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  1. Hilo Jason

    Hilo Jason

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  2. NOT A TA

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  3. palmsOrl

    palmsOrl

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    GottmitAlex

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/26/2019 in all areas

  1. 13 points
    Feeling the effects here of a massive storm (933hPA) way down in the Southern Ocean at the moment even though its 2000km away.. So it was a good day for a walk in the local rainforest which provides shelter and the rain almost enhances the ambiance of. Plus you get it all to one's self as few think of going out there in bad weather. The R. Sapida in this valley look more like Kentia due to the environment they are growing in, it's a nice part of the park for viewing them as the bush is not too thick.
  2. 13 points
    Being a landscape architect, overall design is a paramount but I’m also a palm collector so the challenge is keeping a nice overall design while having most of the palm species I really desire. I’m at 140 species and over 300 palms in the ground. With the garden maturing, there really is no more space for more palms, I’m in a Mediterranean climate zone 10a here in CA so technically I could be growing 100 more species.
  3. 12 points
    Tim Brian (realarch) and Bob Gibbens hosted a home garden tour for the Hawaii Island Palm Society, attracting the maximum capacity of 65 eager visitors. Regular readers of Palm Talk will recognize Tim and Bob’s elegant specimens and the attention to detail. The photos barely scratch the surface of all the beauty, but here goes... Edit: adding captions above each photo. First one, here I'm standing near the top of the driveway. The properties are on a fairly steep slope with great soil at the bottom and challenging pahoehoe lava at the top of the garden. Tall palms in the right of the frame are Euterpe precatoria. Below, the visitors enter the upper part of the makai garden under Bentinckia condapanna grove. There are many Dypsis downhill from this point. Mauna side of drive is Areca catechu 'alba' with the lemon-yellow crownshaft, a most outstanding palm due to the unusual color. Below, Tim's Tahina spectabilis from seed collected from the first known flowering and discovery of this species in Madagascar in 2011. Tree fern from Lord Howe Island (I think that's what Tim said...) and Iriartea deltoidea .
  4. 11 points
    I thought it would be interesting to start a thread dedicated to Dypsis. Feel free to post pictures and discuss any of the Dypsis mysteries, hybrids or stunning species that you have. I’ll kick off this first post with a hybrid mystery from my own garden. The below palm grew from a batch of Dypsis Robusta seed at Floribunda palms here on the Big Island. Suchin set this palm aside and was kind enough to let me buy it on one of my visits. It was busting out of a 15 gallon pot at the time. It has since responded very well to being in the ground. opposite side: close up: wider shot of planter: On a recent trip back to Floribunda I showed these pictures to Suchin and we explored around the Dypsis Robusta to see what it could have hybridized with. While there are many possibilities since Floribunda is a Dypsis wonderland, we believe that it most likely crossed with Dypsis Lanceolata which is very close to the Robusta parent tree. That would explain the smaller stature of the palm as well as some of the other traits this palm shows. ——————— Please post some of your favorite Dypsis photos. Doesn’t need to be a hybrid or a mystery, just a Dypsis. Looking forward to seeing some posts from other gardens around the world.
  5. 11 points
    Hello there, while waiting for the start of my son's baseball game I had a few minutes for myself that I used to give the surrounding area a closer look. I knew that there is a sacred place for the local gods, called 'utaki' but I had never paid it a visit before. A sticking out L. Chinensis was all I needed to get hooked. Reaching the end of the steps I stopped for a moment and remained silent to show my respect - then I took a deep breath and worked my way around the sacred place deeper into the wood. From here it started to get interesting, L. Chinensis all over the place, young and old ones. Beautiful. The trunk of this one looks really old. Moving forward very slowly and then I felt like in an Indiana Jones movie... Taking another step through the boscage my eyes got wide - a path! Looking to the right... ...and to the left. Yes , definitely a path but on it's way to get overgrown. Give it five more years and it won't be recognizable anymore... However, I took some more photos... ...before finally finding the path's entrance. It was a very short 'expedition' but definitely an interesting one. After making a mental note to pay this place another visit, ... ...it was time to move back to the playing field. Thank you for your time - best regards from Okinawa Lars
  6. 11 points
    This area experienced 8F in January of 1985!
  7. 11 points
    My Archy has decided to flower!
  8. 10 points
    Below, the unbelievable Mauritia flexuosa from the wettest areas of the Amazon. Cannot be overwatered. In Tim and Bob's Amazing Garden, they say this grows like something out of the Little Shop of Horrors. It's big. Humongous. Potential height is 35 meters, or 114 ft. Just another irresistible garden path... (the Lemurophoenix is the big frond buried behind the multi-trunked specimen in the right 1/3 of the photo. Tim in his element The small spirit house is a sweet souvenir from a palm trip to Thailand. Hilo Jason with host Tim Brian
  9. 10 points
    Tim and Bob moved from California to Hawaii’s Big Island in 2009 and soon commenced planting on two contiguous 1/2-acre parcels with a shared driveway. Below 2 photos: Metroxylon amicarum. Below left, Pinanga insignis; right, Neoveitchia storckii. Below, small palm in foreground: Areca catechu 'dwarf'
  10. 10 points
