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Looking for some Suggestions...

42 posts in this topic

I am looking to plant some hedges along my wall facing the street where I live. Currently, it is just weeds with some random ground cover here and there.

I am looking for something a little different than your standard SD tract home landscaping items. So, that means no dwarf schefflera, pittosporum, tecomaria, escalonia, bird of paradise, Pride of Madeira, etc....

In addition, I want to keep it somewhat low and pretty uniform to please the wife. I have enough hibiscus, so I don't want to do that either.

Really, I have no ideas and am looking for some.

It obviously would have to be something that does well here in the coastal areas of San Diego. I'd love to do a whole wall of crotons, but they are pretty marginal and I'd be hard pressed to get a 40 ft. hedge row out of it.

Anyone have any suggestions?

Oh....it's full sun the entire day and pretty warm south facing spot.

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How about Michelia?  It can be nicely trimmed as a brush.  It is evergreen in SoCal and the fragrant flowers on the alba produce most of the year.

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Pittosporum tenuifolia 'Silver Queen' and 'Silver Sheen' are stunning plants. Manageable and good looking.

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How about some of the alocasia's? I have one of the larger species - might be calodora, cant remember. THey form a trunk and pup. Mine fill in pretty qick and I have to chop pups off every year. I could easily turn them into a hedgerow. Maybe mix in some Ti's for color??

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(jenks @ Nov. 12 2007,18:22)

QUOTE
How about some of the alocasia's? I have one of the larger species - might be calodora, cant remember. THey form a trunk and pup. Mine fill in pretty qick and I have to chop pups off every year. I could easily turn them into a hedgerow. Maybe mix in some Ti's for color??

Yo John:

Not a bad idea.

Do they go dormant in the winter? I have some alocaisa (of course, it might be colocasia) that almost disappears in the winter and I have some that stick around and look fine.

Thanks

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Do you want it to be more drought resistant, or dependent on lots of irrigation?  Not uncommon in San Diego, but just as colorful as any Croton, would be a hedge of Euphorbia tirucallii 'Sticks on Fire'.  Larger growing, but also pretty drought tolerant and lots of foliage color; Euphorbia continiifolia.  A hedge of Grevillea 'Robyn Gordon' or G. 'Superb' could also give lots of color all year round.  Euphorbia lambii could be an elegant hedge which would look more like miniature trees, and so different from most other Euphorbias.  Grewia caffra would make a nice clipped hedge with virtual year round bloom, and a more green, manicured appearance than the others, especially if grown as a clipped espalier.  Or how about a hedge of Strelitzia juncea, underplanted with Senecio serpens as a ground cover.  Adenanthos sericea could also look great, especially if you like silvery foliage and red blooms.  Metrosideros collina 'Tahiti' could also give you silvery foliage and red blooms all year long.

None of these plants are particularly rare in San Diego, but perhaps are not as overplanted everywhere as the first ones you listed.  I would tend to stay away from the more water loving stuff for a hot wall, unless you don't mind an ever increasing water bill...

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None of mine go dormant - not the Alocasia's I have anyways.

Here is a pic of the one I am thinking of - Sold to me as Alocasia 'calidora' Pretty bulletproof here. Full sun and exposure to wind. Looking a little ratty here due to lack of watering for that month combined with some warm temps.

1991706996_b467a57e53.jpg

Alocasia macrorrhizos (that's what it was sold to me as) is pretty cool too - much smaller though. You can kinda see one of the trunks to the right of this foxtail below and middle left in the pic above

1352870387_6439cbe34f.jpg

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(bahia @ Nov. 12 2007,19:12)

QUOTE
Do you want it to be more drought resistant, or dependent on lots of irrigation?  Not uncommon in San Diego, but just as colorful as any Croton, would be a hedge of Euphorbia tirucallii 'Sticks on Fire'.  Larger growing, but also pretty drought tolerant and lots of foliage color; Euphorbia continiifolia.  A hedge of Grevillea 'Robyn Gordon' or G. 'Superb' could also give lots of color all year round.  Euphorbia lambii could be an elegant hedge which would look more like miniature trees, and so different from most other Euphorbias.  Grewia caffra would make a nice clipped hedge with virtual year round bloom, and a more green, manicured appearance than the others, especially if grown as a clipped espalier.  Or how about a hedge of Strelitzia juncea, underplanted with Senecio serpens as a ground cover.  Adenanthos sericea could also look great, especially if you like silvery foliage and red blooms.  Metrosideros collina 'Tahiti' could also give you silvery foliage and red blooms all year long.

