Unbelievable, Fruiting Coconut Palm in Southern California!

41 posts in this topic

:floor:

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you got me! I should have known better. well played.

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Not nice at all...

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38 minutes ago, quaman58 said:

Look at these Rhopies, they are beautiful palms. Better looking than any Coconut in my opinion. They don't like Florida and I don't plant them so they can die of a slow agonizing death. You guys out in California can. But instead, the Coconut palm obsession and torture continues. That is not nice to the Coconut palms. :mrlooney:

20170117_181051_zpsig2y66o5.thumb.JPG.aa

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Well played!

:floor:

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Yeah, except I seem to kill all my Rhopies at about the 10 year mark; just before they start trunking. You're going to have to think up another example..

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44 minutes ago, Moose said:

20170117_181051_zpsig2y66o5.thumb.JPG.aa

This is why there’s an obsession. Nothing silhouettes like a coco.  I took this shot in Hawaii. 

 

7DC1B39F-7099-443D-BF65-4E7FC0377DE3.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Stevetoad said:

This is why there’s an obsession. Nothing silhouettes like a coco.  I took this shot in Hawaii. 

 

7DC1B39F-7099-443D-BF65-4E7FC0377DE3.jpeg

That is the entire point, not in California. Hell I would rip out half my garden and plant Jubaea if I could get them to grow here. First time I ever saw a picture I wanted one.

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Posted (edited)

I've killed a Jubaea that I bought online. I kept it potted. It lived or a few months, then went belly up as soon as the rains and humidity arrived with the heat of late Spring.

Don't even ask me about the Madrone attempt, or Xanthorrhoea, for that matter!

Edited by hbernstein
grammar
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1 hour ago, Moose said:

That is the entire point, not in California. Hell I would rip out half my garden and plant Jubaea if I could get them to grow here. First time I ever saw a picture I wanted one.

I think it is the fact that most of us saw these beautiful swaying cocos while on vacation, and the thought of growing one would take us back there. BUT as I personally know, growing a half dead, ratty coco does not transport you back to the tropics. I now stick with beccariophoenix and parajubea.

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Posted (edited)

5 hours ago, Stevetoad said:

I think it is the fact that most of us saw these beautiful swaying cocos while on vacation, and the thought of growing one would take us back there. BUT as I personally know, growing a half dead, ratty coco does not transport you back to the tropics. I now stick with beccariophoenix and parajubea.

Beccariophoenix - excellent choice. Beautiful lush full palm that resembles a coconut!

Rather than some beat up struggling crackhead looking true Coconut palm.

Parajubaea. - another full beautiful palm that don't stand a chance in my neck of the woods.

Edited by Moose
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12 hours ago, Moose said:

Beccariophoenix - excellent choice. Beautiful lush full palm that resembles a coconut!

Rather than some beat up struggling crackhead looking true Coconut palm.

Parajubaea. - another full beautiful palm that don't stand a chance in my neck of the woods.

agreed. I lost a 20ft parajubea last summer. We had a lot of humid days which might have done it in. Or it might have just up and died which they do sometimes. 

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On ‎5‎/‎16‎/‎2018‎ ‎12‎:‎02‎:‎07‎, Stevetoad said:

This is why there’s an obsession. Nothing silhouettes like a coco.  I took this shot in Hawaii. 

 

7DC1B39F-7099-443D-BF65-4E7FC0377DE3.jpeg

Well said! There really is NO SUBSTITUTE for the Coconut Palm!  It is the epitome of the Tropics!

John

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On ‎5‎/‎16‎/‎2018‎ ‎10‎:‎31‎:‎07‎, quaman58 said:

Not nice at all...

I agree!!!

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Well done sir!

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I don't get the appeal. (HA!) Maypans planted as 25 gallon specimens 21 years ago in Cooper City Florida

Screenshot_20180518-051300.jpg

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One of my Archontophoenix cunninghamiana is trying to identify as a coconut. :)IMG_7538.thumb.JPG.615df1d7cdec26793a2d7IMG_7544.thumb.JPG.03c06cf978d0a4e1a69cb

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1 hour ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

One of my Archontophoenix cunninghamiana is trying to identify as a coconut. :)IMG_7538.thumb.JPG.615df1d7cdec26793a2d7IMG_7544.thumb.JPG.03c06cf978d0a4e1a69cb

Excellent - beautiful palms that give the illustrious tropical feel. A ratty zone pushed Coconut detracts not enhances. You got the humidity, but not enough heat.

