Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Jubaea_James760

    Jubaea_James760

    IPS MEMBER


    • Points

      11

    • Content Count

      617


  2. Jimhardy

    Jimhardy

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      5

    • Content Count

      1,042


  3. Fallen Munk

    Fallen Munk

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      3

    • Content Count

      603


  4. Reyes Vargas

    Reyes Vargas

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      2

    • Content Count

      681



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/07/2022 in Posts

  1. 4 points
    Not a palm but kind of looks like one, here is the Cyathea Cooperi.
  2. 2 points
    Back in April @TheMadScientist generously sent me some fresh seeds. They are already starting to pop roots! When they arrived, I put the seeds in the same composting leaf much that I had my Parajubaea torallyi seeds that I kept throwing old banana peels in an attempt to rot the fruit off. I kept them in that bucket through May and then peeled off the loose fruit and potted them up in June. I put them in the shade behind my garage and one month later and they are starting to germinate. It's been a cool spring and summer so far, so these guys like the cool temps to germinate. I can't thank @TheMadScientist enough for allowing me the opportunity to work with this species!
  3. 2 points
    With a more average winter in the books and some new stations added in to the calculations, the zone map for Florida would change slightly. The attached image is based off of the Google Map 2022_CompositeStationZones and is based off 50-year averages so it would include the 1980s.
  4. 2 points
    Haha Thanks! This one is just for you
  5. 2 points
    Sabal Palmetto Grown from seed Sabal Minor (Blountstown Dwarf) a double & my biggest. The yetti is 11.5 inches. Sabal Minor ( Blountstown Dwarf) smallest. Sabal Minor ( Chipola Dwarf) biggest. Sabal Minor ( Chipola Dwarf) smallest.
  6. 1 point
    What sort of makes me think hybrid is that the fronds are...how do i put it...kinda flat? Not sure how to put, but either way its very weird. Probably not a hybrid but just very unusual.
  7. 1 point
    I am also not seeing the feared ox beetle at all. I should have been poking them out of holes since June. I only planted drought tolerant plants, however, I am quickly discovering some are more tolerant than others. Also, a swath of plants are still establishing and need quite a lot of attention.
  8. 1 point
    If I could be there I'd do Copernicias and jubaeas and coccothrinaxes .
  9. 1 point
    Cycads make a great companion plant for palms... Most will take the same amount of sun as your tropicals without burning,and some,like Dioon edule,are absolutely bullet proof in our desert - even in full,blazing,all day sun. aztropic Mesa, Arizona
  10. 1 point
    I think you're right. Hi 108˚, Lo 70˚
  11. 1 point
    Way over trimmed, nothing looks hybrid to me. Butia’s with a big full crown look awesome. That one looks anemic to me
  12. 1 point
    Can't tell. But, I wish I could go on this bushwhacking trip with you!
  13. 1 point
    Currently 12c heading for 19c. A bit cloudy outside at the moment but there's nothing in it. Expecting 23c tomorrow before the rain comes back.
  14. 1 point
    Supposedly they transplant well as apposed to the Caribbean Copernicias which do not. I dug up my blue Copernicia alba in April and got a pretty good rootball but it hasn't pushed any growth yet so not sure if it'll make it. No luck with the B. edulis seeds yet - I think I will try to "expose the embryo" on some and see if they respond.
  15. 1 point
    That is a pretty cool specimen
  16. 1 point
    So far we've had several days approaching 100 F. I never worried about it. I just made sure they were damp and in the shade. I assumed that these would just sit dormant all summer until cooler temps in the fall. Which is probably about when they will all be showing a strap leaf in late September or early October. Every report I've come across says germination occurs in cool weather. I think people are just reporting when they see the first bit of green above ground. Actual germination is probably during warmer weather with all the action happening underground. So I wouldn't stress about warm temps as long as they stay damp and totally out of the sun.
  17. 1 point
    Please ignore that reputation!
  18. 1 point
    Latania would be much easier to keep alive than C renda. C renda not only needs constant warmth but humidity with it. Nothing short of a fully heated hothouse with high humidity will keep these alive outside the tropics I’ve found.
  19. 1 point
    That is an awesome collection.. really love the Sabals.. and that Jubaea is getting huge! You did a great job with your selections. Many of those palms I'd like to try here in my high desert... I'm colder in winter..2000 feet higher I think.. but due to our higher elevations we have similar freak snow events.. I dont think you will have any problems with those palms at all! I can't wait for future updates..
  20. 1 point
