Serenoa repens zone

14 posts in this topic

Hey Everyone!

I have seen a lot of different zone recommendations for Serenoa. So I wanted to ask the pros,

What zones are they really good in?

Anyone have any growing in 8a? Would love to see some pics. Here's one of mine.

IMG_20180924_142735.jpg

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Green are good for 8b. Silver are 8a and will burn around 10-12f. Some trunk death will occur sub 10f but they'll all come back from the roots if it gets too cold. Cold exposed wind will exacerbate trunk damage and a nice full hedge of them will fair much better than a solitary plant. 

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So certainly not as cold hardy as some claim. Especially the greens. 

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There's some silvers downtown Greenville at a Bank that survive.

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1 hour ago, Brad Mondel said:

There's some silvers downtown Greenville at a Bank that survive.

Good to know! I'll be sticking with the silver from now on

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On 9/24/2018, 7:51:15, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Green are good for 8b. Silver are 8a and will burn around 10-12f. Some trunk death will occur sub 10f but they'll all come back from the roots if it gets too cold. Cold exposed wind will exacerbate trunk damage and a nice full hedge of them will fair much better than a solitary plant. 

The green form is native up into zone 8b GA, north of Tifton and also around I-16 north of Vidalia.  I suspect palms from that provenance should be cold hardy to at least zone 8a, possibly slightly colder.

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49 minutes ago, Bigfish said:

The green form is native up into zone 8b GA, north of Tifton and also around I-16 north of Vidalia.  I suspect palms from that provenance should be cold hardy to at least zone 8a, possibly slightly colder.

I would suggest the green form is native to 8A.  They are found up the SC coastline and Savannah river valley, areas that were unquestionably 8A on 1990 and earlier maps.

Steve

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I have silvers in the ground now and greens in pots. Will plant the greens in the ground come spring. Will be a good experiment. Thanks for the additional input!

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I have a Serenoa reopens and serenoa repens ‘cinera’ that I bought recently.They have some kind of browning on their fronds, anyone know what this is and how to stop further browning? 

 

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Edited by Pittsburghpalmtropicals
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Does anyone have experience up north like jersey ny penn state Ontario etc in putting them in the ground and protecting them? Or does frozen. Roots take them out?

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3 hours ago, Rickybobby said:

Does anyone have experience up north like jersey ny penn state Ontario etc in putting them in the ground and protecting them? Or does frozen. Roots take them out?

The silver variety of serenoa repens should work if given adequate winter protection. The soil of the Northeast and Canada may be the biggest problem since these palms seem to thrive best in sandy soil. 

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The clay of the South East and Mid Atlantic disappears north of Jersey. I've lived in just about every state in NE except CT and RI and there is little clay except in a few locations. Can't speak for Ontario though. Maine is mostly sand and much of NH and MA are as well. It's certainly not beach sand but it's derived from granite and drains very well. 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, NC_Palms said:

The silver variety of serenoa repens should work if given adequate winter protection. The soil of the Northeast and Canada may be the biggest problem since these palms seem to thrive best in sandy soil. 

Where I live is sandy soil the main product of my area is tobacco and ginseng you don’t have to be near the coast to have sandy soil 

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