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8 hours ago, Moose said:

Excellent - beautiful palms that give the illustrious tropical feel. A ratty zone pushed Coconut detracts not enhances. You got the humidity, but not enough heat.

Not even a ratty zone pushed coconut can grow up here...except maybe in a hot, tall greenhouse. 

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32 minutes ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

Not even a ratty zone pushed coconut can grow up here...except maybe in a hot, tall greenhouse. 

Well Jim, (and Moose) you may be in for a surprise.

20180519_124527.jpg

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1 hour ago, GottmitAlex said:

Well Jim, (and Moose) you may be in for a surprise.

20180519_124527.jpg

If you were in Florida, you would be told that you planted your Coconuts in an area that is not wide enough for your bole. Plus they are planted too close together as they would shade one another out. Coconuts are full sun, not an understory or emergent palm. Since getting large will not be a problem, where they are planted is just fine.

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On 5/16/2018, 7:29:08, Moose said:

:floor:

:floor:

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Posted (edited)

7 hours ago, Moose said:

If you were in Florida, you would be told that you planted your Coconuts in an area that is not wide enough for your bole. Plus they are planted too close together as they would shade one another out. Coconuts are full sun, not an understory or emergent palm. Since getting large will not be a problem, where they are planted is just fine.

If their bole is 2.8 ft. Wide, then I'm good to go! Regards.

20180519_214716.jpg

Edited by GottmitAlex
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10 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Well Jim, (and Moose) you may be in for a surprise.

20180519_124527.jpg

Alex, notice I said "up here." Los Altos is in the southern part of the SF Bay Area and WAY too cool for coconuts even in the summer. Good luck with yours. If yours look decent after a typical winter where you are, they may have a chance at advancing in size some. In a few years, my Beccariophoenix and Jubaeopsis will give my yard some cocos look. My four Parajubaea, at 17 years old are doing that already albeit with hairier trunks. 

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24 minutes ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

Alex, notice I said "up here." Los Altos is in the southern part of the SF Bay Area and WAY too cool for coconuts even in the summer. Good luck with yours. If yours look decent after a typical winter where you are, they may have a chance at advancing in size some. In a few years, my Beccariophoenix and Jubaeopsis will give my yard some cocos look. My four Parajubaea, at 17 years old are doing that already albeit with hairier trunks. 

Ditto Jim.

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Posted (edited)

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Posted (edited)

20180519_125829-1494x2656.thumb.jpg.2af5

48 minutes ago, Pando said:

They jest and laugh... But the jokes on them....

Edited by GottmitAlex
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On ‎5‎/‎19‎/‎2018‎ ‎2‎:‎47‎:‎11‎, GottmitAlex said:

Well Jim, (and Moose) you may be in for a surprise.

20180519_124527.jpg

You tell them, Alex!

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36 minutes ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

You tell them, Alex!

 

Thanks John. Bobbin' and weavin' tryin' to get these cocos to grow!

Edited by GottmitAlex
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4 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

 

Thanks John. Bobbin' and weavin' here!

You're welcome, Alex!  I like the clip, that's a good one!!!

John

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On 5/19/2018, 2:00:38, Moose said:

If you were in Florida, you would be told that you planted your Coconuts in an area that is not wide enough for your bole. Plus they are planted too close together as they would shade one another out. Coconuts are full sun, not an understory or emergent palm. Since getting large will not be a problem, where they are planted is just fine.

One other thing, due to my circumstances, specifically, my region, I do not have the luxury to "space out" cocos nucifera. It's more of a survival of the fittest situation. If one out of the five makes it through, I am good to go. Now if two or more make it, then I'll happily tackle the "overlapping" leaf problem. If you look at DD's palm jungle in La Habra, the "overlapping/understory" issue does not phase his palms at all. 

But, yes. I'm pushing it in a Socal 10b.

Btw, I even have a couple of Dypsis plumosa in between two palms. Compliments of Dooms Dave. 