None of these plants are particularly rare in San Diego, but perhaps are not as overplanted everywhere as the first ones you listed.  I would tend to stay away from the more water loving stuff for a hot wall, unless you don't mind an ever increasing water bill...

I'm going to check into some of those. I'll probably pass on the s. juncea...I'm just not a big fan. Also, I have a street with a lot of small kids, so the euphorbia may not be a good idea. Thanks very much.

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(happ @ Nov. 12 2007,18:16)

QUOTE
How about Michelia?  It can be nicely trimmed as a brush.  It is evergreen in SoCal and the fragrant flowers on the alba produce most of the year.

Thanks, Happ. Those look awesome but I have a 20 ft michelia alba nearby so I'm looking for something a little different.

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(Gonzer @ Nov. 12 2007,18:19)

QUOTE
Pittosporum tenuifolia 'Silver Queen' and 'Silver Sheen' are stunning plants. Manageable and good looking.

Nice idea, I'll look into that though I see pittosporum all over the place. Maybe not that cultivar though. Thanks, mucho.

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Many choices already posted are pretty good. Here are a few I like:

Variegated Japanese Pittosporum (Pittosporum tobira) - Common, but great for highlighting purples and reds. I use to hate this plant but after spending time in a few tropical spots, I noticed it is used a lot at hotels. Took their idea and love it.

Another common one, but overlooked a lot is Escallonia 'Compakta'. This is the most used plant for me for hedging. It can be keep low and fits well in a tropical landscape.

Various Nandina's. Small would be Dwarf Nandina (Nandina domestica). Larger would be Nandina 'Plum Passion'. These do not make formal hedges, but can be planted in mass.

One that I just started trying that I do not see in SoCal but it tropical looking is Philippine Violet (Barleria cristata). It is dense and flowers spring through fall.

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If you decide to go with the Alocasia look, you might also want to consider Colocasia fontanesii.  It stays up year round, looks great in sun or shade, and spreads pretty quickly, but not quickly enough to be invasive.

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(Peter @ Nov. 12 2007,21:45)

QUOTE
If you decide to go with the Alocasia look, you might also want to consider Colocasia fontanesii.  It stays up year round, looks great in sun or shade, and spreads pretty quickly, but not quickly enough to be invasive.

Awesome. Thank-you.

Just where do I find these different varieties of alocasia?

Any idea?

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Here's a nutty thought. What about Scaevola Taccada?....beach naupaka.

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(epicure3 @ Nov. 12 2007,22:25)

QUOTE
Here's a nutty thought. What about Scaevola Taccada?....beach naupaka.

Don't know how that Scaevola will do out in CA.

How about Thevetia peruviana? Will thin out the stupid kids who eat it though...

Hamelia patens is common in FL but also does well in CA. Finding it there may be difficult though.

Jasminum nitidum (Angelwing Jasmine) can make a good, fragrant, low hedge with a little work.

If I can think of more, I'll post later.

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Jenks, I never thought alocasia would do so well in full sun  ???  how did they hold-up during summer 2006?  Was macrorrhizos sold as "New Guinea Gold"?

epicure

Scaevola taccada sounds great [had to look it up; have you seen it in Cali?

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Shrubby types:

Acacia merinthophora has zigzag branches and weeping habit

Banksias are worth trying for the flowers alone.

Lots of Coprosma cutilvars have shiny colorful leaves and are very tough.

Michelia yunnanensis is a sprawling shrub with fragrant spring flowers.

