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palmad Merc

Rare palm seeds.com (order receipt test)

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palmad Merc

Ok, I've received a new letter from rare palm seeds, and in the letter have stated the seeds I've been waiting for Dypsis baronii black petiole.

I've placed my order off 200 seeds with a phytosanitary certificate with express post on the 1/6/18

Seed's are marked NEW

I will be posting outcomes of 

Money's being transferred

Delivering date, freshness of seed

Germination rate, ect,ect.

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GeneAZ

You seem to indicate that you ordered them in January and haven't received them yet.  Is that correct?

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Josue Diaz

It could be 6/1/18 just in a day/month/year format. Lots of other countries use this format

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John in Andalucia
37 minutes ago, Josue Diaz said:

It could be 6/1/18 just in a day/month/year format. Lots of other countries use this format

'Day, Month, Year' is the date format overwhelmingly used worldwide - the exception being the USA (and a few other places).

I also ordered from RPS this month. They have the A. vestiaria that I've wanted for a while now, but knowing how short the viability is of this species, I asked Toby if the order could be expedited. My account was debited after 6 days, which means I should have my order within 2 weeks, instead of the usual 3 weeks for delivery to the UK. 

I have mixed feelings with RPS. On the one hand, they occasionally get the stuff nobody else is able to source, but out of 18 small packet orders in the last 12 months, I've had 9 packets that did absolutely nothing. Not even one sprout. I've also bought the same seeds again from other sources and had great germination, so I can't figure it out. I always buy newly listed stuff. The exception - this month - I really want to grow a couple of S. amara. The seeds have been on RPS for a few months now, but I'll take a chance. I find that's what keeps me addicted to this hobby! With 10 seeds, all I want is one or two strong sprouts. To get nothing when you know what you're doing feels unjust, especially when you also consider that RPS almost never respond to emails. 

Here is my 'bad' list:

Basselinia glabrata 0/10
Ceroxylon quindiuense  0/10
Dypsis ambositrae  0/10
Dypsis leptocheilos  0/10
Geonoma schottiana  0/10
Kentiopsis oliviformis  0/10
Licuala peltata var. sumawongii  0/10
Ravenea glauca 'Andringitra'  0/10
Rhopalostylis sapida sp. 'Oceana'  0/10

 

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palmad Merc
4 hours ago, palmad Merc said:

I'm from Australia l, we use day/month/year format

 

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palmad Merc
2 hours ago, John in Andalucia said:

'Day, Month, Year' is the date format overwhelmingly used worldwide - the exception being the USA (and a few other places).

I also ordered from RPS this month. They have the A. vestiaria that I've wanted for a while now, but knowing how short the viability is of this species, I asked Toby if the order could be expedited. My account was debited after 6 days, which means I should have my order within 2 weeks, instead of the usual 3 weeks for delivery to the UK. 

I have mixed feelings with RPS. On the one hand, they occasionally get the stuff nobody else is able to source, but out of 18 small packet orders in the last 12 months, I've had 9 packets that did absolutely nothing. Not even one sprout. I've also bought the same seeds again from other sources and had great germination, so I can't figure it out. I always buy newly listed stuff. The exception - this month - I really want to grow a couple of S. amara. The seeds have been on RPS for a few months now, but I'll take a chance. I find that's what keeps me addicted to this hobby! With 10 seeds, all I want is one or two strong sprouts. To get nothing when you know what you're doing feels unjust, especially when you also consider that RPS almost never respond to emails. 

Here is my 'bad' list:

Basselinia glabrata 0/10
Ceroxylon quindiuense  0/10
Dypsis ambositrae  0/10
Dypsis leptocheilos  0/10
Geonoma schottiana  0/10
Kentiopsis oliviformis  0/10
Licuala peltata var. sumawongii  0/10
Ravenea glauca 'Andringitra'  0/10
Rhopalostylis sapida sp. 'Oceana'  0/10

 

When your Areca Vestiaria seeds arrive, if they are fresh they should be a light brown to yellow colour, and you should see a veiny texture to them.

