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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/19/2021 in all areas

  1. 36 points
    Pretty standard 1/4 acre. Lots of palm density. I left a few genus out of my list like Jubaeopsis and Polyandrococcos. Here are a few garden shots...
  2. 26 points
    "You know you are a palm nut when..." - ... you have palm seeds germinating in your car's cup holder. - ... there are coconuts rolling around in the bed of your truck and you don't remember where you got them. - ... you take a palm book with you on a long flight. - ... you have a bucket of common palm seed in the back of your car, along with all the groceries. - ... you bring a wagon, wheel barrow, cart with you to a palm sale, along with a cooler loaded with a day's worth of drinks. - ... you take 75 photos of the same palm. - ... your pocket list of the species you have is replaced by a list of the species you want. - ... your pocket list of the species you want is replaced by nothing, because you have it memorized. - ... you've knocked on a stranger's door asking to collect seed from their yard. - ... you have given a palm as a birthday gift. - ... you have received a palm as a birthday gift. - ... you stop to identify a palm while riding your bike. - ... you bought a palm because it looked cool, only to find you have four more like it at home. - ... you have created your own style of hieroglyphic writing to identify the origins of all your palm seed via their tags. - ... you have a 1-gallon palm sitting within the rim of a 7-gallon palm which is sitting within the rim of a 25-gallon palm. - ... you need to use a flashlight to give a tour of your yard, at two o'clock in the afternoon. - ... the utility meter reader is scared to death of entering your property. - ... you've had to pull a dead animal from the spines of your heavily armed palm. - ... you've had to pull yourself from the spines of your heavily armed palm. - ... you have forgotten where you have planted a certain specimen. - ... you find a palm in your yard you do not remember planting. - ... you clean out the marginal area between your yard and your neighbor's only to find seedlings of ten different species. - ... after the garden tour, you need to draw a map to get the attendees to the exit. - ... the space between your potted palms has shrunk to zero. - ... the seedlings popping up in the yard, belong to a mature tree above, which was once a seedling itself, belonging to an even taller palm higher up. - ... you dream of palms, awake and while sleeping. - ... you can see the crown of your climbing palm and have no idea where it is planted. - ... you have generations of hybrid palms creating themselves in your yard. - ... you can't find the tags you used to label your palms, because they were replaced by another system of tags which you cannot find either. - ... your cold sensitive palms are better protected than your pets. - ... you have created a custom moving system to transport your oversized Red Sealing Wax Palm indoors and away from the cold. - ... you have no hot water because it's been diverted outside to heat your yard. - ... you have Christmas lights around your palms, weeks after December. - ... you talk to your palms and hope they don't talk back. I could keep going, but I gotta eat. Ryan
  3. 26 points
    Stopped to take some pictures while mowing the grass.
  4. 23 points
    5 years ago I made my first Palmtalk post about my front garden, using a water rebate program from the state. The full post is here: Well, it's been five years and things have grown! I did add some things as well, but not as much as it appears. I hope you enjoy!
  5. 21 points
    This is what you buy for yourself for your birthday. My wife shaking her head in disbelief that I'd buy more palms.
  6. 21 points
    Thought I’d share a few photos of this handsome palm from Fiji. The crown shaft color is a dark chocolate to almost black. The only drawback is having to look up at them. Super tropical looking and fast growing. Please post more photos! Tim
  7. 19 points
    I have been growing cold hardy palms for about 15 years ...i have had my mule palm in ground for about 7 years now . I've noticed it's gotten more hardy as time has gone on .
  8. 18 points
    Way too many separate species to list but I will mention some of the genus. About 300 palms and about 120 separate species total. Many are adult palms and many adolescent. 50+ Archontophoenix 2 Arenga 2 Beccariophoenix 1 Bismarkia 3 Brahea 1 Butia 3 Burretiokentia 3 Caryota 5 Ceroxylon 1 Coccothrinax 60+ Chamaedorea 4 Chamaerops 8 Chambeyronia 5 Cyphophoenix 11 Dypsis 3 Geonoma 13 Howea 4 Kentiopsis 7 Livistona 4 Parajubaea 22 Phoenix 3 Prestoea 7 Pritchardia 9 Raphis 6 Ravenea 6 Rhopalostylis 1 Roystonea 1 Sabal 12 Syagrus and Syagrus hybrids 1 Thrinax 5 Trachycarpus 2 Trithinax 2 Wallickia 1 Wodyetia 1 Wodyetia x Veitchia ...and a few others.
