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  2. Hillizard

    Another Chamaerops humilis Vulcano

    Thanks for showing us what to expect from this C. humilis variety as a juvenile. My 6 'Vulcano' sprouts (from RPS seed) are entering their second year, so it's still too early to see those characteristic traits yet (I think you mentioned that in a previous post). I was surprised to see some spotting on their leaves during our recent NorCal cold weather. I guess as seedlings even this hardy species can be tender under certain conditions!
  3. kinzyjr

    Jubaea Decline

    At a minimum, I would try cleaning all the debris out of the crown and pouring a dose of peroxide in the crown. If it fizzes up, then you likely have microbe issues of some kind as you and others have suggested. If you do, a good dose of fungicide wouldn't hurt either.
  4. @NOT A TA Sorry for your loss. I'm having trouble removing one of mine that went into decline after being exposed to pool water. I'll have to remove it this week though since the replacement is coming.
  5. Podocarpus seems to recover a little slower from a hack job. I topped a few that turned out to be my neighbors a few years ago. They eventually got back to their 12-15 ft. of overall height, but it took some time for that to happen - more than a year. I'd have to say Viburnum recovers much more quickly. I haven't trimmed up the podocarpus yet because I want them to keep pace with the height of the bud of the coconut palms they protect. They are one of the windbreaks being used in the case of a more advective freeze event. I'll eventually have to bush them out, but for now I'm letting them grow unimpeded to ensure I get the coconuts through the juvenile stage.
  6. Mine only spent a short time in a pot and then went into the ground. While it was small it was almost constantly in flower. In the ground and as it grew taller the flowering was irregular. A lot of rain after a dry period seems to trigger flowering but I've never paid any particular attention to it. There could be other factors. Don't know about growing from cuttings, any information I got insisted marcotting was the only way. Cuttings were never mentioned, neither positively nor negatively. Always worth a try though but use one of those commonly available rooting hormones rather than just putting it in water.
  7. Back around 2010 I germinated seeds of this dwarf Chamaerops from an island in the Mediterranean Sea. They were generously sent to me by a palm lover in Rome. I kept and planted about half a dozen seedlings that appeared to show Vulcano traits, which show up across a range. A couple years ago I posted photos of my primo palm on the north side of my garden lot. These photos are of one of its siblings, which shows almost as well. Chamaerops humilis 'Vulcano', Cape Coral, FL
  8. About a dozen years ago I found a seedling of this Syagrus. I planted it on the south edge of our Garden Lot. It has grown much more slowly than my queen palms in the back yard and has turned into a handsome and compact palm. Also, it has not been infected with the fusiarum wilt that destroyed our queens, mules and Washy in 2014/15. This species deserves to be planted much more often. Anyone else grow it? Syagrus picrophylla, Cape Coral, FL
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  10. Because I have adobe clay soil that is "seasonally soggy," I built up a 3+ ft-high berm on part of my property and planted a dozen palms on it. That helps the drainage issue during our wet NorCal winters. Perhaps this might be an option for you? While my palms are still small, this planting looks great. I'll worry about overcrowding in another ten years!
  11. RJ

    Jubaea Decline

    You may want to try posting over on EPS. Lots of folks are growing Jubaea over there in cooler climates. They might be able to offer a more definitive suggestions
  12. Below is a photo of one of my Chipola dwarfs taken today. It it going palmate.
  13. I just noticed this in San Mateo, as I was bicycling to work today. Is this C. cataractarum or Ravenea rivularis?
  14. RyManUtah

    Removing oldeander

    They are beautiful. The thevetia is probably my favorite. I like how green they stay in the winter too. thats beautiful winter weather! I’m envious, although it’s been warm here also. We’ve stayed 9a this year so far (9b at my house). There’s a couple freezes forecasted this week, but nothing below 30 degrees. Daytime highs are soaring and I love it!
  15. akamu

    Roystonea violacea

    Anyone growing one of these in California that has some pictures. Or elsewhere with a similar climate?
  16. Fusca

    Removing oldeander

    That's great - oleanders are probably my favorite shrub. I have a white one and a red one I use as a screen in my backyard. I also planted a Mexican oleander (Cascabela thevetia) with peach-colored flowers. It's done very well in our heat and drought with minimal irrigation - I really like the glossy leaves on them. I understand the spring fever - we haven't gone below freezing yet this new year and not forecasted to freeze through the end of the month. It will be the first January without a freeze in San Antonio since 1939! I prefer these types of winter weather records! February hopefully won't be a different story...
  17. Wow. I had no idea there were this many species. Awesome thanks. When you say seasonally soggy soils, is that going to be a different growing conditions than water constantly 1 foot below the surface due being low lying marsh lands surrounded by bay water. Keep in mind it 1 foot below surface about halfway up my yard. I only have about 7 inches before I hit water on my back yard back end fence line. Id really love to put something here other than just a Sabal Palmetto, but I figure its not possible. Would the Trachycarpus be okay on my back fence line.?
  18. buffy

    Jubaea Decline

    Not yet.
  19. RyManUtah

    Removing oldeander

    I’m really excited. Spring fever has hit in really badly ha. I did. A couple went to neighbors, and the rest are being planted at an entrance to a newer housing development. I think they will look nice there. Wide “median” planter so they’ll have room to flourish when they grow back out.
  20. Fusca

    Removing oldeander

    Good to hear! They should grow faster in the ground! The palms are better but I like oleanders also - hope you found good homes for them.
  21. I'm in a 9A zone (in a good year!) and growing successfully Trachycarpus latisectus, T. princeps, T. sp. 'Nova' and T. fortunei var. wagernianus in seasonally soggy soils. Here's a species overview: http://palmvrienden.net/gblapalmeraie/2017/06/30/trachycarpus-species-a-complete-overview/
  22. anyca

    Struggling Kentia Palm

    Hello everyone! Fairly new to taking care of a bigger palm, we have had our Kentia since summer last year. I'm turning to you all as I have no clue what's wrong with it even after hours of googling. It started with leaf tips and now it is whole fronds going. Initially we thought it was from overfeeding, but we have been washing it through for months and it keeps getting worse. Any idea what's wrong with this green baby and what we could do to save it?
  23. RyManUtah

    Removing oldeander

    Thank you. Sure is! some massive roots on that one too
  24. Fusca

    Removing oldeander

    Looking good! Is that last one the Sabal mexicana?
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