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Justin

Suggestions for Privacy Hedge in Tropical Climate?

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Justin

I did some clearing at the front of my lot, and the clearing went well, but now it's pretty easy to see well into the yard, and I'm trying to limit looky-loos.  It's at the very front of the yard, and thus close to the power/telephone lines (about 25 feet up, give or take).  In other parts of the yard I have an Areca vestiara hedge, a Pinanga coronata hedge, and a Ptychosperma hedge.  I'm sure there are a number of different Dypsis that would be pretty nice.  I was also thinking maybe Oncosperma, but I'm loathe to include something with so many thorns, although that would make someone think twice about walking through there.

Ideas?  Photos?  Thanks in advance.

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Xerarch

Probably super common and looks like already occurred to you but Dypsis lutescens was the first thing that came to mind. They really are nice and make a good hedge. 

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Tyrone

Rhapis if your prepared to wait a good length of time.

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joe_OC

Jason had posted pics of how fast Pinanga coronata was growing for him.  Don't know how  tall you would want the hedge to be, but doubt it would ever reach your power lines.

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John hovancsek

I am thinking g of putting a salacca hedge in at my house. It will not reach the power lines and detour people from coming up into the yard

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sandgroper

I used golden canes, they took a few years to fill out but they look good and worked a treat.

1547259765449-2126163826.jpg

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Xenon

Maybe Euterpe oleracea for a similar look without the spines? I prefer Oncosperma though ^_^

Cyrtostachys elegans looks very nice too

Mauritiella or Licuala spinosa for something palmate 

Edited by Xenon

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Dypsisdean

Thinking outside the box - how about Arenga undulatifolia?

800px-8024069007_eb8ed061d1_o.jpg

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Justin

Thanks for all of the ideas.  I like many of them.  One item that crossed my mind after seeing some of these was a combined Dypsis hedge - baronii, albofarinosa, onilahensis, etc.  I like the Arenga idea also - I have one of those in the back of the lot, but that's not to say I can't have one (or three) up front as well.  The Euterpe idea would be perfect except I have a big clump nearby.

How tall do Kerriodoxas get?  None of mine are THAT tall yet, and if they don't get that tall they might make a decent hedge, even if not clumpers.  Maybe stagger them front and back, even and odd, something like that?  Thoughts on this idea?

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Palm Tree Jim
9 hours ago, Dypsisdean said:

Thinking outside the box - how about Arenga undulatifolia?

800px-8024069007_eb8ed061d1_o.jpg

Great suggestion!

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PalmTreeDude

Well, these are not exactly tropical palms, but if you want something that can act as a hedge for many years and then grow into tall palms, you could use young Sabal palmetto as a hedge. They get nice a bushy and stay that way for a long long long time. You could plant a row of younger ones and they will grow into a nice bush of a palm. Another reason I am suggesting Sabal palmetto is because I am assuming that they are uncommon for Hawaii. But, you would probably want to plant a shorter palm along with it for when that time comes and they grow tall. 

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.2287164,-80.786835,3a,20.5y,205.59h,80.28t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sVccVGGKX_kCI6LnkVAutjw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Edited by PalmTreeDude

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akamu

Dean that arenga is ridiculous i wish it was easier to grow  in California. For a privacy hedge  why not try  dypsis lafazamanga after  seeing  Jasons in full sun this might be a nice idea seeing how they divide  like  lutescens .

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DavidLee

Actually seen someone use Sabal palmetto as screening. I do like them. If I was in Hawaii I would use something else for screening. Clumping Palm are the best for that or you can use taller palms with shade tolerant smaller palms undermeath the taller ones.

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Hilo Jason

You might want to check out the Dypsis Lanceolata “robust form” that Floribunda has. They have nice 1 gallons available. You can see the parent plant there as well. I have bought several of them for different part of my yard, all along the borders to eventually give privacy. 

I also have two of them in my front hedge that is mostly Pinanga Coronata (blunt form). I must say though that the Pinanga Coronata are performing the best for me as far as growing quickly and filling in as a hedge like I was desiring. 

This photo shows the 2 D Lanceolata.  

2858267A-A145-4FAF-B1B2-46559FEE0BBB.thu

This photo below shows the difference between the Pinanga and the Dypsis.  I wish I would have used Pinanga all the way as I’m not 100% happy with how the Dypsis are not really filling in.  Although I do know that they will eventually.

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And here’s a photo of just some of the Pinanga. These were planted 5-6 feet apart. 

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this row is also under power lines. 

All plants were bought as 1 gallons from Floribunda and have been in the ground just over 1 year. 

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realarch

Justin, I was looking at my Arenga hookeriana the other day and thought what a great visual barrier it was. It would take a few years to fill the role of a barrier, but it's so effective. It might burn for awhile, but I'm sure would adapt, especially in east Hawaii. When I see Dypsis lutescens and other Arengas, I run the other way. 

Tim

P1060617.jpg

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Kim

Lots of good ideas here. I like Pinanga coronata hedges -- not too tall, and plenty dense. The Arenga pinnata idea looks effective, if you can give up that much real estate for your hedge.

My street front has a jumble of messy-looking trees, but it looks a lot better since I planted a few clumps of Monstera along the base. You could plant just about any palm you want and use Monstera or another ornamental to fill in the gaps along the base. Gardenia tubifera kula would work, and can be pruned to maintain the height and shape you wish, or certain Crotons can be kept dense enough to be useful that way. I have seen Heliconia indica used along street fronts to good effect as well, and combined with a few palms, could be spectacular.

I love the Arenga hookeriana, but mine really burned in sun, and have barely grown over the last few years, definitely not making the visual barrier I anticipated. :(

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Hilo Jason
20 hours ago, realarch said:

Justin, I was looking at my Arenga hookeriana the other day and thought what a great visual barrier it was. It would take a few years to fill the role of a barrier, but it's so effective. It might burn for awhile, but I'm sure would adapt, especially in east Hawaii. When I see Dypsis lutescens and other Arengas, I run the other way. 

Tim

P1060617.jpg

Cool suggestion Tim. You got me thinking outside the box a bit and what about Hydriastele Flabulata (might now be called Splendida)? 

Not sure how slow they are though?  Maybe Tim can post a pic of his?

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realarch

Yeah Jason, that is a good suggestion. I'll post a photo in a few.

Tim

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John hovancsek

My small one is planted in 1/2 a day of sun and is starting to look better so I'm sure they could look good

20190112_160859.jpg

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realarch

Here are a few photos of H. splendida, which was an excellent suggestion Jason. Full sun, can be pruned to suit various needs or looks, and big thick leaves forming a good visual barrier. I thin mine out and cut the taller canes, just looks more tidy to me and I don't need the visual barrier.  

Tim

 

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