  9. 17 points
  10. 17 points
    Here's a Pseudophoenix sargentii I grew from seed started about 20 years ago. They do well in the desert,but seem to grow much slower than under tropical conditions. Finally got it's first trunk ring,so growth should be speeding up at this point. I've grown dozens of this species and until a trunk is formed,I only get 1 new frond produced each year.After trunk formation,2 or 3 new fronds per year is the norm. aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  11. 17 points
    Mine was exact same size in 2016. Here's what it looks like today
  12. 16 points
    When I saw this, I thought I was going to need a pacemaker. In all my years looking at palm parts and pieces, I have never seen anything quite like it. John Hovancsek and I were going through the garden when I removed an old leaf sheath off this Dypsis basilonga only to reveal the first spathe since planting. In this case, a picture is worth much more than a thousand words. Tim
  13. 16 points
    I thought I would share an update of about 5 years of growth for my Bizzy. I planted it in July 2016 from a 5 gal. The other picture is from today where it is starting to truck. I was not sure how quickly it would grow but I think that it is doing quite well.
  14. 16 points
    Welp…. The slightest hint of a good deal + seeing something I rarely come across was all I needed. Go to Lowe’s at 7:00pm on a Thursday for a $3 terra cotta pot, come home with a palm… par for the course. Hahaha
  15. 15 points
    We obtained Tahina spectabilis seed from the first batch that was offered and received them in April 2008, We have planted 7 Tahina palms at Leu Gardens from this seed batch. Almost all of them were planted near other Madagascar natives. 1. acc# 090230, planted July 2009, located in the Palm Garden, growing next to a Hyphaene coriacea (formerly H. shatan) from Madagascar seed.
  16. 15 points
    This species captured my heart. It is so elegant, so perfectly proportioned; the palm equivalent of a classic tuxedo, I had to line my driveway with them.
  17. 15 points
    A new palm garden still under construction and yet to be tidied and landscaped so the quality of some of the pictures is not doing the justice it might. A mix of cold hardy palms that are familiar and need no introduction and were imported from my English garden where they were kept in pots. Followed by a work in progress selection of purchases of palms that were (mostly) not suited to the UK but can be grown in my new garden in a 10b zone Imports: Existing palms: on buying the house Two tall Washingtonia New palm purchases: Potted inside the porch Chamaedorea Metallica Syagrus schizophylla Archontophoenix Cunninghamania Nuresery seedlings acclimatizing before being put outside full-time: Dypsis Leptocheilos Newly planted palms from recent purchases Queen palm assortment Ravanea Rivularis (Majesty Palm) Brahea Armata (and Rita the dog!) Another Majesty and Queen palm (there are Chamaedorea hooperiana and radicalis under the gazebo which can't be seen clearly in first picture) Wodyetia bifurcata (Foxtail) seedling: Juvenile Livistona decipiens: Another juvenile Livistona decipiens and Seronoa repens There are others, but that will do for the time being
  18. 15 points
    Great "little" palm. Planted two back in 2005. They are doing great here in my almost desert. So are the weeds. LOL Pictured are 2008 and last November.
  19. 14 points
    this is not the place for the therapy i need. species..stopped counting at 700 total count..2000 or so
  20. 14 points
    Always a treat to my eyes. Just wanted to share my largest specimen. This one came from the late George Sparkman several years ago
  21. 13 points
    Gotta say, a lot of you simultaneously make me feel MORE sane (I’m used to being “the plant guy” in my circle of friends.) and LESS sane. (I know given more time, I’ll be right there up there among the longest of lists in this thread!) Since August of last year, my humble little container garden has grown to include the following species: Kentiopsis oliviformis Licuala peltata var. sumawongii Licuala grandis Licuala peltata Licuala yal braal Cocos Nucifera (x2) Crytostachys renda Areca vestiaria (x4) Rhapsis excelsa Chamaedorea cataractarum Chamaedorea elegans (x5) Chamaedorea radicalis (x5) Kerriodoxa elegans Polyandrococos / allagoptera caudescens Washingtonia robusta Ravenea rivularis (x2) Bismarckia nobilis (x2) Mule palm Livistona chinensis Sabal causiarum Beccariophoenix alfredii Butia odorata Coccothrinax crinita Chambreyonia macrocarpa Archontophoenix alexandrae (x6) Archontophoenix cunninghamiana (x3) Archontophoenix purpurea Archontophoenix myolensis (x10+, seedlings) Archontophoenix maxima (x10+, seedlings) Dypsis leptocheilos Dypsis Lutescens Dypsis pembana (x10+, seedlings) Howea forsteriana (x3) Syagrus romanzoffiana Copernicia fallaensis Satakentia lieukensis Serenoa repens (silver) Roystonea regia Ptychosperma elegans (x10+, seedlings) Trachycarpus fortunei Only the front pictured. I don’t have any recent photos of the back of my townhome at this moment, haha.
