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Favorite Cold Hardy Feather Palm

Favorite Cold Hardy Feather Palm   113 votes

  1. 1.

    • Acrocomia aculeata
      5
    • Arenga engleri
      6
    • Attalea cohune
      6
    • Butia capitata
      13
    • Butia capitata X Syagrus romanzoffiana
      16
    • Ceroxylon alpinum
      3
    • Dypsis decipiens
      30
    • Jubaea chilensis
      19
    • Phoenix canariensis
      7
    • Syagrus romanzoffiana
      8

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41 posts in this topic

With winter approaching in the northern hemisphere, I started to think about what I SHOULD have planted in my garden rather than all the Cocos, Veitchia and Wodyetia... I picked these because they are some of my favorites and they are supposed to be able to take freezes AND frost. Too bad some of those on the list will not grow here in Florida. What are your favorite cold hardy feather palms from the list above?

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I do not think Attalea cohune is cold hardy at all.

I had to go with Dypsis decipiens. Nothing like large, mature ones.

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oops,i didn't see d.decipiens at 1st glance & voted for something else :angry:

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Sorry everyone, I thought Attalea cohune was supposed to be good down to low to mid 20's F. At least there are still 9 appropriate choices.

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While all is subject to debate,.......

"Hardiness: USDA Zones 9 - 12. The cohune palm is believed to be the hardiest palm in the genus Attalea. Juvenile palms are uniquely protected from frosts, because the trunk remains underground for many years. Mature and established plants have been reported to tolerate temperatures down to 23ºF (-5 ºC), losing 10%-100% of their foliage but recovering during warmer months. Cohune palms have not recovered after being subjected to temperatures of 22 ºF (-5.6 ºC) for extended time periods. "

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Just had to vote for the only palm in the list I have growing. The wonderful Arenga engleri, go you good thing. Like to have the space for an Attalea though.

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This was a hard choice! I selected Dypsis decipiens, but hesitated because it is so slow. A second choice for me would be Syagrus romanzoffiana.

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ok, i am the only one that voted acrocomia so far!!

but whats not to love?

post-18-1190157114_thumb.jpg

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i mean it just screams hug me!!!!

post-18-1190157155_thumb.jpg

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The best palms from that list are all so slow. And some aren't even that coldhardy, like the Ceroxylon.

I'll go with Arenga engleri. Just shooting from the hip.

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Dypsis Decipiens...and it was a hard choice...Was going to go for the Ceroxylon alpinum and the Acrocomia, but decided that the new redish leaf combined with a suckering Spindle palm look-a-like wins!

Mike F

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I voted for D. decipiens, but if I thought the cohune was cold hardy (or cool hardy) enough to be grown here I would have gone for it.  My second and third choices are very low on votes, Ceroxylon and Jubaea, must be a lot of people's second and third choices.

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Ceroxylon and Attalea aren't that cold-hardy.  Ceroxies are cool-hardy, being from the high mountains and all.

All the rest I have, and I love them all, my lovely lovely children.

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butia x jubaea F2 hybrid, one that takes the cold and some desert heat.  From the list I'd take a mule palm, for here.

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I had to go with Dypsis decipiens.  Any Dypsis that even has half a chance in my climate would always get my vote and it's a great looking palm too.  Strangely, I have three Dypsis species in my collection and this is not one of them.

Arenga engleri is also great, if you have a spare field to grow it in.  The clumps I have seen just seem to get bigger and bigger.

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I would have picked D. decipiens, but since I've heard it doesn't grow well here, I picked the butia x syagrus romanzoffiana.

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My choice was Butia capitata.  I love this palm.  I see it in the old neighborhoods in Jacksonville as mature specimens.  They survived the freeze of 1989 - it was below freezing for several days.  I love the gray-blue leaves with their graceful drooping shape.  And the fruit is edible.

While I was in Jacksonville last winter I saw many frozen queen palms so I am not sure it is cold-hardy.  Also saw many frozen Phoenix roebelinii.  But no frozen Butias.  All very healthy.

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Of the lot Dypsis decipiens but I cant grow these in Jax.

They sudddenly rot. A well grown mule or Acrocomia is hard to beat.

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Hello everybody,i did vote it did have my favouriate phoenix in the list.... :D

here is the one that is growing in south india...

post-108-1190217710_thumb.jpg

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(palmmermaid @ Sep. 19 2007,09:43)

QUOTE
My choice was Butia capitata.  I love this palm.  I see it in the old neighborhoods in Jacksonville as mature specimens.  They survived the freeze of 1989 - it was below freezing for several days.  I love the gray-blue leaves with their graceful drooping shape.  And the fruit is edible.