I received a bunch of them from Dypsis dean, he's a legend of a bloke, now my place is overrun with vestiarias.

I presume the black petiole should be fresh as they are marked NEW and I'm getting express post.

I don't know if they have the seed's yet from their supplier or if they have them now, with or without the flesh still on.

Does anyone know the shelf life to them, once they are cleaned?

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Tyrone

If your seed is wild collected then your germination results could be very hit and miss. With the rarer species such as Ravenea glauca (Andinigitra) for example that would definitely be the case and Ravenea tends to have short viability to begin with. With those sort of species I'll order around 100 and hope for the best. However if the seed is from cultivation and the donor understands palms and germination etc and if rps gets the seed out in a timely manner and quarantine doesn't confiscate your seed then sit on them for ages (leave them in a corner, go on holidays, then deal with them later) then you should get decent germination, provided your technique is also in line with what the species wants.

With D baronii blackstem if the seed has been expedited quickly you should be ok. Areca vestiara and true tropical rainforest species can be problematic getting to Australia due to short viability of the seed. 

RPS has been a great source of seed and palms for me but it can be very hit and miss with the rarer stuff but that's the path I chose to walk growing rare palms. Seed I collect myself tends to perform the best. So with rare species from RPS I'm happy with 5-10% germination but am very happy with 50% germination. When I get 100% I'm ecstatic and it does happen.

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palmad Merc

I've had excellent results from the folk on Palm talk.

Pinanga caesia from Naturegirl

Dp lastelliania, dp leptocheilos from Colin peters

Photo, top Areca Vestiaria,mid left pinanga cassia,right dp leptocheilos

Bottom dp lastelliania,and  heat controlled germination station.

Im hanging for my latest edition.

 

 

PhotoGridLite_1528415114587.jpg

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Rose
5 hours ago, John in Andalucia said:

'Day, Month, Year' is the date format overwhelmingly used worldwide - the exception being the USA (and a few other places).

I also ordered from RPS this month. They have the A. vestiaria that I've wanted for a while now, but knowing how short the viability is of this species, I asked Toby if the order could be expedited. My account was debited after 6 days, which means I should have my order within 2 weeks, instead of the usual 3 weeks for delivery to the UK. 

I have mixed feelings with RPS. On the one hand, they occasionally get the stuff nobody else is able to source, but out of 18 small packet orders in the last 12 months, I've had 9 packets that did absolutely nothing. Not even one sprout. I've also bought the same seeds again from other sources and had great germination, so I can't figure it out. I always buy newly listed stuff. The exception - this month - I really want to grow a couple of S. amara. The seeds have been on RPS for a few months now, but I'll take a chance. I find that's what keeps me addicted to this hobby! With 10 seeds, all I want is one or two strong sprouts. To get nothing when you know what you're doing feels unjust, especially when you also consider that RPS almost never respond to emails. 

Here is my 'bad' list:

Basselinia glabrata 0/10
Ceroxylon quindiuense  0/10
Dypsis ambositrae  0/10
Dypsis leptocheilos  0/10
Geonoma schottiana  0/10
Kentiopsis oliviformis  0/10
Licuala peltata var. sumawongii  0/10
Ravenea glauca 'Andringitra'  0/10
Rhopalostylis sapida sp. 'Oceana'  0/10

 

Yes interesting. Freshness of seed and viability came home very graphically with your Dypsis leptocheilos but also a number of others including Salacca. I previously ordered seed from RPS of the same and absolutely nothing. A few years later I was in a position to collect fresh fallen fruit of the same and had 99% germination rate. In fact the Salacca I ate, then dropped the seeds in a glass of water where they started germinating within three days, little plugs popped and out came the root.

I think where they excel is in rare endangered species where their mission is to spread seed in order to play some part in conservation because these precious seeds are generaly mostly viable.  For many palm species with notable exceptions viability appears to be quite short lived. The fresher they are at time of sowing the better. I just wonder why they don't say how fresh the seed of each species is. It would help no end in risk management. Maybe if buying in bulk you would have more luck.

