Help!! - Dypsis Mananjarensis showing some rot

16 posts in this topic

About 3 weeks ago I noticed the newest spear on my Dypsis Mananjarensis (Mealy Bug) not looking so good.  I immediately started applying Hydrogen Peroxide, almost daily.  It always fizzles and bubbles A LOT!  So I just keep applying everyday, usually in the morning so that it has the time to soak in all day and then hopefully dry out.  

Nov. 8 pic:

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The good news is that I've marked the petiole and it keeps pushing.  The new spear however has completely rotted off though and there is no longer any sign of it.  

Nov. 27 pic:

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You can see where the spear used to be and you can see that the white mealy bug markings are actually brown in that area now.  

I will say that the new spear did not completely pull, at least not from what I could tell.  More like just rotted off as it pushed its way out.  It was very brown and rotted as it pushed out.  The problem is now I don't see anything as far as a new spear goes.  

At one point I also sprayed a little bit of Seven around the growing point because when I poured in the peroxide, a lot of ants and even a couple of slugs would come crawling up out of the growth area.  So I figured that wasn't good!  

I marked the growing area again 2 days ago and it has pushed an inch already.  You can see another mark up the petiole about 5 inches higher.  So it is pushing! 

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Any advice or recommendations besides Peroxide and the Seven that I already sprayed?  Should I keep applying Peroxide daily or is that too much moisture?  

Thankfully it looks like we have 3 days straight of no rain (that's a lot here!) so I think that should be helpful.  

Thanks for reading and in advance for any helpful tips.  

 

Here's a picture of the entire plant.  It's been very happy and growing fast, just opened it's 4th new leaf in 1 year since being planted!  I hope it can just push through this funk.  

IMG_1378.JPG

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Looks like your palm is gonna make it Jason. It looks similar to what happened recently to my D. ampasindavae. Top half of new leaf just rotted out, but after a few peroxide treatments, the remainder of the spear was solid. It's now back on track and as beautiful as ever.

Tim

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The exact thing happened to my dark mealybug, applied peroxide a couple times and cut off the rotten stuff, and a new spear gradually came out. The rotten one kept pushing, but never opened or developed. The next shoot is healthy.

good luck

aloha

 

 

 

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Colin and Tim - thanks for the replies.  Do you think it's possible to apply too much peroxide, or apply it too often?  

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I've also had similiar happen to one of my Dysis dark mealy bugs and a  prestoniana, but I suspected it was some type of insect attack.    I didn't treat either of them and they just grew out.

 

This is both sides of a damaged emerging prestoniana spear.

qbccjxz.jpg

3jx1FcV.jpg

 

This is a dark mealy bug that was damaged just as the spear began to emerge.

00tJqom.jpg

 

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7 minutes ago, steve99 said:

I've also had similiar happen to one of my Dysis dark mealy bugs and a  prestoniana, but I suspected it was some type of insect attack.    I didn't treat either of them and they just grew out.

 

This is both sides of a damaged emerging prestoniana spear.

qbccjxz.jpg

3jx1FcV.jpg

 

This is a dark mealy bug that was damaged just as the spear began to emerge.

00tJqom.jpg

 

Thanks Steve, I'm hoping this does the same.  It's been a fast grower so seems like it will want to push through this.  

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You know Steve, your right about not needing to treat spear rot or damage all of the time. I think in most cases the palm will recover on it's own. I use peroxide as more of a precaution, mainly because it's inexpensive and easy to use. You never know what's going on down in the growing point. 

Tim

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Update on this palm: The good news is that it's pushing fairly quickly as you can see from where I marked it. But the bad news is that there's still no sign of the new spear / growing point. This tells me that the rot was deep in the growing area inside the palm. I will rejoice when I see it actually poke it's way out of there for the first time.  Lots of nasty brown areas pushing out now that were rotting down inside the palm before pushing out. 

IMG_1393.thumb.JPG.bd1a242983d5066f822a1

IMG_1394.thumb.JPG.a4dc6b2fba064bd107f7a

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It is also interesting that I am fighting this very same issue on a couple other heeled Malagasy palms. My lemurophoenix is opening a new red leaf right now and looks perfectly happy but I just noticed the new spear following up the new flush is looking dead.

 

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I wonder if the SO2 or other gases from volcano might be attributing to this?

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The gases were months ago, and the wind didn't make its way from Leilani to Hilo - certainly not enough to harm any palms.