  22. 13 points
    I have been growing cold hardy palms for about 15 years ...i have had my mule palm in ground for about 7 years now . I've noticed it's gotten more hardy as time has gone on .
  23. 13 points
    Hope this list from Excel works...99 different palms in the ground. Eleven more coming in tomorrow and say 1/2 dozen in the green house. Still lots of room for more here on the 2 acres.. These are all planted at least 6 feet apart more like in a botanical garden than a jungle. Adonidia merrillii (7) Archontophoenix alexandrae Areca catechu Areca oxycarpa Arenga australasica Arenga engleri Arenga micrantha Arenga microcarpa Arenga pinnata Attalea cohune Beccariophoenix alfredii Beccariophoenix madagascariensis Butia yatay Calyptrocalyx hollrungii (2) Caryota mitis Chamaedorea elegans (1 clump) Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti Chamaedorea geonomiformis (DIED) Chamaedorea metallica (3) Chamaedorea microspadix (2) Chamaedorea seifrizii (3 CLUMPS) Chambeyronia macrocarpa (2) Chuniophoenix nana Clinostigma savoryanum Coccothrinax barbadensis Coccothrinax crinita Coccothrinax miraguama Copernicia alba Copernicia baileyana Cyrtostachys renda (3) Dictyosperma album Dypsis Bejouf- Dypsis cabadae Dypsis decaryi Dypsis lanceolata Dypsis lastelliana Dypsis leptocheilos Dypsis lutescens Dypsis mayotte (2) Dypsis pembana Dypsis robusta Dypsis rosea Euterpe sp "Orange Crownshaft" Gaussia maya (3) Howea forsteriana (1 single) (1 clump of 4) Hyophorbe indica Hyophorbe lagenicaulis Hyophorbe verschaffeltii Hyphaene coriacea Itaya amicorum Jubaeopsis caffra Licuala grandis Licuala spinosa Livistona chinensis Livistona mariae Loxococcus ripicola Lytocaryum weddellianum Neoveitchia storckii Phoenix dactylifera (3) Phoenix roebelenii (10) Phoenix sylvestris Phytelephas macrocarpa Pinanga coronata Pinanga maculata Pritchardia arecina Pritchardia beccariana Pritchardia hardii Pritchardia martii Pritchardia minor Pritchardia munroi Pritchardia remota (2) Pritchardia schattaueri Pseudophoenix ekmanii Pseudophoenix sargentii Pseudophoenix vinifera Ptychosperma cuneatum (died) Ptychosperma Elegans Ptychosperma macarthurii Ptychosperma (2 unknowns) (clumping) Ravenea hildebrandtii Rhapis excelsa Roystonea oleracea Roystonea regia Sabal mexicana Sabal minor Sabal palmetto Sabal rosei Sabal uresana Syagrus amara Syagrus botryophora Syagrus coronata Syagrus romanzoffiana (3) Syagrus sancona (2) Thrinax radiata (2 clumps) Veitchia arecina (6) Veitchia joannis Veitchia unknown (out house) Welfia Regia Wodyetia bifurcata
  24. 13 points
    Evidently Palms R Kool isn’t the only palm nut in his neighborhood:
  25. 13 points
    A few non- cactus flowers around the yard atm.. primarily out front. Stuff out back has been very sporadic so far this year. Guaiacum coulteri. Mature, potted specimens out back have been very shy flowering so far this year. The specimen out front has flowered twice. Odd, lol Cordia parvifolia Calliandra californica. Cactus peeking above it on the left is Stenocereus stellatus. Caesalpinia mexicana **Now Erythrostemon mexicanus** Senna covesii, Some of the smaller plants anyway. Big specimen is taking a break atm. Dichrostachys cinerea.. Not the original specimen i had but a sucker that had rooted into the ground next to the pot some time ago. Despite the reputation for this tree to be thorny, this specimen has yet to produce many.