Dypsis baronii black petiole also lured me but I've stopped growing palms from seed unless I find fresh fruit on my travels, then Im happy to push a couple into the soft earth when I get home.

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Grasswing
6 hours ago, Rose said:

Yes interesting. Freshness of seed and viability came home very graphically with your Dypsis leptocheilos but also a number of others including Salacca. I previously ordered seed from RPS of the same and absolutely nothing. A few years later I was in a position to collect fresh fallen fruit of the same and had 99% germination rate. In fact the Salacca I ate, then dropped the seeds in a glass of water where they started germinating within three days, little plugs popped and out came the root.

I think where they excel is in rare endangered species where their mission is to spread seed in order to play some part in conservation because these precious seeds are generaly mostly viable.  For many palm species with notable exceptions viability appears to be quite short lived. The fresher they are at time of sowing the better. I just wonder why they don't say how fresh the seed of each species is. It would help no end in risk management. Maybe if buying in bulk you would have more luck.

Dypsis baronii black petiole also lured me but I've stopped growing palms from seed unless I find fresh fruit on my travels, then Im happy to push a couple into the soft earth when I get home.

 

Have you ever had a problem at the airport with palm seeds in your luggage when traveling from a foreign country? I brought seeds with me couple times with no problem so far, but it was between European countries. I wonder if tropical countries have some regulations about exporting seeds which could cause problems.

Thanks!

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Rose
7 hours ago, palmad Merc said:

........ top Areca Vestiaria..........

 

 

The Areca Vestiaria I bought from RPS were pre-germinated and moist, however they were just past their prime as the pointy shoots had turned yellow/brown and turned to mush a day after sowing. Very dissapointing. However I found a mere half a dozen or so fresh fallen fruit in the Singapore botanical gardens which I snapped up. Me or the mice, so I let it be me, besides there were bunches of them, they don't appear to be shy. They all grew beautifully, no problems at all, germinating very quickly. I barely washed them just scrapped a bit of the skin and flesh off with my finger nail. Im thinking in this case the fruit part, or the carps, mesocarp exocarp etc might have acted to preserve them nicely for travel......? They can turn rancid traveling this way, arriving a stinking fermented mess but small amounts work well wrapped in absorbent kitchen towelling and these were fine. Three reds and an orange the rest weren't very colourful, more like brown red even some of the leaves.

I did have very good seed of a few things from RPS, though most of the successful ones have been on the larger and or endangered side and the Phoenix......etc Carpoxylon macrospermum were one hundred percent. 

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Rose
1 hour ago, Grasswing said:

 

Have you ever had a problem at the airport with palm seeds in your luggage when traveling from a foreign country? I brought seeds with me couple times with no problem so far, but it was between European countries. I wonder if tropical countries have some regulations about exporting seeds which could cause problems.

Thanks!

Personally never with palm seed. Australia is very problematic on bringing in, but taking it out as long as you fly direct and dont stop anywhere else in Australia is fine. Even then some things are OK between some territories. But most of the time elsewhere in the world they don't seem too concerned. Some countries appear to be quite strict with taking any wild flora out of their countries without a permit, but they are lax on enforcing or putting this into practise. This is a pity because certain species seed like Cycad and indeed palms are being poached left right and centre. I remember India was quite hit and miss when I loaded my bag last minute with a faggot of about sixty woody hibiscus cuttings. But they decided to let me take them after a bit of heated discourse. I basically had to persuade them they were hibiscus, even nibbling on one at one stage. Just as well I has rinsed them in soap and bottled water. I was quite impressed with those guys as normally Im never even searched!  I wouldn't dream of trying to take anything out that was protected without a permit, palm seed included. 

