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  1. Hilo Jason

    Hilo Jason

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/23/2019 in Posts

  1. 13 points
  2. 13 points
    Walking through the yard this morning, the pachypodiums and adeniums flowering nicely. Pictures barely show the beauty. Adenium is well over 2 meters tall.
  3. 13 points
    This area is also home to many large Sausage Trees - Kigelia Africana: Thanks for looking!
  4. 12 points
    One sweltering day this past week I realized I hadn't posted any new photos since the spring. And everyone loves photos, right? So, I got to thinking about one of my favorite genera: Areca. This notoriously cold sensitive genus hails from tropical Asia and I would love to have a garden of dozens of species. But most of them of them can't survive in my climate, which breaks my heart. However, I've managed a scant few successes. Most of those are Areca catechu semi-dwarfs and dwarfs, some which I germinated myself. For some reason, the dwarfs are marginally cold hardier than the normal variety, which is rated a zone 11. I've decided to do a photo essay on the incarnations of Areca catechu. Areca catechu normal: In habitat this variety can reach 100' tall. I grew this palm from seeds, planted it last fall at the edge of my jungle just above the canal. It survived winter and is growing quickly in the heat. Note the long, thin stem, petioles and spaced out leaflets - no signs of stunting or rigid, scrunched leaves. Areca catechu semi-dwarf: Dwarfism in A. catechu occurs along a spectrum. The semi-dwarf shows subdued traits, including shortened stems and petioles and some scrunching of the leaves. I bought the palm in the following photos as a dwarf but understood it would never show extreme dwarfism. And the price was right. Was I lied to? That's in the eye of the beholder. It's a handsome palm anyway. The stem is chunkier, the leaves somewhat scrunched and petioles only 4-6" long. It stands 5-6' tall, excluding pot. Areca catechu semi-dwarf #2: I germinated this palm from semi-dwarf seeds I received from Scott Zona Areca catechu dwarf: I've owned this palm for a number of years. It is in a very large pot on a wheeled dolly set on my back lanai. If temps fall below 45F I wheel it indoors along with my other uber tropicals. The gold ring for A.c. extreme dwarfism is a total lack of a petiole. Those specimens are very rare indeed and I am still looking. The palm in the following has petioles 1/2" to 1" long, so it is close. It lives under shadecloth, which might be causing the minimal petioles. Dwarfs grown in sun have shorter petioles while those in shade "stretch out."
  5. 12 points
    Hi friends. Working in the yard today and stopped to take a pic to share From the left is Coconut Queen, Mediterranean Fan Palm, Sabal Palmetto, Butia Capitata, another Coconut Queen, Bismarck and a Washigtonia for eventual height. There's a Jubea x Butia just to the right. Keep planting!
  6. 12 points
    Just to add here Steve... (pales in comparison to Deans beautiful example) my houailou is front and center of my front yard and looking good!! Pic is more than a year ago..
  7. 11 points
    Hi Everyone. I found this beautiful old Sabal minor yesterday at a garden center in a small Free State town. It was the only one and they didn’t know what it was. They had a couple of other common cold hardy palms too. I got it for the bargain price of USD32. It is an adult plant as it is seeding.
  8. 11 points
    My wife tells me I’m starting to collect too many palms in pots on our patio. That’s crap right? Where does she get off. I mean who does she think she is? That’s grounds for divorce right? I tell her there’s way freakier people on palmtalk than me. Lin reality she’s a really good sport and handles my addiction in stride quite nicely.
  9. 11 points
    Joshue started a post lamenting the fact that he has no space () Compared to me he lives in an open savanna! Ralph Velez was my mentor when it came to cramming all you could in space you didn't have. Here's just a small portion of my succulent area in front. "Got no space"......
  10. 11 points
  11. 11 points
    Here's one in my garden that usually produces a few comments from visitors - especially PalmTalkers.
  12. 10 points
    I figured I would start a new topic giving an update on some of my palms and other things growing in a Virginia garden. Now that I've had a little more free time, I've been catching up on quite a bit of weeding and such. It's still a work in progress. Hopefully, I can get the photos to load. Ever since getting a different phone I've had some difficulties uploading photos, so trying the computer.
  13. 10 points
    One of my favorite Syagrus. It is trouble free in my beach garden. This is a group of three all planted out as strap leaved seedlings 16 years ago .
  14. 10 points
  15. 10 points
  16. 10 points
    My family and I just got back from a trip to Uganda. Even though we lived in country for a year and a half back in 2014-2015, we never made it to Murchison Falls National Park. So we took the opportunity to go there on this recent trip. Murchison Falls is in Northern Uganda, just south of the S. Sudan border and just east of the Congo border. At the top of Murchison Falls, the Nile forces its way through a gap in the rocks, only 7 metres wide, and tumbles 43 metres, before flowing westward into Lake Albert. And the below photo shows the river, after the falls, flowing on its way to Lake Albert: This area of northern Uganda is home to many Borassus aethiopum. This thread will show some of the many pictures I took in the park. Sorry some of the quality is not the greatest as I was only on my iPhone and some of these were taken while our vehicle was moving. But I hope you enjoy.
  17. 10 points
    Sonrise drive through the park to see Giraffes and many other amazing animals and Borassus! Getting stared down by a hyena:
  18. 9 points
    Had the pleasure of spending a day here today and thought I would share some lipstick habitat photos. Always was under the impression that they grew in swamps but not here. Some are found in hollows that would inundate in rain. Most in this park however grow on sand as close as 10m to the beach well above water. Colours also range from bright red to light orange Enjoy Steve Lambir Hills tomorrow. Not looking forward to the drive
  19. 9 points
    Thanks to Jeff Marcus and his amazing packaging I received my order today, everything is awesome and some of the 4" pots the palms huge in. Potting them up today, some are big enough to go right in the ground.
  20. 9 points
    The Butia odorata, Syagrus romanzoffiana, and Rhapidophyllum hystrix are the only palms visible, but there are 4 Trachycarpus fortunei in there.
  21. 9 points
    Earlier this year I ate a batch of Zahidi dates and chose to sprout the seeds. I noticed one came up variegated. How cool huh?!
  22. 9 points
    Almost 3 years since an update! I took several pics and plan to update soon... but here is the front yard as of last week..
  23. 9 points
  24. 9 points
  25. 8 points
    Hello to all, The last couple of times I have posted here on my Sylvestri palm was when it had issues. Now it's looking great w plenty of rain, sunshine and NO hard freezes last winter. Just thought I would post a positive update and say hello to everyone too. Hope everyone is doing fine, tstex



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