Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Collectorpalms

    Collectorpalms

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      281

    • Content Count

      946


  2. Silas_Sancona

    Silas_Sancona

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      246

    • Content Count

      4,546


  3. PalmatierMeg

    PalmatierMeg

    IPS MEMBER


    • Points

      197

    • Content Count

      8,596


  4. Fusca

    Fusca

    FORUM MEMBER


    • Points

      153

    • Content Count

      1,842



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/17/2021 in all areas

  1. 25 points
    I was lucky enough to spend an incredible evening at Mike's immaculate garden in Broward County, Florida. I believe he has over 700 species of palms and it's overwhelming. You can walk through it over and over again and see new things each time! Anyways, here are the photos! To see the complete album, click HERE First, here is a tribute to the native flora of the area. A beautiful Quercus virginiana (Live Oak) adorned with an amazing array of epiphytes. Calyptronoma plumeriana with burgundy petioles Tahina spectabilis getting huge Any IDea on what the ID of this Ravenea could be? Cyrtostachys renda hybrid matched my shorts! Veitchia look great when accessorized with epiphytes I hope you enjoyed the photos!
  2. 25 points
    My boy was climbing our Sabal causiarum today and it felt like a good time to post an update on this pig.
  3. 24 points
    Sort of a miniature Clino for me, which makes for a choice palm. Growing in what seems to be solid rock, which I’m sure slows it’s growth, gives it great scale and a palm to look at and not up. Nothing like the glow of a Clino crown shaft. Tim
  4. 24 points
    As usual, I took a walk through my container garden of palms and other tropicals this morning. To say I was NOT a morning person in the past is an understatement, but since I’ve become so into gardening, I can’t wait to climb out of bed before my alarm even goes off for work most of the time so I can check in on all my plants. 2020 was, as it was for most, and incredibly tumultuous year for me: COVID-19, cancer diagnosis within my immediate family, (everything turned out better than we’d hoped) cross-country move back to Florida, temporary salary cut because of the pandemic... it all added up to a slurry of stress and lost sleep that I’m sure many can identify with given the trials and tribulations of last year. I’ve always loved plants and I’ve always loved being outside. I’ve had palms in some capacity my entire life, but really being able to dive-in and get my hands dirty (literally, haha) was an absolute life-saver for me. Re-building my palm collection after a brief hiatus from FL helped me get outside, stay busy, and stay healthy both physically and mentally while avoiding large social gatherings and staying safe. You folks here at palm talk have a lot to do with that! Thank you all for all the help and advice you tirelessly provide that have allowed me to adequately care for what is now 35+ different species of palms in containers. Sadly, I’m renting this townhome and stuck with containers for now, (and seriously out of room, haha) but soon, the advice you’ve all shared will be put to work getting these puppies rooted in earth. I couldn’t help but feel proud as I looked through what I was able to accomplish and care for thanks to all of your advice and guidance. Thank you all!!!!
  5. 20 points
    Anyone else growing latania lontaroides in CA? I’ve had mine for quite a while now. Seems pretty trouble free.
  6. 17 points
    Sabal palmetto is known to have at least several variations, i.e., the spectacular 'Lisa'. But there are others Sabal palmetto 'Mocksville' - a distinctive looking variation from NC that may have extra cold hardiness Sabal palmetto 'DeFuniak Springs' - a variation from FL. Its strap leaves are quite blue Sabal etonia - I'm finally getting to try the real deal Sabal blackburniana - So, is it domingensis, bermudana, palmetto or ??? Sabal gretheriae - Hard-to-find species from the Yucatan. Note how lax the leaves are. Sabal guatemalensis - another Sabal with ID issues. Note upright leaves and l-o-n-g petioles
  7. 17 points
    I haven't been on an online forum other than Facebook in awhile. So I thought I would say just say hey. I live just north of Winston Salem, NC. in zone 7a. I mostly focus on cold hardy palms and agave. Here are a few recent pics of my yard. Followed by some taken last yr. Thanks for looking.
