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Sabal_Louisiana

95 potential Palm species that could be grown on the northern Gulf Coast of the US

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Eric in Orlando
On 12/28/2018, 11:23:23, krishnaraoji88 said:

Just to throw another wrench in the system here I thought of something else. When I was originally buying my Arenga engleri from a well respected SoFlo nursery (I bought 10 or so) there seemed to be two forms. There was one that had early clustering, brighter green leaves, and was more plumose. The others were a more dull green, didn't cluster until after 2-3 years in the ground (they had a large central leader), and leaves were in a single plane. All of the early cluster bright green ones died with freezes in the 23-25 degree range while the more dull green ones barely had any damage even when we had the 2010 freeze which killed young Queen palms here. Either there are two forms of this palm going around, the dull ones were Ryukyuenses, or there is another species often confused as engleri. Im not sure what the answer was. In response to the earlier question about telling the difference I will say that all my seed grown Ryukyuensis resembled the dull green single plane form that was hardy for me. :blink:

They might have had Arenga tremula mixed in. It can look similar to A. engleri but is more tender. Foliage will burn around 28F. I have seen some specimens planted at local theme parks from SoFL source. They were acquired as A. engleri but are A. tremula.

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Sandy Loam

Wow, now I am wondering if the large clusters planted around the Tampa Lowry Park Zoo or a hybrid of Arenga Engleri/Tremula.

 

Eric, your posts above are incredibly informative, as always.  Thank you!  I can't believe how different the Okinawa variety is.  It is very silver on the leaflet undersides and has such a stiffer-looking, upright growth habit. (Sorry for my poor descriptors.  I am not a botanist, am not a scientist of any type, and am not a nurseryman either)

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Eric in Orlando

Let me correct myself, I didn't mean they are Arenga engleri /tremula hybrids. Just that there is a nursery/nurseries in SoFL selling A. tremula as A. engleri. This wouldn't be a big deal if the plants stay in SoFL or the warmer parts of central FL. But people are going to be disappointed if they get planted where it will drop below 27-28F on a regular basis.

I've never really seen or heard about any Arenga hybrids (just Caryota). But we may have one here.We were given a couple plants grown from Arenga hookeriana seed (from a SoFL botanic garden) but was told there was A. engleri nearby. The juvenile plants looked like A. hookeriana but as they grew they began getting divided pinnate leaves like A. engleri. But they haven't grown as big as A. engleri and they were planted back in 2003.

 

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Tropicdoc

If anyone knows where to get reliable Arenga ryukensis seedlings, speak up! Could be a nice reliable understory palm for me. I am leaning on Chaemadorea radicalis in that role right now.

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Alicehunter2000
On 1/3/2019, 8:25:59, Tropicdoc said:

If anyone knows where to get reliable Arenga ryukensis seedlings, speak up! Could be a nice reliable understory palm for me. I am leaning on Chaemadorea radicalis in that role right now.

Maybe TexasColdHardyPalm?

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Merlyn2220

Without turning this into an Arenga Engleri thread, I picked this one up from MB.  I think he bought it from a nursery in South FL  Any idea if this is an Engleri, a Tremula, Ryukuensis or Okinawa types?  The leaves are fairly dark green and flat plane near the tip of the frond, but are in a bit of a V shape closer to the base.  The leaflets appear to be somewhat less plumose and spaced a bit further apart than the large Arenga Engleri cluster near the bench at Leu Gardens. I also noted the rachis is a bit speckled with white. The leaflet underside is greyish, but not quite silvery like a Bismarck. Attached are a few pictures.

P1040399 cropped.jpg

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P1040403 cropped.jpg

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Eric in Orlando

I think it looks more like A. tremula.

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