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sashaeffer

Azamax for spider mites?

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sashaeffer

Anyone use this with success?  I have always wanted something other than a foliage spray to control spider mites and this product can be used as a watering drench.

https://www.amazon.com/d/Fertilizers-Plant-Food/General-Hydroponics-GH2045-AzaMax-Ounce/B0032JYKGG/ref=sr_1_1?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1544306088&sr=1-1&keywords=Azamax

 

Currently using Avid with success it seems, but have to take palms to bathtub and wear a mask to spray them down. Any soil drench would be much easier.

Edited by sashaeffer
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RJ

Looks to be derived from neem oil. Have you tried just a neem oil spray? 

 

 

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sashaeffer

I have been killed two palms using it because it smother them even at recommended reading one of them was about a 3 foot tall lipstick P I have been killed to Palms using it because it smother them even at recommended rate one of them was about a 3 foot tall lipstick palm.

Also, I can use this as a soil drench versus spray which I prefer.

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Lard Greystoke

Virtually any arthropod can be killed by spraying it with water laced with a bit of detergent or soap.  This eliminates the surface tension of the water allowing it to overcome the waxy barrier protecting the arthropod's breathing apparatus.  You must hit the creature directly and drench it and there's no lasting effect.  So you would likely have to repeat the treatment.  

The soapy water also has the potential to break down the waxy layer coating the leaves so it could cause cosmetic damage.  One or two treatments shouldn't have much effect.

The treatment doesn't cost any money which is precisely why pesticide manufacturers etc don't want you to know about it.

 

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sashaeffer
2 hours ago, Lard Greystoke said:

Virtually any arthropod can be killed by spraying it with water laced with a bit of detergent or soap.  This eliminates the surface tension of the water allowing it to overcome the waxy barrier protecting the arthropod's breathing apparatus.  You must hit the creature directly and drench it and there's no lasting effect.  So you would likely have to repeat the treatment.  

The soapy water also has the potential to break down the waxy layer coating the leaves so it could cause cosmetic damage.  One or two treatments shouldn't have much effect.

The treatment doesn't cost any money which is precisely why pesticide manufacturers etc don't want you to know about it.

 

IE: Smothering the insect. I always wondered what kept the plant itself from being smothered as well.  

After my loss of two rare palms from spraying with a pre mix of Neem oil and writing about it on here(other thread) I had a reply from a garden center in Florida that said they use Neem oil spray, but after they spray in the evening, they spray the treated palms with water in the morning to wash off the neem spray. That to me made sense so plants don't suffocate as well.

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Lard Greystoke

I don't know what's in the mix of Neem oil so I can't speak to that.  Different commercial insecticidal soaps may contain ingredients other than soap so I can't speak to that either.

Pure soapy water should only affect the waxy layer coating the leaves and stems.  This layer is protective as well as attractive.  Losing it won't kill the plant outright but might make it more vulnerable to pests, etc.  

Soapy water will kill mites within seconds.  There's no residual effect so rinsing it off with pure water is not a bad idea.

 

 

 

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