  8. 16 points
    The Dypsis Prestoniana Hybrid is one of my favorite plants in the garden. It is at the perfect height to really enjoy it right now. The downside to how fast it grows is that soon it will be too high up to really appreciate it. this was planted from a 2 gallon pot, less than 3 years ago! Dypsis Prestoniana are fast here, but this hybrid is a rocket. Heres a Prestoniana planted out from a 1 gallon pot about the same time. Hard to tell scale but probably 10’ tall to the tallest point. I’ll try to update this thread with some more Dypsis pictures from the garden. As time and lighting allows.
  9. 16 points
    Just thought I’d throw in a coupe more photos. These are Clinostigma samoense in a ‘wild’ part of the garden. They are loving the 80”+, (2000mm), so far this year. Glug, glug. Tim
  10. 15 points
    It’s a beautiful sunny morning here in Hilo (a nice change from an extremely wet month of March). This section of the garden was begging to be photographed in the morning sun. The three tall palms in the photo above (from left to right) are: Dypsis sp. Mayotte, Dypsis Pembana hybrid (probably w/ madagascariensis) and Dypsis Prestoniana Hybrid (also most likely crossed with Madagascariensis). In the foreground toward the left is what we are hoping is the true Dypsis Tokoravina.
  11. 15 points
    I've found that empty parking lot tree squares make good spots for guerrilla planting. They usually have or had drip systems installed, and the original planting has died for whatever reason. Sometimes,the landscapers will eventually remove your planting, and some times, they actually get stolen if too unusual for the area.Out of 18 one gallon size palms I grew from seed and planted 15 years ago at local parking lots,5 palms are still alive to this day. aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  12. 15 points
    These are one of my favorites. They grow well for me with plenty of water and fertilizer. This was originally planted in probably 2015 or 2016 and was in a 2 gallon pot with 3 others. I let them all grow in the ground for a year or two but then decided to edit out 3 of the 4 so that I could get a big, fat trunk going. Show off your Majesty Palms!
  13. 15 points
    not mentioned in the video, but my favorite phrase, ...'orographic rainfall' https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-australia-56452910
  14. 14 points
    I’ve got lots of palms closer to my house than that and I’ve never had a problem. Each palm has grown out slightly away from the wall and has cleared the eaves, barely.
  15. 14 points
    I believe this Dypsis is most likely a hybrid, if so, the seeds won’t be viable. But I’m going to attempt to germinate some just in case.
  16. 13 points
    Pics of my two savoryanums from east Hawaii Island, fronds reach up to 7 or 8 feet. These aren't large enough yet to teach me the subtle morphological differences from other Clinostigma species that I am growing: warburgii, harlandii, exorrhizum, ponapense, and gronophylum. However, the ID is from Floribunda, my source for them, so should be reliable.
  17. 13 points
    I don’t know if this is common for pritchardia but I’m not sure which one this is. I got it as pritchardia hillebrandii var. ula’ula. It has a red blush to the newly opened leaves and then fades to green. Does anyone else have this one?
  18. 13 points
    Quick shot illuminated by the light of the setting sun tonight.
  19. 13 points
    A few days before the eruption.
  20. 12 points
  21. 12 points
    Took a trip out to a Washingtonia filifera oasis this month. I highly recommend it. Easily accessible with some monster specimens.
  22. 12 points
    So this last winter I let one of my Butia x Jubaea x Queen out for a winter test here in Mukilteo Washington Z8B. Well its good to know it took snow, a few nights of 20s F cold.and rain with no protection. Good to know this one is a great candidate for this area. Pic 3 is today. Took Pacific Northwest lickin and is still tickin
  23. 12 points
    One month's worth of growth on an 8-ft robusta in the Houston Heights area, lowest temp was 14f. Photos taken exaclt 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, and 4 weeks after the worst day of the freeze. This one is storming back to life!
  24. 12 points
    Some photos from Bunya Mtns, Qld including bunya pines, hoop pines and some other interesting plants.