  26. 12 points
    Central Indiana needle palms. In ground 6-6-21.
  27. 12 points
    I drove 800 miles by myself in a truck with no AC and a manual transmission in one day to obtain a better form of a palm species I already had in my garden.
  28. 12 points
    Pretty new to the forums and been lingering but wanted to show my progress on the front yard. Four months ago, the entire front was dirt. No wall, no planters etc so I’ve been busy. All Palms have been procured locally by various parties. Comments and suggestions are greatly appreciated. -North Facing house -Huntington Beach,CA -approx 1 mile from the beach -clay like soil needed to be heavily amended obviously -Grass will be put in the middle of the yard Pic #2: Cycas Circinalis, Rhopalostylis Cheesmanii, Howea Belmoreana, Dypsis Lanceolata Pic #3: Chambeyronia Hookeri, Rhopalostylis Oceana Pic #4: Chambeyronia Macrocarpa Watermelon (looks terrible as it was taken from almost green house location but is def growing much better now that it’s in the ground), Chameadorea Plumosa (not planted yet), 5G Dypsis Onilahensis / Dypsis Lanceolata / Dypsis Hybrid (?), Bismarckia Nobilis, Plumeria (Pink/Orange/white)
  29. 12 points
    Here are specimens 5 and 6, planted in April 2012, growing in the Tropical Stream Garden and flanking a Bismarckia nobilis
  30. 11 points
    I’m in zone 6b Ohio so I’m pretty limited in what I can pull off here. Here’s what I have planted in the ground. 1 Rhapidophyllum Hystrix 4 Sabal Minor 1 Sabal Causiarum 2 Trachycarpus Fortunei (supposed to be the variant Winsan) 10+ Chamaedorea Radicalis 1 Washingtonia Robusta 1 Syagrus Romanzoffiana The Washingtonia and Syagrus hasn’t been through a winter here and I doubt they’ll make it but I’m still giving it a shot. Also not palms but I have 2 Cycas Revoluta that have been in the ground for 4 years.
  31. 11 points
    This forum can easily be called "Palm-aholics Anonymous", but instead of curing you, it enables you to buy more palms.
  32. 11 points
    On the advice from my lawyer, I take the 5th to not self incriminate myself to my wife.
  33. 11 points
    1/4 acre Cold Hardy Palm garden - all in ground with additional species growing out in pots Butia eriospatha - 1 Butia odorata - 1 Jubaea chilensis - 3 Butiagrus - 1 Sabal minor - 5 Sabal brazoria - 1 Sabal louisiana - 2 Sabal uresana - 2 Sabal causiarum - 2 Sabal palmetto - 2 Chamaedorea microspadix - 10 Chamaedorea radicalis - 9 Trachycarpus takil - 1 Trachycarpus wagnerianus - 2 Trachycarpus latisectus - 1 Trachycarpus princeps - 2 Trachycarpus fortunei - 33 Rhapidophyllum hystrix - 7 Serenoa repens - 1 Livistona nitida - 1 Livistona chinensis - 2 Chamaerops humilis - 3 Chamaerops humilis "argentea" - 3 Washingtonia robusta - 1 Brahea armata - 1 97 palms representing 25 species. Plus two unknown seedlings - One is a Sabal of some sort and the other I think might be a Trachycarpus. They could be from leftover ungerminated seed.
  34. 11 points
    Nothing like American Chopper memes to parody our passion:
  35. 11 points
    Update June 3rd 2021..
  36. 11 points
    Here's a pic I took while visiting Leonel Mera's farm in the Dominican Republic last year. These were purposely planted as seedlings next to each other to show the difference of a standard Pseudophoenix sargentii left, and the var.on the right. You can see that the var.has outpaced the standard due to the difference in growth ring spacing. aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  37. 11 points
    This tree I bought from Kevin weaver as a liner . Solid white when I first got it . I potted it in a 1 gallon were it sat for a year . Then I decided to plant it . Here it is now . This palm takes zero care . It has a drip line plant and forget it . It’s about 3 and half foot tall now I’ve had it for 4 years . Let’s see some others !!