While I was in Jacksonville last winter I saw many frozen queen palms so I am not sure it is cold-hardy.  Also saw many frozen Phoenix roebelinii.  But no frozen Butias.  All very healthy.

Just how cold did Jax get last winter??

The queens around here were toasted a little bit from low/mid 20s last winter but recovered nicely.

For me, it is a more matter of what is hardy, so I can't vote for the less hardy ones.  Based on hardiness around here, my choices are

Phoenix Canariensis

Butia Capitata

Mule Palm

Syagrus R.

Boring, I know, but that list is about as far as I can go in zone 9a, and borderline 9a at that. (The syagrus actually may not be 100% hardy, but hardy enough worth growing, the others are hardy here).  Currently I have Canariensis, Butia and Syagrus in ground and all are doing great.

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I don't know how cold it got last year in Jax.  I know it was below freezing the time I was there and I remember seeing many P. roebellinii and Syagrus r. brown and wilted looking.  This was in my daughter's neighborhood.  She lives in the Whitehouse area which is at least 25 miles from the coast and not near any water.

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Hey all, are there any other cold and frost hardy feather palms that I did not include? I know that most of the Phoenix and Butia genuses are pretty tough. I thought the Ceroxylon genus was supposed to be able to take freeze and frost. Or maybe they just like a constantly cool mostly frost and freeze free location like San Francisco? I think that Jubaeopsis and Parajubaea are in the same category. Also, I am still wondering if D. decipiens can really take a frost even though they stand up pretty good to freezes. I haven't met a crownshafted palm yet that can actually take foliar frost with little to no damage. Also, I think that Attalea cohune may be one of those palms that can take one shot of freeze or frost a winter and live to make a full recovery. They probably croak during prolonged cool - maybe  better for the gulf coast sub tropics that see only one definite freeze or foliar frost each winter but are pretty toasty most of the rest of the time.

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The double Ds are the best.

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(ruskinPalms @ Sep. 19 2007,17:45)

QUOTE
Hey all, are there any other cold and frost hardy feather palms that I did not include?

Maybe someone else has mentioned it, but what about Chamaedorea radicalis?  The tree-forming one is especially nice, and I believe it takes down to 20F.

Probably a couple of other Chamaedoreas as well.

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dear importer, whole saler and nursery man

all seedling is ready for sale, intetested person contect me

regards

saifullah

saifbrothers@gmail.com

saifullah_arslan@hotmail.co

1- Archontophoenix alexandrae

2- Areca triandra

3- Bismarckia silver nobilis

4- Butia capitata

5- Caryota mitis

6- Caryota urens

7- Chamaedorea seifrizii

8- Chamaedorea elegans

9- Chamaerops humilis

10- Chamerops humilis silver

11- Cycas revoluta

12- cycas thouarsii

13- Cyrtostachys renda

14- Dioon spinulosum

15- Dypsis decary

16- Dioon edule

16- Dypsis leptocheilos

17- Hyophorbe lagenicaulis

18- Hyophorbe verschaffeltii

19- latania verschafeltii

20- Latina lodigesii

21- Phoenix canariensis

22- Phoenix roebelenii

23- Phoenix rupicola

24- Ravenea rivularis

25- Ravenala madagascariensis

26- Rhapis excelsa

27- Rhapis humilis

28- Syagrus romanzoffiana

29- Wodyetia bifurcata

30- Zamia furfuracea

__

importer and exporter of palm seeds, cycas seeds and ornamental plant seeds and seedling

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If Parajubaea torallyi or sunka had been on the list, I would have chosen that as my prefered cold hardy feather palm. I actually chose S. romanzoffiana mainly for its ability to recover so fast if it does suffer at all from a freeze. I love my Dypsis d. but it's soooo slow as are my Arenga and Ceroxylon. My Parajubaeas are growing pretty darned fast though!

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Having seen the Dypsis decipiens at Pauleen Sullivan's in Ventura changed everything Ive ever thought about palm trees that can handle below 20F.

Slow yes, but along with Parajubaea torallyi, I beleive these are the number one and two palms for California.

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Must get double D's, Must get double D's  :P  :o

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I didnt know the Attalea cohune was cold hardy. How low can it go?