  25. 12 points
    I was stranded in Bali when Mt Agungn erupted in 2017
  26. 11 points
    I’ll close with some companion plantings. Ravenala madagascariensis, Travelers (not really a) palm with a large tree fern. The very tall (40-50 ft) tree ferns give the whole place the feel of dinosaur habitat. Very few places in the developed world can grow these. Non-native tree ferns are controversial in Hawaii because of their potential to escape cultivation and become invasive weeds. But I love them. HTBG has a large collection of rare heliconias. Not many were blooming on this visit, but they are often spectacular. So on your next visit to the Big Island, be sure to see HTBG for yourself. Maybe you will catch a sunny day.
  27. 11 points
    Maybe Areca catechu alba Orange Areca vesteria. These are pretty high. Used a telephoto lens to get a closeup. Red Areca vesteria Cyrtostachys renda. Again, these are on the tall side. Camera is pointing up. A recently added Neoveitchia storckii A group of Normanbya normanbyi A small Johannesteijsmannia altrifons
  28. 11 points
    I’ve been mulching since before there were palms in the ground. Now, there’s a jungle of palms and other plants competing for water and nutrients but they all are getting along.
  29. 11 points
    This palm is in the original container, a plastic pot 15cm dia. x 18 cm tall (6x7"). The trunk is 203 cm tall (80"), and the crown is 30cm (12"), for a grand total of 251 cm (99"), equalling the room height. The trunk has 128 leafbase scars. This species is one of the few that can be 'mossed' to induce adventitious roots higher up. Then the top can be cut off and re-started shorter. At first I planned to do that, but as time passed, I found it more interesting to see how high this palm could go! Another one of similar size has died, so I will re-start this one soon. (Besides, it's getting too tall for my greenhouse! C. metallica is amenable to air layering. I reduced the height of this palm by half. Look for a node that already has some hint of adventitious roots. I used a very well-designed specialty pot. www.rooterpot.com
  30. 11 points
    First time event in my back yard jungle! My only Archonotophoenix myolensis has the brightest red seeds I have seen in a long time. This native of the Atherton Tableland in Queensland, Australia, may be the rarest species in the genus, according to Palmpedia, and it is endangered. I don't know how many exist in the US. http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Archontophoenix_myolensis It is by far the smallest and most petite of my Archos and I am excited to have seeds to pass on. See photos below: Uncleaned and cleaned seeds Infructescense on palm Photos of Mother Palm
  31. 11 points
    It's Sabal photo time! A dozen years ago a topic on any Sabal palms would have sparked yawns or sneers. Back then on PT the topic du jour was Dypsis, Dypsis, Dypsis, 24/7, 365 days a year. An island in the Indian Ocean was flooding the world with hundreds and hundreds of Dypsis palms and people were going mad. Well, not actually that many hundreds because each Dypsis species had a minimum of eight names each. And Kew recognized none of them. Good times. That was then. Most palm lovers have come to the realization that of the estimated 2,500 species of palms in the world, 92% of them are not Dypsis and perhaps some of the less exalted genera were worthy of notice. Which brings me back to Sabals. And photos. I decided to update my photo library with photos of the Sabals on my Garden Lot. Many of them are what I call "uber dwarfs", the tiny varieties of Sabal minor named for the towns nearest where they were discovered. They have all the tenacious cold hardiness of their full-size cousins in a much smaller package. Sabal minor 'Blountstown Dwarf' - the original uber dwarf that introduced me to the variability of this species. At least one of the little palms in the flower box will flower for the first time. Sabal minor 'Chipola Dwarf' - slightly larger uber dwarf Sabal minor 'Wakulla Dwarf' - about the same size as Blountstown but is 60-70 miles south in FL's Big Bend Sabal minor 'High Springs' - another slightly larger uber dwarf Sabal minor 'Welfare' - A Texas S. minor found only near the ghost town of Welfare. How cool is that? It is notable for forming a short trunk
  32. 11 points
    Holy Jubaea! It’s alive!
  33. 11 points
