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Josue Diaz

A few of my palms from today

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Josue Diaz
1 hour ago, Jubaea said:

Your garden is looking good.  I have seen some of your other threads and am surprised what you have growing.  I'm curious how your irrigate your palms?

Thank you! When i bought the house, I tore up the lawn, and in the process of doing so broke several PVC lines on the irrigation system. Some of the circuits are operational so modified those and converted them to drip. Others need repairing so for those areas I water by hand. It's on my long list of to-dos with a house this age.  

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Palmensammler

Hi Josue,

really enjoyed the pictures from your garden, especially the Chamaedorea ones as this is my favourit plant here in Germany as they can be grown inside very well.

Need more of them.

Eckhard

 

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Josue Diaz

I love chamaedorea! They are so forgiving! Here is where I grow most of mine. cataractarum is probably the most obvious here but see if you can spot benzeii. I have a few trunking radicalis which I sprouted this summer. Hoping to add a few to this area in the coming years. Care to share some of yours?

Resized_Screenshot_20181223-153840_Galle

27 minutes ago, Palmensammler said:

Hi Josue,

really enjoyed the pictures from your garden, especially the Chamaedorea ones as this is my favourit plant here in Germany as they can be grown inside very well.

Need more of them.

Eckhard

 

 

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enigma99
6 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

Thanks! My potted alfredii don't look too great. Maybe these just prefer being in the ground? Did yours suffer from cold damage?

My alfredii are pristine still. Although it didn't really drop much below 32 all winter here. But from my experience, they don't start getting roasted until dropping below 30

Edited by enigma99

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Hillizard
19 minutes ago, enigma99 said:

My alfredii are pristine still. Although it didn't really drop much below 32 all winter here. But from my experience, they don't start getting roasted until dropping below 30

It probably doesn't help that my potted B. alfredii is up against the house but has no overstory protection. So far at least it only has spots, not major leaf burn... yet. :unsure:

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Hillizard
1 hour ago, Josue Diaz said:

The leaf tips on the two oldest fronds are burned. The rest of the fronds appear unaffected. 

20190109_130538.jpg

Compare it to frost damage on the leaf tips to Syagrus romanzoffiana. If B. alfredii turns out to be a fast grower in my climate, then cosmetic damage like this won't really matter, much like it doesn't matter with S. romanzoffiana. 

20190109_130335.thumb.jpg.a5d9ac13cf8e84

I'm envious how well yours is weathering the winter.  I'll let you know the results of planting out my seedling B. alfredii this spring....

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Josue Diaz
26 minutes ago, enigma99 said:

My alfredii are pristine still. Although it didn't really drop much below 32 all winter here. But from my experience, they don't start getting roasted until dropping below 30

I think that if mine were surrounded by other foliage, that might have helped keep frost off. Mine's fully exposed though. Maybe as other palms near it mature, those will take the brunt of the frost. You must have a really good micro-climate. Care to share pics of yours? 

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Jubaea
3 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

Thank you! When i bought the house, I tore up the lawn, and in the process of doing so broke several PVC lines on the irrigation system. Some of the circuits are operational so modified those and converted them to drip. Others need repairing so for those areas I water by hand. It's on my long list of to-dos with a house this age.  

I noticed a lot better growth once I got all of my palms  hooked up to drip after about a year in the ground.  It is a lot easier to turn a dial or press a few buttons than dragging out a hose on a hot day where you really don't want to be outside in the sun.  If you can get yours done now before the heat sets in you can get better growth with less effort and focus your time on other projects.

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enigma99

Alfrediis with no overhead protection. Old burn is from last years February freeze

 

45FBE917-76BE-400C-B79A-298B30BBE64C.jpeg

Edited by enigma99
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enigma99

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Edited by enigma99
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enigma99

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enigma99

Alexandraes looking good throughout the yard

1B04573B-2DE1-43F0-81A3-987682D45501.jpeg

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Hillizard
16 hours ago, enigma99 said:

Alfrediis with no overhead protection. Old burn is from last years February freeze

 

45FBE917-76BE-400C-B79A-298B30BBE64C.jpeg

Enigma99: Those are all great looking B. alfredii!! I guess I just need to keep looking for their "sweet spot" (best microclimate) in my yard! :unsure:

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GottmitAlex

Josue and Derrick, very well done! 

 

 

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Palmensammler

Josue,

all my Chamaedoreas are still small seedlings and overwinter in the cold cellar (5°C and some light). I will take pictures in spring.

I too love the Chamaedorea palms. When I was in Costa Rica I saw so many different ones but wasn't able to identify them. As well I could only pick a few seeds.

For me they are outside from spring to autumn but still potted. Do you know a good source for seeds?

Eckhard

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enigma99

Some pics of my uncle’s front yard in Sacramento. Has a decent amount of species.

Mules are getting big!

AF016CD7-D0B7-4497-AF69-E0C1657C851A.jpeg

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enigma99

Cat palm wall

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Hillizard
4 minutes ago, enigma99 said:

Some pics of my uncle’s front yard in Sacramento. Has a decent amount of species.

Mules are getting big!

AF016CD7-D0B7-4497-AF69-E0C1657C851A.jpeg

Enigma99: I think he's located near where I live, so I'm curious what other palm species is he able to grow (and how long)?

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enigma99

Warm sunny day so decided to do some spring cleaning a little.

 

 

B5DF98D1-052A-42DA-B6CA-E8F9784E514B.jpeg

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enigma99

Bananas are a mess after the strong winds. Also looks like one banana sawed off a frond when it came down. Any guesses what it is? :) 

5-BC0-C82-E-C0-A4-48-F1-ACDF-ADFF1-A60-B
42-E279-F8-4-AEE-4812-B795-30440-ADD68-B
C8-BCA3-FA-7-F7-C-4-C13-A802-603-BFE7-C6
385-EB3-B3-5-F50-4-C71-BFF4-3-BDDF614618

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enigma99
16 hours ago, Hillizard said:

Enigma99: I think he's located near where I live, so I'm curious what other palm species is he able to grow (and how long)?

Yes, in fact I believe you two have met. (Perhaps)

What I can remember, in addition to those mules:

Coco queens, (Syagrus schizophylla x Syagrus romanzoffiana) and they are doing great

parajubaea torallyi var. torallyi

archontophoenix cunninghamiana

sabal blackburniana

 

Under the queen canopy in back:

archontophoenix alexandrae

beccariophoenix alfredii

arenga engleri

p. roebelenii

 

Think he might have a trunking form of chamaedorea radicalis, but not 100% 

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Hillizard
12 minutes ago, enigma99 said:

Yes, in fact I believe you two have met. (Perhaps)

What I can remember, in addition to those mules:

Coco queens, (Syagrus schizophylla x Syagrus romanzoffiana) and they are doing great

parajubaea torallyi var. torallyi

archontophoenix cunninghamiana

sabal blackburniana

 

Under the queen canopy in back:

archontophoenix alexandrae

beccariophoenix alfredii

arenga engleri

p. roebelenii

 

Think he might have a trunking form of chamaedorea radicalis, but not 100% 

It's possible I met him if he attended the NorCal PS meeting recently in Berkeley: http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/57500-northern-ca-ps-meeting/#comment-861688

Regardless, your uncle has a nice mix of palm species. After my queens grew too tall, too fast at my last place (I decided I didn't like their "telephone pole" look in a small yard), I switched to mules for overstory/sun protection at my current place. I had a small "coco queen" and P. roebelenii but lost them both to frost a couple of years ago. I always tell people my garden is an experimental work in progress and will never be "finished." :unsure:

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