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ruskinPalms

Make your own zone map!

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Alan_Tampa

Nothing in that area except all the coolest bestest stuff ever.  Some big lychee trees there as well.

I refer to  Tampa's mini-wang area.

Alan

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Eric in Orlando

I noticed lots of tropicals 9banyans, royal poincianas, etc. as you got closer to the base but just none on it. I figured since the base is on the tip of that peninsula that it has a very nice microclimate, just didn't see it being taken advantage of. I guess the Air Force has better things to do than plant coconuts! That drive along Bayshore is really nice.

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tropical1

ruskinpalms

Great zone map overall. I think there is a definite lake effect microclimate though around the keystone-odessa area lakes (nw hillsborough north of citrus park) that bumps us up about 1/2 a zone. This may not be feasible given the scale to include on the map. But a borderline 9b/10a is where I would put it.

In our area, there are flowering delonix, fruiting veitchia, roystonea, dypsis, fruiting mango, and large lychee and avocado trees + others. I will try to post some pics.

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ruskinPalms

(tropical1 @ Jul. 06 2007,23:36)

QUOTE
ruskinpalms

Great zone map overall. I think there is a definite lake effect microclimate though around the keystone-odessa area lakes (nw hillsborough north of citrus park) that bumps us up about 1/2 a zone. This may not be feasible given the scale to include on the map. But a borderline 9b/10a is where I would put it.

In our area, there are flowering delonix, fruiting veitchia, roystonea, dypsis, fruiting mango, and large lychee and avocado trees + others. I will try to post some pics.

I really need to visit the area. Sounds like some nice stuff up there. I have no doubt that the properties immediatly on the shores of all those lakes are on the lower side of 10A and maybe even better depending on the size of the lake, but they are some pretty small lakes (only a few pixels) on the map that I have been painting so it is tough to indicate these microclimates. I could just encircle the whole lake area with lower 10A zone, but that might be overestimating a lot of that area shaded. But, I still have some fine tuning to do on this map so I take all advice seriously.

Overall, most of the Tampa area looks quite vulnerable from an arctic blast from the north. I have a feeling many places are solid 10A's until the rarer advective freezes come through. I think there were lows around 18F or 19F during the eighties in the Tampa area. These are statisically outliers well off the normal distribution of temperatures however. Problem is that our palms are long lived and are bound to get nailed at some point by an "outlier" type event. I made my map with the outliers out of mind because I feel that we should plant more based upon the averages rather than the extremes. Just plant fast, cheap zone 10+ palms and don't get carried away with rarer, slower zone 10+ palms and you will achieve a tropical nirvana easier and cheaper to repair when the unlikely, yet inevitable,  happens.  That is not to say that you should not try rarer palms at all as you may stumble upon the holy grail of central Florida palm growing: the crownshafted palm that is cold AND frost hardy. Again, if you are on the poorer side like me, just try not to get carried away with this crusade. Now, where can I find some nice Dypsis decipiens to plant in my frosty patch of land ???   :;):

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tropical1

ruskinpalms -

Yes. Shading the whole area would probably overestimate it. The whole Tampa Bay area has been much warmer than it was in the recent past (as your zone map portrays), and I am always amazed when I find mature specimens that at one time were limited to favorable microclimates (St. Pete.) growing in some less favorable zone (i.e. Coconuts fruiting on North Dale Mabry). Hopefully, this climate trend continues.

I am all too familiar with the freezes, I had a large collection in the town and country area (1992-1996) less than a mile from Tampa Bay and lost 10 out of 12 newly planted  4' Wodyetias (which at the time were fairly rare and several coconut trees). All of the damage despite using diesel fired grove smudge pots! Of the coconuts we had the Jamaican Talls (seed from Fort Myers) did the best and came through.

BTW, I have dypsis decipiens and it is painfully slow, but should be worth the wait. Thanks for your work on the map.

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SubTropicRay

Bill,

If you include outlier events, the entire area is solidly entrenched in zone 9.  That's an easy map to make.  Pinellas County is almost as vulnerbale to arctic air unless one lives in immediate coastal areas.  By immediate, I mean literally rock throwing distance not 1 or 2 blocks.  You should have seen Sunken Gardens after the 1989 freeze.  It might as well have been Lutz.  St. Petersburg's low in 1983 was 22F when Tampa had 19F.  Noone escapes that type of event.

Ray

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Jeff in St Pete

Great map!  You guys are making me homesick.  I lived in South Tampa for 12 years before moving to Costa Rica and loved the bay area!  I still think of Tampa as "home".  

I agree with the comments about areas of Carrollwood getting a lot more frost or being colder.  I had friends who lived there and their banana trees would get damaged or frozen back most winters.  Meanwhile the ones in South Tampa would still be in perfect condition.  I always used banana plants as an indicator of the climate.  They were some of the first plants to get damaged by frost or cold weather every winter.

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ruskinPalms

Wow. I forgot I did this. Looks like past me put future me in a low 10A area so thumbs  up :D

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