Jump to content
Swolte

Palm companion plants!

Recommended Posts

Swolte

What are your favorite palm companion plants in your climate! You do surround them by grasses? Yucca? Hosta? Pics please!

Oh, and non-organic materials, like rock-types, count too, of course! 

Edited by Swolte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mdsonofthesouth

Yuccas and cycads for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff985

For me it’s white bird of paradise. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

Fatsia, Fuchsia, Abutilon, Daphne, Bromeliads, Gerbera Daisy, Cacti, and Agave. 

Edited by Palm crazy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NC_Palms

Philodendron, Agave, Tillandsia and native subtropical plants 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GaDawg

Azaleas, camellias, gardenias, Bird of Paradise, roses, sagos, cast irons, lilies.  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

Bananas, philodendrons, avocados, mango, bamboo, sugar cane, fountain grass, cycads, live oak, podocarpus, sea grapes, citrus, papayas, cacti, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmTreeDude

Bananas, Live Oaks, Southern species of pines such as our native Loblolly, and Bald Cypress if in a swampy area. I will be planting some Sabal minor this Spring under a Loblolly in my yard. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Josue Diaz

I use perennials and succulents. 

Screenshot_20190101-164239_Gallery.jpg

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
newtopalmsMD

Zebra Grass, fountain grass, blue dune grass, Japanese Silver grass, Alocasia, Black beauty and Pink China Colocasia, Banana, color guard Yucca, lambs ears, red hot poker, assorted hastas.   Zone 7a swimming pool area.  Black hardwood mulch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GaDawg

Since some of you listed trees, here is my list of trees I’ve planted or grew naturally in the yard: magnolia (southern grandiflora and little gem), live oak, a number of different hollies, crepe myrtle, ligustrium, Bottle brush and podicarpus 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merlyn2220

So far I have bananas, orange and white bird of paradise, agaves, cycads, heliconia, Hawaiian Ti (and other cordylines), oyster, variegated gingers, cast iron and similar, yucca, and pineapple.  The only other tree I've planted is Southern Magnolia, and a couple of large ponytail "palms" that aren't trees or palms...but sort of are.  Some of those won't live at all in College Station, but the orange bird of paradise, cycads, agaves and some others would probably be happy there!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mdsonofthesouth
On 1/1/2019, 9:18:06, PalmTreeDude said:

Bananas, Live Oaks, Southern species of pines such as our native Loblolly, and Bald Cypress if in a swampy area. I will be planting some Sabal minor this Spring under a Loblolly in my yard. 

 

I'm trying to make a pine flat in my yard with taeda, paulstris and maybe a elliottii skirted with yucca gloriosa, sabal minors, rhapidophyllum and maybe even a saw. Have it all mapped out just need a good source for all those plants and spring to come!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NC_Palms
13 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

I'm trying to make a pine flat in my yard with taeda, paulstris and maybe a elliottii skirted with yucca gloriosa, sabal minors, rhapidophyllum and maybe even a saw. Have it all mapped out just need a good source for all those plants and spring to come!

I would definitely try Serenoa. I saw one at the UNC Botanical Gardens in Chapel Hill which is a 7b climate. Also maybe Sabal etonia would work for your pine flatwood, I think they are at least a 7b palm as well.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmTreeDude
13 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

I'm trying to make a pine flat in my yard with taeda, paulstris and maybe a elliottii skirted with yucca gloriosa, sabal minors, rhapidophyllum and maybe even a saw. Have it all mapped out just need a good source for all those plants and spring to come!