  38. 11 points
    2. acc# 150613, planted July 2015, located in the Palm Garden, located near a grouping of Bismarckia and a Beccariophoenix alfredii
  39. 11 points
    Sweet Len!!! Looks like ours are still about the same size with mine lagging a bit. I suspect yours is growing faster because it's getting more sun. To answer the sun question on these I can say that 9 miles inland SoCal and these things can take full all day sun from a young age. Mine was growing quite fast but as the canopy filled in around it, it has slowed down. I trimmed off a huge tree branch that was smothering it so I think it appreciates the room to spread its arms now. But the shape of the crown on this palm is spectacular.
  40. 11 points
    Here are a few photos from a April or May 2007 trip.
  41. 10 points
    I think I’ve cracked 100 species (counting separate varieties) now. Most of which are in the ground but some are far from proven long term here and have only been through a winter or two. The A vestarias and C elegans are indoors, but everything else is outside. I’ve got multiple of some species in the ground but usually only 1 and no more than 6 of anything (A myolensis, A cunninghamiana). Allagoptera caudescens Archontophoenix alexandrae Archontophoenix cunninghamiana Archontophoenix cunninghamiana x Alexandrae Archontophoenix myolensis Archontophoenix purpurea Archontophoenix tuckeri Areca vestaria red Areca vestaria orange Arenga engleri Bismarckia nobilis Burretiokentia hapala Brahea armata Brahea decumbens Brahea dulcis Brahea calcarea Brahea super silver Caryota maxima var. ochlandra Caryota obtusa Ceroxylon echinulatum Ceroxylon parvifrons Ceroxylon parvum Ceroxylon quindiuense Ceroxylon ventricosum Chamaedorea anemophila Chamaedorea arenbergiana x nationsiana Chamaedorea brachypoda Chamaedorea cataractum Chamaedorea elatior Chamaedorea elegans Chamaedorea ernestii- augusti Chamaedorea glaucifolia Chamaedorea hooperiana Chamaedorea microspadix Chamaedorea oblongata Chamaedorea radicalis Chamaedorea seifrizii (Florida Form) Chamaedorea tepejilote (solitary) Chamaedorea tepejilote clumping form Chamaedorea woodsoniana Chamaerops humilis var argentea Chambeyronia macrocarpa var. flavopicta Chambeyronia macrocarpa var. hookeri Chuniophoenix hainanensis Coccothrinax barbadensis var dussiana Coccothrinax fragrans Coccothrinax proctorii Cyphophoenix elegans Cyphophoenix nucele Dictyosperma album var rubrum Dypsis ambositrae Dypsis arenarum Dypsis baronii Dypsis baronii black petiole Dypsis basilonga Dypsis cabadae x madagascariensis Dypsis decaryi Dypsis decipiens Dypsis lanceolata Dypsis leptocheilos Dypsis lutescens Dypsis madagascariensis Dypsis malcomberi Dypsis pembana x madagascariensis Dypsis pilulifera Dypsis prestoniana hybrid Dypsis psammophila Dypsis rosea Dypsis santlucei Euterpe edulis orange crownshaft Guassia maya Hedyscepe canterburyana Howea belmoreana Howea forsteriana Jubaea chilensis Jubaeopsis caffra Kentiopsis oliviformis Laccospadix australasica solitary Laccospadix australasica clumping Lanonia magalonii Licuala ramsayi Licuala spinosa Linospadix minor Linospadix monostachya Livistona alfredii Livistona fulva Livistona nitida Oraniopsis appendiculata Parajubaea sunkha Parajubaea torallyi Pritchardia hillebrandii Pritchardia maideniana Pritchardia martii Pritchardia napaliensis Ravenea glauca Ravenea rivularis Rhapis excelsa variegata Rhapis humilis Rhopalostylis baueri var. baueri Rhopalostylis baueri var. cheesmanii Rhopalostylis sapida little barrier island Rhopalostylis sapida var Oceana Rhopalostylis sapida var Fine Leaf Sabal mauritiformis Sabal minor Schippia concolor Syagrus hoehnii Syagrus sancona Syagrus schizophylla Syagrus weddeliana Trachycarpus sp (probably fortunei) Trachycarpus princeps Wallichia disticha Washingtonia robusta Most are still on the small side, the garden is only 18 months old. Here’s a pic of the C macrocarpa var flavopicta from the kitchen window.