    Not sure if sulfur would help, The question is what is the soil pH. Tap water will dominate the pH of the pottiong soil, the ground may be another matter. The Mn problem might be treated with MnSO4 and some humic acid which will help chelate the nutrients. Chelated nutrients are more bio available in more of the pH range. But pH=9.5? I dont know what will be happy there. How about a water filter at the source to remove some hardness? Every place has its strengths and weaknesses even hawaii digging is hard in many places its rock, Some places in sough forida need to jackhammer holes in the ground to plant palms. Palms are cheap here but perhaps water isnt at least at the proper pH. I have plenty of sand, mulching is a vicious cycle. I have to buy more fertilizer since myu cation exchange capacity is low(in sand). Maybe delivering Fe, Mn in dilute humic acid can help compensate for pH. It should be most obvoious it help in pots. But recovery from Mn deficiency takes a while to notice change.
  21. 1 point
    I made two very quick (and ugly) illustrations. I have clay soil, and learned the hard way about amending. The problem with digging a big hole and amending the backfill to improve drainage in clay soil, is creating the "bathtub effect" Water collects in the large hole that is dug, and can't drain into the surrounding clay. The amended "good draining soil" kind of acts as a sponge, and the rootball and roots from your plant end up just sitting in a pool of water that collects in the hole the "bathtub". The roots then rot unless the plant enjoys growing in boggy conditions. The issue isn't the clay itself, but the pocket of water that gets created when you dig a hole into the clay and fill it with anything other than the clay soil that was removed. Even just plopping the rootball into an un-amended hole can create this effect, as the well draining soil in the nursery container/rootball will do the same thing. Mound planting solves this problem by allowing water to drain away from and not pool around the rootball. The plant can then put roots down directly into the clay soil and not rot in the standing water.
  22. 1 point
    A quick look at Denton, it looks like you haven't had what the rest of the state has. Also, Lake Travis is 56% full. So it is way down, and it is just the start of the drought, we have 11 more weeks of excess heat. As stated May and June here have been 2nd and 1st hottest here, and July and August, September yet to come. We will need a tropical storm to break this pattern. I am not seeing this massive growth you are referring to, because our water limps them along. We do not use surface water here, its alkaline brine. Its not great, they tolerate it, only a real rain does the growth trick.
  23. 1 point
    Absolutely.. I'm really very much overdue for an update to my entire property, but letting things grow. It's been like living in a blast furnace this summer compared to mild last year with a lot of rain, but I have been watering like crazy and I have some really impressive growth everywhere. The pictures will be quite dramatic from the ones I posted in the spring. Really appreciate the things you were able to send a few months ago. Now if only I could find a JxB for sale to add... I have a spot sitting, waiting for me to find one.
  24. 1 point
    That is a tough one to answer without qualifying it. If you are planting in a low spot that tends to pool water and will still be saturated at the current grade, then you might want to consider going higher. If your concern is just about the clay soil, and you don't get pooling of the water normally, then you can get by with less mounding. The challenge with mounding is that over time the soil may want to settle and slide away from your mound. I like to use large rocks to support the mounds I create. Normally my mounds are just a few inches in height (3" to 12") for the plants I want to provide extra drainage (mostly cycads). Wish you success with the Jubea and you will have to post some update photos of how you have planted it once completed.
  25. 1 point
    just arrived its fcking huge time to buy soil
  26. 1 point
    Carribean Palms Nursery had a few of these out in full sun. They were in sandy potting soil, and had a few ragged leaves, but were mostly adapted. I got them at 7g and planted them a few days later in full sun in November. They sat there over winter, not doing much until March, then started picking up steam. I over water and over-fertilize a lot, but my soil drains fast. These seem to do OK a little on the moist side. When it's hot and dry I water them about every other day. But I've been known to over-do at times. November 2021... July 2022... I have two in pots tucked into the understory. At 1g they were very slow. Now at 3g they are getting a little faster and stronger. They are deep green in the shade and pale and stressed looking in the sun, so I keep them in dappled light at that age. If they burn, it will be a long hard recovery, as they are slow.
  27. 1 point
    I have a friend in South Carolina that has (probably “had” by now) it in one of his palms. I’ve also heard from a nurseryman in North Carolina who says that he’s seen it there as well. Almost certainly it is being spread by people hauling Florida-grown palmettos into the Carolinas.
  28. 1 point
    my banana decided to have babies
  29. 1 point
    Boom. Planted it day 2 in the new place. Priorities LOL.
  30. 1 point