Longleaf pine is endangered (I am sure you know that), so you will be helping the species out! Isn't Loblolly native to your area? I always found Loblolly interesting because once you get like 20 miles Northwest of where I am they seem to became very scarce and a little farther Northwest they are just gone. Yet here they are everywhere and are very weedy. But I like them, some people here chop them down because they can look scrubby (endless they are very tall). I have two that were planted as seedlings. One planted by my brother that was a foot tall and is now huge, at least 16 feet of trunk, and one I planted later on that was literally three inches tall and had barely any root, ripped out of the ground, and now it is almost as tall as me. I also planted that one in late fall. The first year of them being planted they are slow, but then when the next Spring comes they absolutely fly and will be huge before you know it. They like sun! We have pine flats of Loblolly pine here, they honestly look pretty cool and I would love to see some Sabal minor growing around the base of them like in the Carolinas. Basically, I love native Southern pine trees. I have some Silver Saw Palmetto seeds that I am trying to germinate now (nothing yet), hopefully one comes up because I would love to try a Saw Palmetto here (maybe replace my Mediterranean Fan Palm with one, don't get me wrong I love that palm, but I also love Saw Palmetto!). Good luck with this and keep us updated! 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sandgroper

I have a lot of pineapples planted throughout my palm garden, they look good and when they fruit you get another plant and a pineapple! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mdsonofthesouth
11 hours ago, NC_Palms said:

I would definitely try Serenoa. I saw one at the UNC Botanical Gardens in Chapel Hill which is a 7b climate. Also maybe Sabal etonia would work for your pine flatwood, I think they are at least a 7b palm as well.  

 

I'll have to look into that for sure!

 

10 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Longleaf pine is endangered (I am sure you know that), so you will be helping the species out! Isn't Loblolly native to your area? I always found Loblolly interesting because once you get like 20 miles Northwest of where I am they seem to became very scarce and a little farther Northwest they are just gone. Yet here they are everywhere and are very weedy. But I like them, some people here chop them down because they can look scrubby (endless they are very tall). I have two that were planted as seedlings. One planted by my brother that was a foot tall and is now huge, at least 16 feet of trunk, and one I planted later on that was literally three inches tall and had barely any root, ripped out of the ground, and now it is almost as tall as me. I also planted that one in late fall. The first year of them being planted they are slow, but then when the next Spring comes they absolutely fly and will be huge before you know it. They like sun! We have pine flats of Loblolly pine here, they honestly look pretty cool and I would love to see some Sabal minor growing around the base of them like in the Carolinas. Basically, I love native Southern pine trees. I have some Silver Saw Palmetto seeds that I am trying to germinate now (nothing yet), hopefully one comes up because I would love to try a Saw Palmetto here (maybe replace my Mediterranean Fan Palm with one, don't get me wrong I love that palm, but I also love Saw Palmetto!). Good luck with this and keep us updated! 

 

Yeah loblolly is native here, but is kinda sparse where I live. Go about 15 to 20 mins east and its everywhere and yes they are like weeds but I love them! They are practically the only tree in delmarva and SOMD. They do well anywhere in the state save for maybe Oakland...

 

I know longleaf is endangered which is one of the reasons why I'll try to grow them. I need to find a source for these closer to the DMV. As for loving southern yellow pines I can't help it as they are much nicer than the non replicating eastern white everyone seems to use. Look at a strand of loblolly and you'll see little seedlings everywhere, eastern white pine doesn't seem to do that here and they are pretty ugly compared to southern yellow pines...even short leaf!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Funkthulhu

I have a Sea Grape with stems bigger than my thumb.  The big round leaves are a nice contrast to the other plants in my Container Ranch...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chester B

Companion plants for palms in my backyard (lots of mositure and shadier) include:

Eucalyptus, bamboo, fatsia, fuschia, western sword fern, rice paper plant (T. "steroidal giant"), euphorbia, bananas, cannas, rhodos, melianthus, heavenly bamboos, Metapanax sp, Nothopanax, and Schefflera.

 

Frontyard (very hot and dry):

Assorted yuccas, agave, Cistus, Arbutus unedo, Ceanothus, assorted Euphorbia, Choisiya, Prickly pear,  oleander and Acca sellowiana.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mightycanes

Cannas mainly but have some yucca, iris, ginger and elephant ear in there.  Want to add some Nandinas

6FF92D1D-FCDE-4841-8414-A56AE0BA5DC2.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mightycanes

This showing the windmills.  It is a work in progress.

FA4EC846-3140-4A56-BC1D-76DBC409ECA6.jpeg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cbmnz

I use locally native broadleaf evergreens. Only downside is have to clip those constantly to get a nice full, rounded shape.

 

 

 

 

20180929_093209.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×