  42. 10 points
    I guess I can ask for forgiveness now... Acoelorraphe wrightii x 2 Actinokentia divaricata x 3 Archontophoenix cunninghamiana x 3 Archontophoenix myolensis x 3 Archontophoenix purpurea Archontophoenix tuckeri x 2 Basselinia glabrata Basselinia humboldtiana Basselinia pancheri Basselinia velutina x 4 Bismarckia nobilis Burretiokentia dumasii Burretiokentia grandiflora x 2 Burretiokentia hapala x 3 Burretiokentia koghiensis x 3 Burretiokentia vieillardii x 2 Carpoxylon macrospermum Caryota mitis Caryota mitis variegated Chamaedorea adscendens x 5 Chamaedorea benziei Chamaedorea brachypoda Chamaedorea costaricana x 2 clumps Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti x 4 Chamaedorea klotzschiana Chamaedorea linearis Chamaedorea metallica x 7 Chamaedorea oblongata Chamaedorea radicalis x 5 Chamaedorea radicalis trunking x 6 Chamaedorea stolonifera x 1 clump Chamaedorea tepejilote x 6 Chamaedorea woodsoniana Chamaerops humilis 'cerifera' Chambeyronia macrocarpa Chambeyronia macrocarpa 'hookeri' x 3 Chambeyronia macrocarpa 'watermelon' x 5 Chambeyronia sp. 'Houailou' x 4 Chuniophoenix hainanensis x 2 Chuniophoenix nana Clinostigma savoryanum x 5 Coccothrinax barbadensis Coccothrinax crinita Coccothrinax fragrans Cryosophila stauracantha Cyphophoenix alba Cyphophoenix elegans x 4 Cyphophoenix nucele x 2 Cyphosperma balansae x 3 Dictyosperma album Dictyosperma conjugatum Dypsis albofarinosa x 2 Dypsis ambositrae x 4 Dypsis ampasindavae x 3 Dypsis arenarum Dypsis baronii Dypsis baronii 'black stem' Dypsis basilonga Dypsis carlsmithii x 2 Dypsis concinna x 2 Dypsis decipiens x 3 Dypsis forficifolia x 2 Dypsis heteromorpha Dypsis ifanadianae Dypsis lanceolata x 3 Dypsis leptocheilos. x 4 Dypsis lutescens Dypsis mananjarensis x 2 Dypsis marojejyi Dypsis onilahensis upright x 2 Dypsis onilahensis weeping x 3 Dypsis ovobontsira x 2 Dypsis pembana x 2 Dypsis pilulifera Dypsis plumosa x 3 Dypsis prestoniana Dypsis saintelucei x 2 Dypsis sp. 'Ambanja' x 3 Dypsis sp. 'bef' x 2 Dypsis sp. 'Bejoufa' x 2 Dypsis sp. 'betefaka' Dypsis sp. 'dark mealy bug' Dypsis sp. 'Lamana's baroni' Dypsis sp. 'Mahajanga' Dypsis sp. 'Mayotte' Dypsis sp. 'Orange Crush' Dypsis 'tri-bear' x 2 Euterpe edulis 'orange crown shaft' Hedyscepe canterburyana x 5 Howea belmoreana Howea forsteriana Kentiopsis magnifica x 3 Kentiopsis oliviformis x 3 Kentiopsis piersoniorum x 4 Kentiopsis pyriformis x 3 Kerriodoxa elegans Lanonia dasyantha x 4 Lepidorrhachis mooreana Licuala fordiana x 3 Licuala peltata var. 'sumawongii' Licuala ramsayi x 2 Licuala spinosa Pinanga coronata Pinanga philippinensis Pritchardia minor Ptychosperma elegans x 2 Ptychosperma lineare Ptychosperma schefferi Ptychosperma waitianum Ravenea glauca x 3 Ravenea julietiae Ravenea sambiranensis Ravenea xerophila Rhapis excelsa Rhapis humilis Rhapis multifida Rhopalostylis baueri 'cheesmanii' x 8 Rhopalostylis sapida 'chatham island'
  43. 10 points