Grassy types:

Otatea acuminata is the Mexican Weeping Bamboo with beautiful form, also very drought tolerant.

Cannomois virgata, a giant restio from South Africa, will need some TLC but a row of these will impress your most jaded garden friend.

Setarea palmifolia needs a bit of shelter, but looks just like palm seedlings.

New Bambusas(B. eutuldoides Vridivittata & B. pervariabilis Viridistriata) have brightly variegated culms similar to Bambusa vulgaris Vittata, but are much smaller in size.

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I think Jeff White should have some, as well as Greg in Lake Forest.

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John...

how about a "wall" of Macrozamia communis?

or if you want to keep people out, make them M. moorei's.......

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Bambusa textilis var "Gracilis"

Trim/prune to suit.

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Another good fine-textured, fragrant shrub is Murraya paniculata, underused, IMO, as a hedge/screen.

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How about silver buttonwood?  Drought tolerant, salt tolerant, great silvery color, great forms, great bark for mounting orchids and bromeliads.

I also like bamboo muhly grass - Muehlynbergia bambusa.  It stays low - about 3 feet - mounds over and has a great look.  I like the grasses.  I think they are underused in landscapes.

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(palmmermaid @ Nov. 13 2007,07:23)

QUOTE
How about silver buttonwood?  Drought tolerant, salt tolerant, great silvery color, great forms, great bark for mounting orchids and bromeliads.

I also like bamboo muhly grass - Muehlynbergia bambusa.  It stays low - about 3 feet - mounds over and has a great look.  I like the grasses.  I think they are underused in landscapes.

Silver buttonwood won't take the cold, wet Winters of SoCal unfortunately. But a good, silvery substitute would be Leucophyllum frutescens (Texas Ranger). It's drought tolerant and comes in several flower colors.

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These are all awesome suggestions. And THANKS  :P for taking the time. Now, there's waaay too much stuff to choose from.

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John, how about Caeselpinia pulchurrima (sorry, wrong spelling)?  I think you could actually use a hedge trimmer on it to give a clean, formal look during non flowering times.  They don't need a lot of water and do good in sun.

post--1194980366_thumb.jpg

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(MattyB @ Nov. 13 2007,10:59)

QUOTE
John, how about Caeselpinia pulchurrima (sorry, wrong spelling)?  I think you could actually use a hedge trimmer on it to give a clean, formal look during non flowering times.  They don't need a lot of water and do good in sun.

Matt, Toni wanted me to tell you he thinks your idea stinks.

-------------

In all seriousness, they will drop leaves during cold snaps and they do not hedge well. Plus they like a lot of training to avoid being leggy. John, I have some seedlings of "Sunset" - red/yellow/orange, "Aurea" - yellow and "Rosea" - pink. I could part with a few for free if you wanted to try some. They need full sun and they are drought tolerant once established.

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Ficus benjamin is used extensively in South Florida as a hedge and I have seen numerous Benjamin's in pictures in California and Arizona. Would it not work in San Diego as a hedge?

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(bubba @ Nov. 13 2007,14:44)

QUOTE
Ficus benjamin is used extensively in South Florida as a hedge and I have seen numerous Benjamin's in pictures in California and Arizona. Would it not work in San Diego as a hedge?

This tree will get very big with invasive roots.  I'm sure the area between his wall and the sidewalk is not big enough for the roots.

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:)
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(MattyB @ Nov. 13 2007,13:59)

QUOTE
John, how about Caeselpinia pulchurrima (sorry, wrong spelling)?  I think you could actually use a hedge trimmer on it to give a clean, formal look during non flowering times.  They don't need a lot of water and do good in sun.

I love that plant but it is deciduous here along the coast and has been an unreliable bloomer for me to-boot. I do love that plant.......I saw one that was almost tree size down in Cabo last year. Nice.

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What about a smattering of different Cordyline australis colors.  They'll do great in sun and they've got a really nice one with red petioles now.   You can plant a 99 cent store size plant and in 1 year it'll be the size of the 2 gallons at home depot.