I would suggest the use of peroxide, and the other thing I might recommend - depending on what else you see on the rotted parts - is use of a systemic insecticide/fungicide like the Bayer stuff in the blue bottle.  It won't harm the plant, there is no edible fruit that might get tainted, and worst case you've just wasted a bit of the liquid.  Best case you've killed whatever little bug might be down in there, chewing on stuff.

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11 hours ago, Justin said:

The gases were months ago, and the wind didn't make its way from Leilani to Hilo - certainly not enough to harm any palms.

I would suggest the use of peroxide, and the other thing I might recommend - depending on what else you see on the rotted parts - is use of a systemic insecticide/fungicide like the Bayer stuff in the blue bottle.  It won't harm the plant, there is no edible fruit that might get tainted, and worst case you've just wasted a bit of the liquid.  Best case you've killed whatever little bug might be down in there, chewing on stuff.

Thanks for that tip Justin. I will do that right away. I've been treating with peroxide almost daily, with lots of sizzling following each treatment. 

I also just cut off a couple feet of new spear on a Dypsis Lastelliana that was browning from the tip down. Ended up being some sort of little larvae burrowing around in there. If something like that is happening to my mealy bug, I'm not able to see it so the systemic fungicide is what I need.  

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12 hours ago, joe_OC said:

I wonder if the SO2 or other gases from volcano might be attributing to this?

Yeah, Justin is right about this. During the entire eruption there were only a couple of days that I could smell the SO2 here in Hilo. Most days our air quality was excellent thanks to the tradewinds blowing in our favor. Kona on the other hand had it really bad. 

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20 hours ago, Hilo Jason said:

I also just cut off a couple feet of new spear on a Dypsis Lastelliana that was browning from the tip down. Ended up being some sort of little larvae burrowing around in there. If something like that is happening to my mealy bug, I'm not able to see it so the systemic fungicide is what I need.  

Hi Jason.  I was recently reading the post on someone else's problems with Cycad Aulacaspis Scale (Aulacaspis yasumatsui) in Florida and the potential solutions for treating it.  While Imidacloprid containing products like the one from Bayer may work, you may want to look into one of the other systemic insecticides if it doesn't work.  The Bayer product is probably a pretty good place to start.  I'm very careful on when and where I use it, as it has been associated with bee die offs when feeding blooming plants with it.  I used to use it on my Hibiscus when whitefly arrived here in California, but stopped because I like my neighborly little pollinators.  Doesn't look like it will be a problem with your mealy bug though as it is a ways off from flowering still.  Just amazing how much faster those buggers grow in Hawaii compared to here.  We always enjoy seeing your gardens progress!!   Keep it going.

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20 hours ago, Tracy said:

Hi Jason.  I was recently reading the post on someone else's problems with Cycad Aulacaspis Scale (Aulacaspis yasumatsui) in Florida and the potential solutions for treating it.  While Imidacloprid containing products like the one from Bayer may work, you may want to look into one of the other systemic insecticides if it doesn't work.  The Bayer product is probably a pretty good place to start.  I'm very careful on when and where I use it, as it has been associated with bee die offs when feeding blooming plants with it.  I used to use it on my Hibiscus when whitefly arrived here in California, but stopped because I like my neighborly little pollinators.  Doesn't look like it will be a problem with your mealy bug though as it is a ways off from flowering still.  Just amazing how much faster those buggers grow in Hawaii compared to here.  We always enjoy seeing your gardens progress!!   Keep it going.

Hey Tracy, thanks for the input on this.  I am very cautious about any sort of insecticides and also herbicides in my garden.  I don't spray any weeds at this point, I just mulch and hand pick.  Which can be a lot of work for a 1/2 acre in Hilo, but I enjoy it and as long as I'm able to, I'll keep it up like this.  I did treat this Dypsis with some of the Bayer insectice yesterday and like you said, it won't be flowering anytime soon, so shouldn't harm any bees.  I'm hoping this is a one time application that knocks out whatever was happening and takes care of it.  I also applied a bit of the bayer insecticide to my Lemurophoenix as well.  Hoping for the best.  

 

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Jason, it appears to be growing still which is great. I share the same outlook on chemical use in the garden but a times it is a necessary evil.

Whatever it was, lets hope you got it with the peroxide/Bayer and it will push through.

Keep us updated my friend.

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