    Hello all! It's been a while since I've posted here, so I figured I'd post some updated pictures of palms growing around Wichita...all of these survived the below zero dips in 2014 (-7F) and early 2018 (-2F). Some of these are planted at a church downtown, some at various businesses, and some residential plantings. None of these were planted by me, but based on my experience growing palms in Kansas, we have two very important factors that are helping these survive. 1. Long, hot, usually wet summers and 2. While our winters can get very cold, below zero temperatures are relatively rare and they don't stick around. I have seen morning lows around zero and afternoon highs in the 50's or 60's a day later...that is always nice! Needles: Office building downtown Office building downtown University extension office, northwest side of town Church downtown Church downtown, myself for scale Residential planting I stumbled upon last week
  11. 10 points
    Well, I figure it's about time for an update. I continue to have the best luck with Sabals here: S. causarium, almost 6' to the top of the tallest leaf Then there's S. uresana, which is also doing well. I planted 3 of these and still have 2. And here's a waggie, which is doing OK but could use more water and shade: Cycas panzihuaensis is still my favorite cycad here: That about covers the weeded areas of my yard. Here's a BxJxS planted out this spring: Now I thought I had some liner-sized palms around here somewhere: Maybe I should look under the weeds? Yeah, that's better. Of course, I'm losing the war on weeds on other fronts too. I planted out a W. filifera and Macrozamia communis this spring: And here's something non-palmy: Quercus insignis. This poor tree can barely hang on through the zone 8 winters. I get two flushes of growth each year, but the second flush is not hardened off enough to survive the winter, and I generally I lose the buds on older growth too. I guess it's not dead yet, but long term prognosis here is questionable. It would be much happier under canopy, I think, but I don't have any.
  12. 10 points
    Sabals: Grove of Sabal louisiana at church downtown, only one was planted, the rest volunteered! Picture taken July 3 Sabal palmetto, church downtown Sabal minor Cape Hatteras, church downtown
  13. 9 points
    I just realized I failed to photograph the stunning Lemurophoenix, not very nice of me after having persuaded Tim and Bob to join me and Bo on an 8-hour heaving boat to get to Masoala Peninsula where we then hiked shoeless through muddy fields and up a very steep, very long hill just to admire the grand-daddy of the known Lemurophoenix population... Hilo Jason? Got a pic? Below: stilt roots of Verschaffeltia splendida? (my best guess) Below, the crowd winding their way through the many narrow garden paths. "A feast for the eyes," said one, in passing. Licuala mattanensis var. 'mapu'
  14. 9 points
    My Lepidorrhachis mooreana from Darold is opening up it’s second frond since I got it over winter. It gets morning sun, but is shaded before noon for the rest of the day. Lots of water. Not as slow as I thought.
  15. 9 points
    I know people like before and afters. I was looking through pictures and tried to recreate some of the older ones. Before pictures were from April 25, 2018. After pictures taken today August 1, 2019 15 months of growth.
  16. 9 points
    A couple random shots. Thanks for looking!
  17. 9 points
    These are panorama of my Highland Garden I actually can’t find some palms in this jungle,
  18. 9 points
    Thanks Steve. I went by the high school today and took some pictures. I will upload them in different posts, but here is the Fatsia and Sabal minors that I planted in our school's memorial/remembrance site. The first picture is from almost exactly four years ago (July 2015) when I planted them: Here are the same plants today (27 July 2019): As you can see, what a difference four years makes! The minors have been producing seeds for a couple of years, and I noticed some seedlings nearby. I will post more pictures soon. Thank you for looking.
  19. 8 points
    Others: Trachycarpus fortunei downtown Trachycarpus fortunei downtown Chamaerops humilis "cerifera" downtown, growing under a roof overhang for protection from rain
  20. 8 points
  21. 8 points
    There really is no selling or moving these beasts, they are in my back yard and would need a crane and massive truck to move. I have over 100 royals and the frond drop is just to much.
  22. 8 points
    So last year I got some Franken Brahea seeds (among other seeds) courtesy of Dooms Dave. In March 2018 I used the baggie germination method and the Chamaedorea radicalis came right up. The others didn’t, not surprising, some things take longer to germinate. In May/June of 2018 we moved into a different house and I took the bags and bottom-heating pad and got them set up in the basement of the new place. Well, life takes hold of you and we’re living out of boxes for weeks while getting things set up while still trying to work, take care of kids etc. and my bags full of palm seeds did not get adequate attention. Even within the bags, the soil dried out and I didn’t notice until they were all bone dry....bone dry. I’ve ruined seeds before by letting them dry up so I knew I had blown it. I’m too busy to mess with it so I left them and turned off the bottom heat. Imagine my surprise when in July 2018 (that’s 16 months after placing them in the bag and probably nearly a year after they dried up) I see palm sprouts galore inside the bag, one even pierced the bag, the rest were bent over at the top of the sealed bag! I can’t believe it, I’m lucky I noticed them, they could have died from lack of light, let alone water. They are all now safely potted up. Needless to say, after the miracle I quickly went and re-hydrated the remaining bags of seeds, who knows. Might get lucky again.
  23. 8 points
    Livistona muelleri is a great palm, not too large so perfect for the home harden, and very attractive with its stiff leaves...
  24. 7 points
    Thought you guys would enjoy this video on a coconut farm in Thailand
  25. 7 points
    I made a bit of a gamble when I planted it about 6 months ago. I figured it's problem was more of a dry heat than a 'damp" heat. My dry heat is usually in the spring and fall, we often get monsoonal heat in summer. Where it sits it gets over head sun from about 10-1 for two months in the summer. The rest of the year is shaded... another month and will be shaded again.. we shall see. And YES, kudos to Darold for growing and parting with such beautiful palms! Oh yes, 6' tall fence for scale



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