    Well I got up this morning to thick fog and mist and about 16C with 100% RH. The fog didn’t lift until around 9.30am but it just reminded me of a cloud forest environment especially when I looked at my Parajubaeas which come from the Andes. So I took some pics. The trees were also dropping a lot of condensed water like rain in the rainforest area whenever the slightest breeze went through. I’m really happy that the trees were acting like rainforest trees. Really beautiful morning. Now in the afternoon it’s about 26C and very humid.
  34. 11 points
    Was just noticing how big this thing is getting.
  35. 11 points
  36. 11 points
    Here's one I planted at my in-laws place. It doesn't get watered or fertilized (neither does the lawn, which turns brown in the dry season). It grows slower than the ones that I take care of, but it looks perfectly healthy despite the neglect. I just planted one in a neighbor's yard, and the first foot of soil was like loose beach sand due to our recent lack of rain. I'll be taking jugs of water to it to keep it going until the rainy season starts, but once it's established I'll leave it alone. As long as this species isn't bothered too much by lethal bronzing or palmetto weevil, I think it'll be one of the most carefree palms for Florida.
  37. 11 points
    If there was GW remember that you would be under water...so no.
  38. 10 points
    Edge of the Archontophoenix forest. A quartet of Pigafetta that are probably close to 100 ft (30m) tall. The crowns of fronds are quite large. They only look tiny because they are so high. Not far behind is a trio of Veitchia joannis that are maybe 80 ft (25m) high. Dan Lutkenhouse Sr. apparently loved Licuala grandis more than just about anything else. Dozens are growing in the garden. They resemble Sabinaria but without the slit dividing the circular fronds. I didn't see many other Licuala species in the collection. Another unlabeled Licuala. Kerridoxa elegans is about 12 ft (4 m) tall. I think this is a Corypha. The fronds are about 8-10 ft (3 m) in diameter. It is planted away from the trail, so it hard to get a clear photo.
  39. 10 points
    There is a small grove of maybe half dozen Phoenicophorium borsigianum around a lily pond. These are about 30 feet (10 m) tall. I don’t know where else you could find trees of this size outside the Seychelles. Another Seychelles favorite is Verschaffeltia splendida, probably over 40 ft (13m) tall. Once they get really tall, the entire leaves get torn by the wind. Finishing up the Seychelles species with Deckenia nobilis. The sheath holding the developing inflorescence always reminds me of Audrey 2 from Little Shop of Horrors. Chambeyronia macrocarpa from New Caledonia. Carpoxlylon macrospermum from Vanuatu. This is an exceptionally beautiful species. From comments on PT it seems that the perfect microenvironment is needed to grow this in California and Florida. It thrives in Hawaii where you can count on them to develop a distinctive swollen base.
  40. 10 points
    So I've been lurking here and getting involved periodically but haven't officially gotten a chance to say hello. We're just north of Dallas and build our dream pool and backyard last year (still have more to do) and with that, I've always wanted palms.. We are new to Texas, and where we're from (IL) we'd never be able to have much of anything... so here we are! We have a little bit of land so I'm doing my best to add palms where possible. This will serve as my official progress thread as well. We finished the pool in October, and originally planted five Windmills and three Sabal Texana (small size). Lost one windmill during the storm, jury still out on the Texana. Pool area to enjoy the summer heat. Trachy on the right of picture, and there are five Chamaerops humilis before the waterfall. They're young but we're patient to watch them grow. Trachy looks rough but growing a new spear so think we're good. Pygmy Date Palm poolside Rest of the Trachys. They took a beating but appear to be doing fine now. Small Sabal Birmingham We cleared out a bunch of stuff from the back of our property that gets great sun and put down 2x Sabal Birminghams and 2x W. Robustas. 3x Pindos, 3x Sabal Majors Pindo and filiferas
  41. 10 points
  42. 10 points
    Here you may find how my supermarket bought coconut developed in 5 years time. Enjoy
  43. 10 points
    Survived neglect and historic cold. However it has no local friend to pollinate with. Both Nanus I have seen in Texas, both eventually got a trunk of 2 ft