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I had to go with d. decipiens ... ( as I have one thats getting ready to trunk ) but its hard to call them a " Feather palm " as the fronds are NOT soft like a feather... They are the most stiff /rigid palm frond I have ever seen.

In my garden.. My Ceroxylon Apinium was just as hard hardy... not getting any frost damage this past winter ...it got down to 23f.

Parajubea cocoides was a close runner up.

Jeff

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Blue Jubaea makes the boldest Statement and longest live with little coconuts and it prunes itself. A palm that will be enjoyed for many generations to come. Cold hardy, low maintenance and drought tolerant. I vote Jubae #1

Planted in 1878

http://i207.photobucket.com/albums....se2.jpg

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Arenga engleri.  Supposedly quite tough, not much planted

Butia capitata.  Hardy to Charleston, S.C.  Unfazed by the great 1989 freeze and ice storm in Jacksonville, Fla.

Ceroxylon alpinum.  Apparently doesn't like sea-level weather.

Jubaea chilensis.  Doesn't like humidity--so not in Fla.

Phoenix canariensis.  Jacksonville has some very old, very spectacular ones.  P. sylvestris has become popular recently--it would be worth watching its performance.

Syagrus romanzoffiana.  I think Dave Witt made the right point--healthy plants are hardier than badly nourished or maltreated ones.  Florida has an extraordinary portion of them suffering nutrient deficiencies.  Plus, there's the lethal new fusarium disease.

Dave Witt has extraordinarily good Freeze tolerance info for Florida.

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How can Dypsis decipiens be voted favourite as a cold hardy palm, its not cold hardy at all.

Cool tolerant yes, cold hardy no. It wont last 5 minutes here.

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trachycarpus

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(Nigel @ Oct. 06 2007,11:16)

QUOTE
How can Dypsis decipiens be voted favourite as a cold hardy palm, its not cold hardy at all.

Cool tolerant yes, cold hardy no. It wont last 5 minutes here.

Nigel... Oh yes it is hardy... probably a couple of degrees more cold hardy than Washingtonia and queen palms.

Mine survived this past winters 23f out in the open without damage. I saw queen plams toasted.

Jeff

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(Nigel @ Oct. 06 2007,11:16)

QUOTE
How can Dypsis decipiens be voted favourite as a cold hardy palm, its not cold hardy at all.

Cool tolerant yes, cold hardy no. It wont last 5 minutes here.

It is certainly not tolerant of a wet, humid climate.  Won't grow in Florida.  Here in the drier parts of California it has survived below 20F.

Strange for a palm from Madagascar.  I was skeptical myself.

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(ghar41 @ Oct. 06 2007,18:10)

QUOTE

(Nigel @ Oct. 06 2007,11:16)

QUOTE
How can Dypsis decipiens be voted favourite as a cold hardy palm, its not cold hardy at all.

Cool tolerant yes, cold hardy no. It wont last 5 minutes here.

It is certainly not tolerant of a wet, humid climate.  Won't grow in Florida.  Here in the drier parts of California it has survived below 20F.

Strange for a palm from Madagascar.  I was skeptical myself.

I think 18F is close to the kill zone for juvenile D. decipiens.  I saw a couple dozen at Phil Nickel's nursery near Bakersfield, CA about a week ago.  He has two in ground about five feet apart.  One under canopy looked good and one fully exposed was struggling to survive.  The funny thing was, when I saw these two as the freeze was coming to an end, the one under canopy looked bad and the fully exposed one looked much better.  I think Phil reported four days with lows of 18F (more details were in one of the freeze reports threads).  He also had a couple dozen in 2-5G pots and reported most completely defoliated, some died, but most looked untouched in late Sept (I bought two to add to my decipiens collection as these two definitely have good genes).  Another nursery in Fresno had a dozen or so in 15g.  They had no apparent damage immediately after the freeze (under a large tree) and all but one or two looked healthy last week.  The owner reported 18F with extended freeze periods.

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attaleas have recovered from the upper teens in south texas. Of course their growing points were below ground, it takes them many decades to form a trunk in a nontropical climate

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What is the climate like in Madagascar where D. decipiens comes from? I would expect Madagascar to be fairly humid. I think I remember some one saying that D. d. comes from a high plateau. Is the weather summer drought with winter rain like in med climates or is more a wet/dry tropics/subtropics setup? D. decipiens may be a challenge in FL, but one I would like to take. Much like the challenge of growing a coconut in california: difficult but obviously not impossible.

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My vote was for the mule palm but

Parajubaeas should be in the list..

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