    Joe, skip the count inventory and come to the confessional on the species you have represented. My garden is a mix of Palms, Aloes, Aloidendron, Cycads and a few trees, so the Palm count isn't that high and neither the home I live in nor my previous garden which is now a rental are that big of properties (about 1/4 acre each). I was looking at the species diversity between the two, and the newer planted garden here in Leucadia is more diverse on Palms, Cycads, Aloes and Aloidendron than my older garden. I will skip pots in plants which may or may not stay and just list species that are in the ground in the respective properties. Carlsbad garden palm species : Bismarckia nobilis Archontophoenix cunninghamiana Beccariophoenix fenestralis Burretiokentia hapala Caryota gigas Chamaedorea no id Chambeyronia macrocarpa Chambeyronia macrocarpa "hookeri" Chamerops humilis Clinostigma savoryanum Dypsis decaryi Dypsis lutescens Dypsis pembana Foxy Lady Wodyetia bifurcata x Vetichia Howea belmoreana Howea forsteriana Hyophorbe indica Hyophorbe lagenicaulis Kentiopsis oliviformis Phoenix reclinata Phoenix roebelenii Pritchardia hillebrandii Pritchardia maideniana Pritchardia no id Psuedophoenix sargentii Ravenea glauca Rhopalostylis baueri Rhopalostylis sapida Sabal mauritiformis Veitchia spiralis Wodyetia bifurcata Leucadia inventory of palm species or variants: Adonida merillii hybrid Allagoptera caudescens Archontophoenix cunninghamiana Arenga engleri Burretiokentia hapala Burretiokentia kogihensis Caryota urens Chamaedorea adscendens Chamaedorea ernest-augustii Chamaedorea geonomformis Chamaedorea metallica Chamaedorea neurochlamys Chaemaedorea oblongata Chambeyronia houailou Chambeyronia macrocarpa "hookeri" Chamaedorea hooperiana Clinostigma savoryanum Cocothrinax argentata Cocothrinax borhidiana hybrid Cocothrinax crinita Cocothrinax miraguama "azul" Copernicia baileyana x hospita aka "x Textilis" Cyphophoenix elegans Cyphophoenix nucele Cyphosperma balansae Dypsis "lanceonada" maybe "mayotte" Dypsis ambositrae Dypsis basilonga Dypsis bef Dypsis cabadae Dypsis crinita Dypsis decaryi Dypsis decipiens (2 trunk) Dypsis decipiens (4 trunk) Dypsis heteromorpha Dypsis honkona hybrid Dypsis lanceolata "normal trunk width" Dypsis lanceolata "narrow trunk width" Dypsis leptocheilos Dypsis onilahensis weepy form Dypsis lutescens Dypsis madagascariensis 'Mahajanga' Dypsis malcomberi hybrid Dypsis onilahensis hybrid Dypsis ovobontsiar Dypsis pembana (solitary) Dypsis pembana (clumping) Dypsis pilulifera Dypsis plumosa Dypsis prestoniana "Big Curly" Dypsis prestoniana Dypsis prestoniana "Jurrasic Park" Dypsis psammophilia Dypsis red stem no id solitariy Dypsis red stem no id clumping Dypsis robusta Dypsis santelucei Foxy Lady Wodyetia bifurcata x Vetichia Gausia princeps Howea belmoreana Kentiopsis oliviformis Licuala peltata var sumawongii Pritchardia bakeri Pritchardia beccariana Pritchardia flynnii Pritchardia maideniana Pritchardia no id bought as martii Pritchardia no id (kaalae?) Psuedophoenix sargentii ssp saonae var navassana Ravenea glauca Ravenea julietiae Rhopalostylis baueri v cheesemanii Thrinax radiata Veitchia spiralis
  44. 10 points
    Just an update. It's in the ground. I buried 25' of soaker hose in the mulch and have a timer set to soak for an hour every day at first. That should be 25 gallons each time. It has 12' of trunk, a little over half of that is clear. Root ball was 36" and I saw (what looked like) new roots when they removed the plastic wrap.
  45. 10 points
    Sunset a couple of nights ago. Fading light and a basic Samsung smart phone. i thought the palms looked OK with the low light conditions.
