probably an old picture knowing Google but it can give you an idea of the scope of his collection; with over 100 species in the ground. So you roll up to his place and this is what you see first.
  26. 5 points
    I love it when my torch gingers start blooming
  27. 5 points
    Thanks for reply aztopic. I have a few bigger ones that not sure of identification. The larger one with a trunk is supposed to be baileyana, the smaller trunked palm berteroana, one no trunk I am not sure of. The other is macroglossa I believe.
  28. 5 points
    Not my palms but definitely big boys
  29. 5 points
    D. prestoniana. Planted late 2009 from 1gal. Look hard, there is a shovel leaning on the palm on the left. Just monsters. Only one photo, probably should take a couple more. Tim
  30. 5 points
    Dypsis betafaka? Blue decipiens? Not clear on this one. Again planted out in 2011 from a 1 gal. Looked scraggly for a long time, but getting more attractive as time goes by. Tim
  31. 5 points
    Dypsis mananjarensis. Planted late 2011 from a small 1 gal. Took awhile for this one to get it’s legs, but getting speedy, relatively speaking. Beautiful trunk and new red emergent petiole. Tim
  32. 5 points
    Just posting to say hello. I live in Central East Florida and I am pretty new to palms. I was bitten by the bug a little less than a year ago and find myself somewhat obsessed. I’m up to about 30 different palms, mostly small and about half are from seed Ive found in planters. Anyway, looking forward to soaking up some knowledge and meeting some fellow palmophiles! -Dean
  33. 5 points
    I transplanted this Majesty double that survived 5f unprotected. Found it in the dead palm garbage at the neighbor's house.
  34. 5 points
    Encephalartos nubimontanus just starting to push a flush on the main caudex, but also a number of pups or offsets are pushing new flushes. Sometimes with pups it pushes the main caudex off to an angle away from the pup growth. In this case, the numerous pups are completely encompassing the main caudex so they haven't had room to push it sideways. It remains hard to count the various flushes around this plant, but the vertical grey/green leaves with nice stacking coming off the main caudex certainly are attractive in my opinion.
  35. 5 points
    Sorry - but things have become too political. Topic closed, but left for viewing.
  36. 5 points
    Here is an update on the filibusta at my Albuquerque house. Had to trim many dead fronds from this winter’s cold. This palm saw 7F to nights in a row.
  37. 5 points
    I planted 4, 3 gallon Sabal minor's today in an area that I am raising for erosion and flood control. When I began digging, I noticed that the dirt was made up of primarily earth worm castings and composted leaves. You can see an earth worm in the second shot, but not so clearly in the first. I used about 2 handfuls of garden soil for each planting, but it is looking like a good start. Now, to plant some Sabal uresana's next week. BTW the cat is alive and is just taking his siesta.
  38. 5 points
    Seriously how has California, with a GDP the size of 3.2 trillion, constant water shortages and rolling power blackouts, not implemented something like the Perth Wave Energy & desalination plant in Australia? They accomplished this for a couple million dollars back in 2013. The wave energy pumps ocean water into a desalination plant which is also powered by the ocean waves, and any excess energy goes to the grid.
  39. 5 points
    After living in southern(3yrs) and northern california(4yrs) last decade, it appeared only a matter of time before this happened. ~40 million people living in mostly desert/desert seacoast with very low rainfall was going to dry up the colorado sooner or later. Add in arizona and utah and nevada and you have 4 states using the water from the colorado. I feel concerned for the wildfire season as we were there in 2018 for the big fires in santa rosa area. Maybe the state should use its massive 150 billion covid funding windfall for desalination, its really the future there. But, I dont expect that, I doubt they have a vision for the future. More likely friends of politicians are already lined up.
  40. 5 points
    Never fertilize mine who wants them to grow fast I would rather have something to slow them down
  41. 4 points
    When you're trying to watch the College World Series (Hail State), you need to cook dinner, need to walk the dog, do laundry, take the trash out, etc etc But there's a nice breeze blowing and you just wanna sit outside and vibe with your palms.
  42. 4 points
    Mid June and here are some of the palms recovering from last winters 3F in Dallas.
  43. 4 points
    Finally got decent rains this week. Almost 4" in Belle Isle. And it came over 4 days so lots of soaking into the ground. Yard is looking lush!
  44. 4 points
    You are fine to use them as mulch. In fact, the sooner you use them the better it will likely be. The idea that they have a big influence acidifying the soil or draw nitrogen (as long as you don't till it into the soil) are myths that have been busted. Most university extension services are now also distributing this news. Find good sources on the web. :)
  45. 4 points
    Nice specimen. He looks happy in that spot. I have not grown a J. chilensis in the ground but I know of others who have tried. I grew a couple in pots once and they did fine and I eventually sold them because I didn't want to experiment with them in the ground. Most of the known attempts were here in S. Florida with a couple in Central Florida. Of all the conversations over the years about the attempts, I got the general idea that the palm does not like 'wet feet' and needs exceptional drainage. Specimens grow fine in the ground and do well until we get a period of heavy rain that goes on for days. Then the palm starts turning brown at the leaflet tips and continues to brown until the palm falls over or gets bud rot. I know of a single specimen in the Sarasota area that is a large rosette size in a collector's yard. I would run into the owner at sales once or twice a year and he always had new photos of the palm on his phone. It has been a couple years, but even then the palm was magnificent. From the photos, I could tell the palm is growing in a large yard all by itself; surrounded by turf grass and a small mulch bed. It was at least 7 to 8 ft. (2.1-2.4m) in height... big, burly... carrying a big upright crown, full of leaves. I can't remember if the specimen was the first attempt or if he had tried one before. When in doubt about if it will grow, try and try again. Ryan
  46. 4 points
    Someome sent me these Sabal Palmettos from the Park Land Coastal Reserve in Buxton on Hatteras Island. These were both in the middle of the coastal woods. Any possibility that first one is a remainder of the now gone Native Population? I've heard Bald Head Island palmettos grow much slower than Native Florida ones and those of course grow very slow. Could this possibly have been a seedling during the time when the native sabal palmetto on the island were cut down for their edible bud?
  47. 4 points
    This potential nitrogen drawdown is something that I have read up on a lot from various sources and talking to other gardeners. I have esablished a food forest with a deep mulch system and wanted to be sure i wouldnt deplete all the nitrogen. They key is to only apply the wood chip mulch on the surface and not mix it with the topsoil at all. Burying woodchips into the topsoil layer at all is no good (not sure why anyone would do this). But use of fresh arborist chips on the surface as mulch will have no ill effects on nitrogen as it cant draw up nitrogen out of the soil except for a tiny fraction at the surface. It will improve and nourish the soil as it breaks down.
  48. 4 points
    Arizona royal fronds usually totally dry up before falling off on their own. Here are 2 different trees getting ready to drop an old frond. aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  49. 4 points
    Because California is plagued by endless bureaucracy. Hint: check out the stupid, virtually pointless “high speed” rail project. If by “high speed” they meant “Prius speed” then ya pretty much makes sense.
  50. 4 points
    Some ankle biters from the garden and my indoor ankle biter
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