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Mauritia flexuosa growing in Brevard County!

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Unbelievable Mauritia flexuosa growing in Micco at Jason and Sues beautiful Garden. Jason first photo, my husband Greg in third photo. This palm survived the 2010 freeze!

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Wunderbar!!!!

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Fantastic fronds on that thing!

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Do they ever trunk?

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Amazing! What is an uber-tropical palm like this (Amazon) doing in Brevard County! That is an A Plus and thank you!

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They form large trunks, especially in wetland situations. Stunning palms!

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Cool as heck! There is hope after all for my little bitty one!!! 

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3 hours ago, bubba said:

Amazing! What is an uber-tropical palm like this (Amazon) doing in Brevard County! That is an A Plus and thank you!

Do you know if this palm is as cold hardy as Euterpe oleracea?

 

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I didn't realize this species grew so large. Thanks for the photos.

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On 11/4/2018, 12:06:07, GottmitAlex said:

Do you know if this palm is as cold hardy as Euterpe oleracea?

 

He can't grow Euterpe at all so it must be hardier. From what they said, it's the only Mauritia in Brevard, and it is planted on the edge of a pond, you just can't see in the Photo.

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Great stuff Charlene! I would of never guessed.

Very nice!

Dominic 

 

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Micco is right on the coast and zone 10a so I don't see why it wouldn't grow there?

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Micco isn't on the coast, it's on the mainland, and he's quite a bit W of US1, but the Indian River is on the E side of US1, so he's got that.

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In 2004, Richard Moyroud was growing these at his nursery in Broward County. And in 2010, at the start of the Minas Gerais post-tour after the Rio biennial, one of the first stops in the southern part of the state was to a Mauritia flexuosa grove said to be the southernmost such grove in South America. One of the ones I am growing comes from a seed collected there.

 

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This is great to hear. Mine is quite large at the nursery now and has just begun to flower. It is just getting ready to start showing some trunk. Mine saw 31 back in 2010 and I was pleasantly surprise to see not only it survived, but had no leaf damage.

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Awesome!!!!

I have one small one planted out here in a swampy location. It has been through 2 winters and one hurricane where it got buried under debris but survived. I planted another this summer.

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I had one for years, really the cold never seemed to harm it but one summer in just decided to croak.

 

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What a handsome palm!  Most palms look really good when young, but this palm looks better and better as it matures.  

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On 11/5/2018, 10:45:24, NatureGirl said:

Micco isn't on the coast, it's on the mainland, and he's quite a bit W of US1, but the Indian River is on the E side of US1, so he's got that.

Close enough :lol:

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On 11/6/2018, 11:32:31, joe_OC said:

What a handsome palm!  Most palms look really good when young, but this palm looks better and better as it matures.  

Agree!  :greenthumb:  Just wish it could handle zone 9...

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Do you have any idea how old this plant is? I used to live in Brazil and I planted a seedling of this species in my yard there, and it was very slow. Here are a couple of photos of this species in habitat in Brazilian savannas. They are very majestic, particularly when they are found in open grasslands like this. 

 

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2 hours ago, RaleighNC said:

Do you have any idea how old this plant is? I used to live in Brazil and I planted a seedling of this species in my yard there, and it was very slow. Here are a couple of photos of this species in habitat in Brazilian savannas. They are very majestic, particularly when they are found in open grasslands like this. 

 

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Oooooo on savannah! Maybe they DON'T have to grow in water!! :yay:

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He said it was planted in 2006 and it grew pretty fast. 

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4 hours ago, Missi said:

Oooooo on savannah! Maybe they DON'T have to grow in water!! :yay:

I should have explained those pics a little better. All those palms have wet feet. The trees in the first pic are along a stream, and in the second they are in a seep area draining into a stream. The soils would definitely be saturated in the wet season, and probably in the dry season as well. 

The seedling I once had survived in well-drained soils and was always making progress, but maybe it was so slow because it really wanted saturated soils. 

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I've seen healthy ones growing high and dry in people's gardens. But in warm, humid climates. Of my three survivors, two are in low spots, but not inundated, and the third is higher up. I lost three, two in other wet spots and one high and dry.

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21 hours ago, RaleighNC said:

I should have explained those pics a little better. All those palms have wet feet. The trees in the first pic are along a stream, and in the second they are in a seep area draining into a stream. The soils would definitely be saturated in the wet season, and probably in the dry season as well. 

The seedling I once had survived in well-drained soils and was always making progress, but maybe it was so slow because it really wanted saturated soils. 

DARN! My hope is dashed!

18 hours ago, mike in kurtistown said:

I've seen healthy ones growing high and dry in people's gardens. But in warm, humid climates. Of my three survivors, two are in low spots, but not inundated, and the third is higher up. I lost three, two in other wet spots and one high and dry.

YES! My hope is restored!!

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