  44. 10 points
    Update on my cocos, it has resumed rapid growth. There are 3 new fronds in the center. The trunk also appears to be continuing to gain height. Happy to report that it looks like I did manage to keep it alive through a super cool December and several frost/freeze events.
  45. 9 points
    As the clock counts down the final days here in Arizona, and more of the house is boxed up, some final scenes from some of the special places i've had the opportunity to explore while living here, while still in town. While not sizzling through another summer will be welcomed, other things enjoyed in the time here will be missed until the next opportunity to return and explore more comes. In part 1, some spring scenes from a favorite neighborhood escape, Veteran's Oasis Park. A gem in the heart of Chandler. As referenced to in the past, this 117 acre park also serves as a ground water recharge site and is a big draw for local.. and not so local birders and has boasted several sightings of extremely rare birds that pass through. The park offers up a fishing lake, numerous paved and more natural grit and gravel trails, and an environmental education center.. all with views of the San Tan Mountains ( and Regional Park ) and more distant views of the Superstitions/ mountains to the east ( esp. on clearer, less dusty days ) from atop one of the two easy to hike hills in the park. Plant diversity within the park is decent, though there is plenty of opportunity to " add more to the palate ", so to say. Can see a few Montezuma Cypress, and regionally native Ficus -from further south in Sonora or Baja- hanging out on the natural bank of the fishing lake, or near one of the recharge ponds.. along with group plantings of Brahea / Sabal Uresana here and there.. ( Plenty of the other palms in surrounding neighborhoods ) among other thoughts.. Regardless, a great spot to enjoy a picnic, or simply take in " suburban " nature, not too far removed from the less tamed desert nearby. Spring flowers: Opuntia englemannii var. lindheimeri ' Seguin ' Opuntia " Santa Rita " ( pic. # 1 ) One of the larger, single specimens i've seen locally. Yerba Mansa, Anemopsis californica. Tough but very tropical looking desert oasis native. Sunny yellow start of Palo Verde Season.. A nice patch of Chuparosa, Beloperone, ** formally Justicia** californica. The two forms of Brittlebush, Encelia farinosa.. Typical form w/ yellow disc flowers, E. f. farinosa ( pic. #1 ) and E. f. phenicodonta with dark brown disc flowers ( pic. #2 ). One of a few decent Fremont Cottonwood, Populus fermontii scattered around the fishing lake/ recharge ponds. What a sight local rivers would have been before so much of the riparian woodlands lining them, inc. tall Cottonwoods were chopped down/ water diverted. Random pics. and the desert stream/ waterfall i wish was rolling through my backyard, lol.
  46. 9 points
    I think this was my first visit to Fairchild Tropical Garden, June 1977. Not a good photo--I was doing better Kodachromes with my Minolta, but it's enough to give a feel for how the famous group looked back then. Me? I moved to Wyoming in April 1978
  47. 9 points
    I encountered difficulties with posting photos, so here the are, via comments.
  48. 9 points
  49. 9 points
    I think it will be fine. I try not to put thick mulch against to trunk but about 6 inches away I make it thicker sometimes up to 6 inches thick. I would pull some away from the trunk and just leave a thin layer and make it thicker away from it so it doesn't cause fungus on the palm.
  50. 9 points
    Built a miniature treehouse (approx 1:48 scale) for a pair of c. elegans I've had for a while. The base structure of the treehouse is a balsa wood kit I bought on Etsy that I then added my own accessories to. I always love imagining I'm a tiny explorer in my huge plants, like Zac in FernGully. Here's the link for the kit: https://www.etsy.com/listing/673224150/amazing-plant-house-miniatuur-boomhuis?gpla=1&gao=1&&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=shopping_us_fathers_day_All_Products&utm_custom1=_k_EAIaIQobChMI6ufkhbvx7wIVUQZ9Ch3G2gCLEAQYASABEgK-n_D_BwE_k_&utm_content=go_1707961842_69268681569_331635230091_aud-406953526999:pla-293946777986_c__673224150_12768591&utm_custom2=1707961842&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6ufkhbvx7wIVUQZ9Ch3G2gCLEAQYASABEgK-n_D_BwE
×
×
  • Create New...