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Henoh

Trachycarpus fortunei in Zagreb, Croatia

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Henoh

Today I accidentally came across on fine specimens of T. fortunei. Heat island make them happy. 

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Edited by Henoh
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Henoh

Not far from previous location are aslo few nice exemplars. Pictures are from October.

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Henoh

Beautiful specimen in the city botanical garden.

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mdsonofthesouth

WOW! That is truly inspiring! Looking at the lows and highs of Zagreb shows its slightly colder there than here as well as the record lows being lower as well! If yall can grow them that big it gives me all the hope in the world I need to continue to grow them. 

Edited by mdsonofthesouth
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Henoh

We have one extremely episode here in winter 1984/85 whith low of -24 in the city botanical garden. That winter even Sabal minor killed in the botanical garden. But now winters are generally milder. 

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mdsonofthesouth
8 minutes ago, Henoh said:

We have one extremely episode here in winter 1984/85 whith low of -24 in the city botanical garden. That winter even Sabal minor killed in the botanical garden. But now winters are generally milder. 

 

Last time we got close to that was, if I remember correctly, was -18-20f and was in the 1980s as well. Your average in january is 26F for low and 38F for high while ours is 25F for low and 42F for highs. Pretty darn close and inspiring to see a close enough climate successfully growing them. Glad you posted these :D

Edited by mdsonofthesouth

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Henoh

I will try to find my old winter pictures and palms covered in snow and ice. One positive thing about our winters that we usually don’t have windchill effect. My garden is outside of the city and it’s colder 1-2 degrease of Celsius but Trachycarpus is keep growing, with damages from time to time. 

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dalmatiansoap

It's always nice to see your reports. According to all things happening lately with all infestations Zagreb is going to be last Trachycarpus oasis in this region.

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Henoh
1 hour ago, Henoh said:

I will try to find my old winter pictures and palms covered in snow and ice. One positive thing about our winters that we usually don’t have windchill effect. My garden is outside of the city and it’s colder 1-2 degrease of Celsius but Trachycarpus is keep growing, with damages from time to time. 

*degrees ;)

Ante, I hope Dalmatia will stay our palm haven. 

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Cikas
16 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

Last time we got close to that was, if I remember correctly, was -18-20f and was in the 1980s as well. Your average in january is 26F for low and 38F for high while ours is 25F for low and 42F for highs. Pretty darn close and inspiring to see a close enough climate successfully growing them. Glad you posted these :D

In Croatia we use Celsius, not Fahrenheit. -25C is -13F. :) 

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mdsonofthesouth
4 minutes ago, Cikas said:

In Croatia we use Celsius, not Fahrenheit. -25C is -13F. :) 

Lol definitely not a zone 5!

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Henoh

I'm trying to find my pictures of Trachycarpus under the snow that not kidnapped by one, once popular, image hosting company. I find only few pictures from January 17, 2009. 

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Axel Amsterdam

i love the look of trachies in croatia like this one I took. Do you think this neat arrangement of undamaged fronds is a result of a variety or lack of windy conditions?

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Edited by Axel Amsterdam
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dalmatiansoap

Definitely wind conditions play huge roll on Trachy look here. That picture is taken somewhere in Istria I guess and they have the best conditions for Trachycarpus sp. Here on South, they are exposed to strong winds and they are bmaybe the most "ugliest" palm sp.

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Axel Amsterdam

yes correct in Istria. There and along the coastline of Slovenia and Italy i have seen trachies that makes you love them. Full of perfect fronds, really green. 

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Eric Thompson

Wow! Really good looking

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Henoh
20 hours ago, Axel Amsterdam said:

Opatija in Croatia must be home of some of the most beautiful trachies I have ever seen

 

https://goo.gl/maps/Dzv7yM4wBGA2

Unfortunately, they are now under attack of Paysandisia archon.

Edited by Henoh

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Axel Amsterdam

ah thats really sad, they look like they have been growing there forever. 

Can u tell me a little about the climate in opatija, sunny, little wind and little frost?   

 

The trachies in Opatija look even more gracious greener and tropical than trachies in Umag in my opinion. More similar to the swiss lakes trachies. 

Edited by Axel Amsterdam

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Henoh

You are right. Opatija have very mild climate similar with the north Italian and the south Swiss lakes. Strong winds are rare events. City is protected from cold northern winds and have regular rain pattern during whole year. Opatija climate 

Trachycarpus are introduced in Opatija (Abbazia-Italian name for city) a 150 years ago and city is very popular tourist destination during Austro-Hungarian Empire. 

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Edited by Henoh
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Axel Amsterdam

Thanks Henoh, for the information and the wonderful postcards. I had a look on street view but despite their mild climate they don't have the towering high CIDP's or washingtonia's (like on the cote D'azur).  I guess they must experience a more serious frost every decade or so. Or perhaps, it's more historical/cultural to keep planting trachycarpus.

Anyway, the trachies are beautiful and really add to the atmosphere.  

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Henoh

They have rare P. canariensis and W. filifera but you are right, every few decades there is cold event which kill from time to time some Phoenix canariensis and Washingtonias. During 1950s prolonged cold finished even old Jubaea chilensis. 

Old pictures of P. canariensis and T. fortunei in Opatija

Few pictures of still living W.filifera (or filibusta) in villa Ariston (photo credit - Igor Hoegler) and Phoenix canariensis  Hotel Milenij.

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Edited by Henoh

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Axel Amsterdam

Thanks again for this new information. The filifera is really huge. I didnt think they could be found this large in that area. 

I read that Opatija is fairly humid compared to Zadar or even more south for example. This probably helps to bring out the best in the trachies too i suppose. 

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Cikas

Dalmatia has hot mediterranean climate. Opatija has Cfa Humid subtropical climate. They are alot more humid in summer than Dalmatia. But winters are much colder. 

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Henoh

One more thing about Trachycarpus fortunei in Opatija area. They are naturalizing in nearby forest.

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Axel Amsterdam

Opatija seems very close to Lago Maggiore/Lugano etc. Sunny, higher humidity, some wintercold, little wind and an ancient trachy history. 

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Axel Amsterdam
On 10-1-2019 14:16:22, Henoh said:

One more thing about Trachycarpus fortunei in Opatija area. They are naturalizing in nearby forest.

i once read that blackbirds eat and distribute the seeds around the suisse lakes, but in my area  blackbirds dont touch the trachycarpus seeds nor any other birds. 

 

Someone wrote he believes trachy seeds were distributed in the forests by humans which makes some sense since they grow in groves together and not as solitary  plants. The other possibility is geographical with seeds sliding down from gardens from the numerous slopes by heavy rains.

Edited by Axel Amsterdam

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