Edited by Rose
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Grasswing
2 hours ago, Rose said:

Personally never with palm seed. Australia is very problematic on bringing in, but taking it out as long as you fly direct and dont stop anywhere else in Australia is fine. Even then some things are OK between some territories. But most of the time elsewhere in the world they don't seem too concerned. Some countries appear to be quite strict with taking any wild flora out of their countries without a permit, but they are lax on enforcing or putting this into practise. This is a pity because certain species seed like Cycad and indeed palms are being poached left right and centre. I remember India was quite hit and miss when I loaded my bag last minute with a faggot of about sixty woody hibiscus cuttings. But they decided to let me take them after a bit of heated discourse. I basically had to persuade them they were hibiscus, even nibbling on one at one stage. Just as well I has rinsed them in soap and bottled water. I was quite impressed with those guys as normally Im never even searched!  I wouldn't dream of trying to take anything out that was protected without a permit, palm seed included. 

That's interesting. I guess obtaining a permit would be too complicated on a vacation. I've had an idea to send the seeds one wants to bring back home by postal package, but I don't know if they check it too and it costs extra money with less certain outcome.

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palmad Merc

Here is a link to the Australian agriculture palm seed requirements for imports into Australia, you fill in the answer sheet.

There are a few scenario's 

Phytosanitary certificate, commercially packaged, sellers commerial invoice, Ect ect

You don't need all of them, just one of the requirements.

There is also a very long list of permitted palm seed's if click link on the page you open.

 

 

https://bicon.agriculture.gov.au/BiconWeb4.0/ImportConditions/Questions/EvaluateCase?elementID=0000068166&elementVersionID=319

 

Edited by palmad Merc
Spell check

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Mostapha

Well I myself searched for Caryota gigas ( obtussa) seeds to no avail, then I was told to check RPS that they were listing new. I ordered along with other seeds a few months ago. My card still has not been charged. 

So, in essence, I am STILL looking for the C. Obtussa. Sooner or later I will find them and freshness won't be a problem. Thanks Mark

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palmad Merc

My credit card has been charged, I would presume they are being processed and are on their way.:yay:

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palmad Merc

Waiting for conformation that they've been sent and tracking number.

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palmad Merc

3 weeks from order date, waiting for confirmation that they've been sent with tracking number.

 

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palmad Merc

Delivered on the 23rd June, in transit.

So 23 days from date of purchase to send

 That's with phyto certificate, that's why the delay. Rather delay there than delay  here in customs.

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palmad Merc

I've received the seed's.

One month from order placement 

So not bad, considering how busy they are and phytosanitary certificate in place.

They look pretty fresh

Got 215 in the end, which is great.

I'm now soaking them in a solution of warm water and 5 ml of nitrozyme.

I couple floaters but they feel solid.

I'll be placing a post on the main forum page for germination of these seed's.

PhotoGridLite_1530511839471.jpg

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SoulofthePlace
On 08/06/2018, 00:46:39, Rose said:

Yes interesting. Freshness of seed and viability came home very graphically with your Dypsis leptocheilos but also a number of others including Salacca. I previously ordered seed from RPS of the same and absolutely nothing. A few years later I was in a position to collect fresh fallen fruit of the same and had 99% germination rate. In fact the Salacca I ate, then dropped the seeds in a glass of water where they started germinating within three days, little plugs popped and out came the root.

I think where they excel is in rare endangered species where their mission is to spread seed in order to play some part in conservation because these precious seeds are generaly mostly viable.  For many palm species with notable exceptions viability appears to be quite short lived. The fresher they are at time of sowing the better. I just wonder why they don't say how fresh the seed of each species is. It would help no end in risk management. Maybe if buying in bulk you would have more luck.

Dypsis baronii black petiole also lured me but I've stopped growing palms from seed unless I find fresh fruit on my travels, then Im happy to push a couple into the soft earth when I get home.

I've been germinating RPS seeds for months and years and many species just nothing or a very low germination rate. For example: Bismarckia out of 65 seeds 3 germinated. Normally should be at least 50% rate. All kinds of other palms, including many easy-to-germinate ones, after 4 months not a a single germination on most purchased as "fresh" seeds. Although Pritchardia pacifica germinated 6 out of 20 and Latania loddigesii 6 out of 10 and those are exceptions. My card gets charged about a month after I place an order with RPS and then after another month the seeds arrive, so even fresh seeds after 2 such months may become old. Started buying mostly germinated seeds now.

Edited by SoulofthePlace

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