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Howea forsteriana & belmoreana in Cape Coral, FL

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In response to a topic on the lack of Howea spp growing in FL, today I took the following photos of my H. forsteriana & H. belmoreana. I apologize that the images aren't as clear and open as I'd like but both palms hang out deep in my back yard jungle and protected by deep canopy from sun and summer heat. They are beautiful palms but cannot tolerate stand-alone planting spots here. They reputedly make fine houseplants but I was never able to find one when I lived up in VA.

Howea forsteriana: germinated in 2004 and planted a few years later. It has ~18" of clear trunk.

5c08271544743_Howeaforsteriana0112-05-185c08271fe8fd7_Howeaforsteriana0212-05-185c08272def14a_Howeaforsteriana0312-05-185c082746a54fd_Howeaforsteriana0412-05-185c082758a6566_Howeaforsteriana0512-05-185c0827689088b_Howeaforsteriana0612-05-185c08277ae7c75_Howeaforsteriana0712-05-185c082812237b7_Howeaforsteriana0812-05-18

 

Howea belmoreana: purchased as a 1g late 2005. Not yet trunking

5c082830b81ab_Howeabelmoreana0112-05-18.5c08283fc1261_Howeabelmoreana0212-05-18.5c08284b4cb7e_Howeabelmoreana0312-05-18.IMG_0453.thumb.JPG.025c653f82dd0bef2517d

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3 hours ago, PalmatierMeg said:

In response to a topic on the lack of Howea spp growing in FL, today I took the following photos of my H. forsteriana & H. belmoreana. I apologize that the images aren't as clear and open as I'd like but both palms hang out deep in my back yard jungle and protected by deep canopy from sun and summer heat. They are beautiful palms but cannot tolerate stand-alone planting spots here. They reputedly make fine houseplants but I was never able to find one when I lived up in VA.

Good job with these species.  I think you answered the question as to why they aren't frequent plantings in Florida: "cannot tolerate stand-alone planting spots" because they need deep canopy from sun and summer heat.  Your H belmoreana being slower than your forsteriana is pretty typical, but it will gain speed once it gets a little bigger

They do make good houseplants.  I got the one below from my old office, it was two plants growing in a 5 gallon pot, and they were clearing some furniture and miscellaneous items for a move.  That was just 20 years ago.  The larger plant outpaced the other and due to being planted on the north side of a two story house really stretched compared to others I had planted previously in full sun in that garden.  The taller plant succumbed to the leaning disease and was removed, leaving this one as a solitary.  The leaves are over the second story roof, and you can only see the trunk and it's immature fruit on the left side of the frame.   Of the two, I think that H belmoreana has the more unique appearance and I like it more for that reason (pictured in second photo).

Hopefully others in Florida will follow your positive planting methods and have good results as well!

20181123-104A1623.jpg

20181203-104A1790.jpg

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Howea forsteriana in the wild tends to grow on the sandier limestone soils of the island, but belmoreana you almost will never find on limestone sands. I used to think that belmoreana only grew at a mid altitude until I visited LHI and often found it close to sea level and almost always growing near streams or soaks on gravelly loams that have been derived from the decomposed granite on the island. So from what I observed belmoreana likes a more closed canopy, a slighter lower pH than forsteriana (not as much lime) and probably more water than forsteriana. Also belmoreana is quite a bit smaller in trunk diameter too. As far as altitude is concerned forsteriana grows to about 350m altitude approx and belmoreana about 450m and overlaps with the lower altitude Hedyscepe. So I think belmoreana is slightly more cool tolerant than forsteriana and probably enjoys the extra moisture that being up higher in a mountain provides. 

Just my observations.

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Wow! Those are spectacular specimens that could only present in that manner with phenomenal care. Outstanding!

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Tracy, I always preferred forsteriana (much more common here) but your belmoreana  is spectacular.

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29 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Tracy, I always preferred forsteriana (much more common here) but your belmoreana  is spectacular.

They are rare to see exceptional belmoreana examples.. but some are phenomenal! I think Darold a couple of those. I am quite smitten with mine and I just noticed the other day it's holding seed.

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18 hours ago, BS Man about Palms said:

I am quite smitten with mine and I just noticed the other day it's holding seed.

Very cool Bill!  I don't do the gardening at the rental property, but did find that the inflorescence on one of the H belmoreana there had been cut off.  He has left them on most of the palms there, but the seeding H belmoreana hangs over walkway stairs, so I presume that's why he removed them.  You can be the local seed source here in San Diego! :D

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Thank you very much for posting - the photos and the information about your Howeas (how old, when planted etc.) !

I purchased two four years ago - looking nice all the time but they are slow. Since our climate is almost similar to 

your`s, I am glad to know that the growth rate of my Howeas are somehow "normal" ;) 

photos attached:

First one,...

001.thumb.jpg.763b3261889c1e79e745f71134

 

002.thumb.jpg.96afb839c41c090d12373384bc

It is already trunking but taking its time...

Second one,...

003.thumb.jpg.15e0904ba1819ae717b565f190

Showing signs of a trunk, too.

004.thumb.jpg.c7841d1b56fb6cfe46aecd60b6

Best regards from Okinawa,

Lars

 

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Lars your Kentia looks happy.

 

Just checked your climate figures and your winters are bang on the same as Lord Howe Island but your summers are about 6C warmer, so I would think that once your day temps get 30C and above that your Kentia will slow down a bit.

 

On a different note I've got a Satakentia growing here. They'd probably grow fine on LHI if they were allowed on the island.

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