  46. 10 points
    This is the only one I have and it was planted is solid lava but it has done well and is starting to not burn
  47. 10 points
    6. acc# 120048, planted April 2012
  48. 10 points
    Bjxb getting huge Another angle JxB looks great BJxJ getting stronger
  49. 10 points
    No, lol not the kind of dates one might find at a bar.. though perhaps a sort of analogy As mentioned while adding pictures of Saguaro observed there earlieer, spent a cooler than average morning yesterday exploring a canyon near Boyce Thompson, which wraps around the north face of Picketpost Mountain out in the mountains east of the Valley. Had been on the " target list " when out in the same area this past Monday but cut this leg of that trip short. Yesterday was potentially the last opportunity to head out there until Fall, when i'll likely not be here. Anyway, Surveying Google maps of the Canyon awhile back, noted a few Date palms growing in the canyon about half way between the Picketpost access trailhead to the west, and where public access of Arnett Canyon is limited further to the east. Part of the planned visit last week was to try and find / photograph those potential specimens. While i didn't quite make it to those visible on Google Maps ( turned back less than .05 of a mile short of where those specimens were located ) did find several others nearby ..and had my second " meeting " with a very dangerous native reptile. Unlike last time i encountered what i believe is the same species of Rattlesnake, this time was a bit more dangerous since i was on a slope, ..Slope was still shaded, and the beast in question was well camouflaged in the grass/ other brush. I'm usually pretty good at spotting snakes when out but not yesterday.. Wouldn't have noticed it while taking pictures if i hadn't heard the distinct sound of a rattle, not too far from where i was standing.. Had i stepped 6 or so feet to my right, i'd have stepped on the snake, let alone been in much bigger trouble. Luckily, i didn't and the snake itself stayed extremely calm while i snapped some pictures just outside of what is considered the strike zone for large Rattlers. While tempting when encountered, being within this " zone " is something that comes with lots of experience w/ snakes in general and isn't something i recommend to anyone not already well versed in studying them to attempt.. Especially since the species encountered yesterday is the most venomous species in the U.S. -And no, this wasn't a Diamondback, though the 2 sp. are hard to tell apart w/ out careful study. Anyway.... Phoenix sp.. Thinking P dactylifera, but could be Canaries.. group on the north side of Arnett Canyon. Can see in the pictures that there are a few different specimens. Were not noticed on Google Maps. Specimen(s) noted are a little further up stream, on the south side of the creek / canyon, and at least in picture, appear larger / more mature. While just a guess, thinking birds moved seed here from specimens at Boyce Thompson, which is just on the other side of the hill. That or the larger specimen(s) a little further upstream might be reproducing ~if~ both sexes are present.. Whom i meet with yesterday: Crotulus scutulatus, aka the Mojave or " Green " Rattlesnake.. While Western Diamondbacks get all the attention, this is a far more dangerous snake to encounter. As mentioned sometime ago when i encountered what i believe is the same species, Mojave Rattlers are distinct in that different populations produce 2 different types of Venom ( Literally named " Mojave Toxin " ) and while most authorities consider specimens seen in AZ to produce " typical " Rattlesnake venom ( Type B ), there have been snakes encountered here that produced both and if bit by a specimen containing the more dangerous Neurotoxic variant ( Type A ), symptoms can take hours to set in. As far as telling this species from our native Diamondbacks, Head on a Mojave can have a dark, triangular area between the eyes, and darker eyebrow-like eyelids.. Contrasting bands on the tail, below the rattle look different, ..as well as the white bands below the eyes/ side of the face. That said, individuals can be quite variable, so no one way to id a species is always 100% correct.. Regardless, if you see one, give it space, & let it pass.. No need to have an exaggerated and overblown fear of them doing what snakes do out in the wild.. And remember, snakes only strike in defense.. They don't intentionally seek out conflict. While it did assume some degree of a striking pose when first noticed, it quickly settled down and sat in place, rattling a little occasionally -when i'd get a little too close for it's comfort-, ..but that was it.. Much respect and no malice for such an animal. In any event, perhaps a reminder i need to invest in a pair of snake -proof leg guards for future adventures into snake country.. Lots of wild things out there.
  50. 10 points
    Tall, straight as an arrow, with cool leaflets. Tim
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