Those things are growing like weeds from seed. If I didn't know any better, I'd say they could be naturalized in this region.  Bullet proof.

Edited by GottmitAlex
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I still don't fully understand why there are no coconut palms in Southern Califirnia (the really southern parts, LA and south) along the coast. According to the USDA Interactive Zone Map the whole area is pretty much 10a - 10b with little areas here and there that have a zone 11a rating. You would think that in the warmest parts there would be mature coconuts. The only one that I am seeing on this forum that is thriving in California is the one in front of that guys house, which I believe is in an area rated zone 9b. Yes, I know zones are not everything, so I am wondering exactly what it is that keeps these coconuts from growing. 

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2 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

I still don't fully understand why there are no coconut palms in Southern Califirnia (the really southern parts, LA and south) along the coast. According to the USDA Interactive Zone Map the whole area is pretty much 10a - 10b with little areas here and there that have a zone 11a rating. You would think that in the warmest parts there would be mature coconuts. The only one that I am seeing on this forum that is thriving in California is the one in front of that guys house, which I believe is in an area rated zone 9b. Yes, I know zones are not everything, so I am wondering exactly what it is that keeps these coconuts from growing. 

Well said. And yes, the unprotected Corona 9b coco.. the sweet irony. 

Until now, the only thing I have read which keeps cocos from growing in Socal zone 10, are the antagonistic folks "reminding" us all that cocos cannot grow in Socal.

As you aptly noted, the Corona ( freezing and snowy, 9b) coco is living proof of the opposite of the hearsay/myth. Those pontificating statements will give anyone a downer. And hence influence  folks to grow something instead of a coco or another tropical palm. I.e. bottle, dunno, A. merillii..... et al

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So basically a coconut probably died in these warm areas from lack of rain or some other reason, or maybe got a bit of burn from a bad winter, therefore people say they can't be grown there... Anyone (I know you do) who lives in these areas please try growing them. If I lived there I would grow as many varieties as I could. Enough with the myth! :greenthumb:

Edited by PalmTreeDude
Typos
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1 minute ago, PalmTreeDude said:

So basically a coconut probably died in these warm areas from lack of rain or some other reason, or maybe got a bit of burn from a bad winter, therefore people say they cant ne grown... Anyone (I know you do) who lives in these areas please try growing them. If I lived there I would grow as many varieties as I can. Enough with the myth! :greenthumb:

Jawohl! Hear, hear!

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The reason they do not grow well in Southern California is the cool wet winters. They do not like being cold and wet. They do well in cooler areas in Florida because we have dry winters and our wet season is in the warm summer months.

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8 minutes ago, Palmaceae said:

The reason they do not grow well in Southern California is the cool wet winters. They do not like being cold and wet. They do well in cooler areas in Florida because we have dry winters and our wet season is in the warm summer months.

Well a way to mitigate the cold, wet winters and consequently rotting roots, is 3 ft. Of sand. 3x3x3 ft.

Specifically 2.5ft of coarse sand with 1/2 a foot of lava sand (acme brand/amazon) as top dressing.

South facing, etc etc....

And the last factor: INLAND. not beach side. Too many cloudy and cool days seaside. Inland : more direct sunlight.

Hope this helps and serves as a template.

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What kills cocos in California is, as stated above, extended cool and wet conditions. We can debate this topic until Christ returns or we can acknowledge that some cocos have, and do, survive and fruit in southern California. (Interior deserts and Riverside. Doesn't someone here grow one in Tempe, AZ?) I say grow and let grow :winkie:

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I can't explain the corona coconut, I can speculate why and here is my 2 cents. The coco is really glued to the wall of a house that probably retains a lot of heat. If people have been living there during the winter, chances are, they use heaters and the house is kept warm,  that might help very slightly considering the distance the coco is from the wall and from the garage door which is not "sealed". The cocos has its main root ball below the bricks, whether that helps or not I am not sure, but it is something worth considering against rain and the possibility of heat retention near the root zone. This zone is very dry so add that as well in helping the coco to avoid cold feet during winter.This coco might have great genetics, or the winters have not been typical of a zone 9b since the coco was planted. Finally, maybe cocos are not as weak against cool winters as described, having said that, from my observation, I doubt the coco would still be alive in the open.

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