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(LJG @ Nov. 13 2007,14:20)

QUOTE

(MattyB @ Nov. 13 2007,10:59)

QUOTE
John, how about Caeselpinia pulchurrima (sorry, wrong spelling)?  I think you could actually use a hedge trimmer on it to give a clean, formal look during non flowering times.  They don't need a lot of water and do good in sun.

Matt, Toni wanted me to tell you he thinks your idea stinks.

-------------

In all seriousness, they will drop leaves during cold snaps and they do not hedge well. Plus they like a lot of training to avoid being leggy. John, I have some seedlings of "Sunset" - red/yellow/orange, "Aurea" - yellow and "Rosea" - pink. I could part with a few for free if you wanted to try some. They need full sun and they are drought tolerant once established.

Len...that's nice of you, thanks but you'd probably be wasting it on me as mentioned in my previous post....they are unreliable bloomers for me and go deciduous even in normal coastal situations (at least for me). Nice offer though!!

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(BigFrond @ Nov. 13 2007,15:11)

QUOTE

(bubba @ Nov. 13 2007,14:44)

QUOTE
Ficus benjamin is used extensively in South Florida as a hedge and I have seen numerous Benjamin's in pictures in California and Arizona. Would it not work in San Diego as a hedge?

This tree will get very big with invasive roots.  I'm sure the area between his wall and the sidewalk is not big enough for the roots.

That would be correct. They grow just fine here, but they want to be trees. The space is not big enough to accomodate the roots of the ficus. Too bad, b/c I love the look of a neatly kept ficus hedge.

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(happ @ Nov. 12 2007,23:31)

QUOTE
Jenks, I never thought alocasia would do so well in full sun  ???  how did they hold-up during summer 2006?  Was macrorrhizos sold as "New Guinea Gold"?

epicure

Scaevola taccada sounds great [had to look it up; have you seen it in Cali?

Happ, I haven't seen that variety of scaevola in SoCal. I saw it for the first time in the Bahamas this year. That's never stopped me before. :cool:

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Instead of a hedge, you can plant a vine that clings on your wall and saving some space for your for more planting.  There is a specific ficus vine (I forgot the name) with thick leaves that is sooooo nice.  It will take a couple of years for the leaves to get big.  There are no massive roots.  You can see this vine on Leucadia Ave on the big wall on the left after the golf course.

ficus pumila

http://images.google.com/imgres?....rl=http

http://vtgcrec.ifas.ufl.edu/pages....ila.JPG

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(daxin @ Nov. 12 2007,23:37)

QUOTE
Shrubby types:

Acacia merinthophora has zigzag branches and weeping habit

Banksias are worth trying for the flowers alone.

Lots of Coprosma cutilvars have shiny colorful leaves and are very tough.

Michelia yunnanensis is a sprawling shrub with fragrant spring flowers.

Grassy types:

Otatea acuminata is the Mexican Weeping Bamboo with beautiful form, also very drought tolerant.

Cannomois virgata, a giant restio from South Africa, will need some TLC but a row of these will impress your most jaded garden friend.

Setarea palmifolia needs a bit of shelter, but looks just like palm seedlings.

New Bambusas(B. eutuldoides Vridivittata & B. pervariabilis Viridistriata) have brightly variegated culms similar to Bambusa vulgaris Vittata, but are much smaller in size.

Hi Daxin:

Interesting options. I checked into the Coprosma and they are cool. Some of the coprosma repens cultivars are awesome looking. That may be the one!!

Thanks....never would have come up with that.

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DYPSIS BARONII!

No, not fast, but well worth the wait.

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Here's some from my roof, off to the right.

post-1-14207-ROOF_8_glaucas__baronii_and_rhapis.JPG

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And some more:

post-1-14342-ROOF_11_baronii.JPG

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Thanks, Dave. But, my wife Terri says that if I plant any more palms, she's going to drive to your house and jump off your roof. Since you're an attorney, you probably don't want that kind of liability.

Me? I would probably have a whole row of dypsis lutescens as my hedge.

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