    Beautiful collection brother!! Everything I got from you earlier this year is doing well especially the blackie. Man, it's growing and every new frond is bigger, and look so good. Thank you again and your collection is beautiful! Love that Jubea.....
  31. 1 point
    My in ground Kerriodoxa did amazingly well at 24-26F for 4-5 hours with frost. It had some frost protection from the B. Alfredii above it, but I was very surprised to see little damage other than about 25% leaf burn. So far this is a much hardier palm than it looks. FWIW, here are the Kerriodoxa seedlings I received from Floribunda in May. They appear to have not buried the seed at all, growing on top of the lava rock substrate.
  32. 1 point
    I don't mind them they make a cool sound at night! And I just heard them this morning!
  33. 1 point
    Not the most photogenic photo of it. Its a coconut I brought back from Maui. Its a green variety. I may have a pic of the small grove of cocos from my old backyard on the island where it originated from. before i moved to AZ, there was a large pile of nuts that had accumulated over the years under the palms with about a quarter of them sprouted. I grabbed one with the smallest sprouts to haul back.
  34. 1 point
    I hope video will do the magic VID_20220705_104115~2.mp4
  35. 1 point
    Definitely. Surprisingly some of my Minors are keeping pace with some of the trunking Sabals I have. Most of my Sabals planted last year are still moving slow, Birmingham, Roseii, Mexicana & Cherokee Minor as well as my Uresana. I don't have my notebooks with me but I think the Uresana is on its 4th year in the ground. I'll be happy if I can get 4 leaves from my Uresana this year but with each new leave its looking beefier!
  36. 1 point
    Depends on the species.. Some are periodical ( 13, 17 year ), others annual / bi- annual.. There are at least 170 species north of Mexico. 75+ sp. here in AZ alone. Wish we had more.
  37. 1 point
    Other than un (somewhat) unexpected lack of Jubaea genes in the collection, what a wonderful selection. Thanks for sharing!
  38. 1 point
    That's all I have for now, thanks for looking.
  39. 1 point
    Copernicia Prunifera Encephalartos Cerinus Cycas Panzhihuaensis my biggest Cycas Revoulta's Dioon Edule var Queretaro my biggest Dioon Edule var Queretaro my medium size Cycas Taitungensis
  40. 1 point
    Livistona Lanuginosa Livistona Decora Livistona Nitida Serenoa Repens blue Allagoptera Arenaria Trachycarpus Wagnerianus Butia x Parajubaea Sunkha ( Patrick Schafer) Butia Yatay x Sygarus Romanzoffiana ( Patrick Schafer) wind was blowing so pics not great Phoenix Canariensis Nannorrhops Arabica Trithrinax Campestris with a hair cut. I trimmed off atleast 15-20 good leaves
  41. 1 point
    Brahea Edulis Brahea Dulcis Blue Brahea Moorei my biggest. this one is a really slow grower for me Brahea Armata Brahea Decumbens
  42. 1 point
    Sabal Minor ( SoCal) Sabal Minor (SoCal) Sabal Pumos Sabal Uresana Sabal Blackburniana
  43. 1 point
    Here are two Bougainvillea that I planted three years ago.The variety is « Violet de Meze ».It is the most resistant to cold.I’m near Paris in France.
  44. 1 point
    @aztropic said they would grow here I planted my Majesty palm!!! You can see it wanted out of its container I also took a picture of my “great soil” it is in great company a royal to one side a Beccariophoenix to one side a mule in front and a Dictyosperma behind!!
  45. 1 point
    During my visit to Pacific Palms today, I ran into this guy. Positively the largest C. Humilis “Vulcano” that I’ve ever seen. It was seeding even. Mark told me that it was sold already. Can’t even imagine what it went for either. Yikes!
  46. 1 point
    I don't mean to gatecrash this thread, but here is another Bougainvillea that is growing in east London. I don't know where else to post this besides here, and I do feel it needs to be posted. Here it is on street view in December, outside of blooming. It still appears to have a few pink flowers on it lingering into December though. I seriously doubt these Bougainvillea's have ever been protected during winter there. I suspect there's probably quite a few more lurking out there, especially around London. @SailorBold Do you protect your Bougainvillea during winter, or is it totally left to fend for itself? Also, what is the lowest temp it has taken and come back from? I don't own one myself and don't know that much about them either, but I am seriously thinking of getting one next spring now after seeing them do so well in London, unprotected. I would definitely have to protect mine here though I think, unlike in London, since I am located way out in the country with no UHI. Although I saw that you mentioned how your one came back from 15F / -9C. Is that the lowest it has seen or has it seen even lower since then? Cheers.
  47. 1 point
    Here's some Bougainvillea that has been growing in London over the past decade. I have attached the street view location too, which shows it was planted tiny sometime before 2012...
  48. 1 point
    Yeah I think that's what it was.
  49. 1 point
    Got the seeds today but the postal service did a number on the packages. I'm pretty sure I lost some seeds. Thanks anyways for your generosity. I will plant the seeds immediately.
  50. 1 point
    Beautiful pics fellas, Livistonas are magnificent palms that are in my opinion way underused.



×
×
  • Create New...