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Do Florida Grown Palms Do Well In The Carolinas?

13 posts in this topic

Since a lot of palms are grown in Florida and shipped up north, do palms grown in Florida do well in the Carolinas? For example, if a palm (let's say Butia, that has experience nothing below 30 degrees F) is shipped from Florida to somewhere like Myrtle Beach, will it end up burning in the winters? 

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Excellent post. Do my windmills do the same? Or should locally grown always be best

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I never had a problem with Florida grown palms when I lived in Myrtle Beach. In fact I had a queen survive two winters at one point. 

 

Some say the blue pot palms aren’t as hardy because of synthetic hormones and fertilizers. I never have an issue though. 

Edited by Brad Mondel
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I have a few young palmettos in ground from Florida, and even a few potted ones that I have not put in ground yet, that all pulled through this past winter just fine. I prefer finding local palms or growing them though. I think one of my larger in ground Butias might be from Florida too.

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I know its outside of the scope, but my big box Florida grown palms seem to do well here. To be honest all my palms do well under the circumstances so long as I dont use a pure potting soil while waiting for plantation time lol. 

Edited by mdsonofthesouth
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On 5/12/2018, 8:10:32, PalmTreeDude said:

Since a lot of palms are grown in Florida and shipped up north, do palms grown in Florida do well in the Carolinas? For example, if a palm (let's say Butia, that has experience nothing below 30 degrees F) is shipped from Florida to somewhere like Myrtle Beach, will it end up burning in the winters? 

The tree service came through a couple weeks ago and decapitated every palm in the neighborhood growing along the main drive - butia and sabal.  Most of the butia's had significant damage, and most of the sabals had unsightly lower frond damage, so I guess they just wanted to start all over again.  Most of the sabals are pushing out new growth, but some are not.  It is likely a handful of them died.  From what I've seen, the cold event looks to have killed 10-15% of the Florida sabal palmetto's.  I can't speak to how long they have been established for, but it is very clear to me that the imported sabal palmettos are not up to snuff with those that grow natively on Bald Head Island and Oak Island.

 

I am only about 40 mins from the SC border and very close to the ocean, and that past January was a nightmare.  We had thick freezing rain, followed by 4 inches of snow.  We had 5 nights in a row that had absolute minimums between 8-14 degrees, and I don't think the days ever broke 40.  The ground froze here for the first time in decades and blew up my and my neighbor's irrigation lines.  I was told it was the coldest temps recorded since 1917.  I believe it.  It was brutal.  It was like I never left Philadelphia for that 2 week period.  Like I said, despite those horrific conditions, ~90% of the Florida sabals will make it.  Virtually every palm had some yellowing or browning somewhere so they need a nice pruning.  I even had to prune my trachy's.  Even my oregano burned and I had to cut it back some.

Edited by Anthony_B
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On 5/23/2018, 11:50:42, Anthony_B said:

The tree service came through a couple weeks ago and decapitated every palm in the neighborhood growing along the main drive - butia and sabal.  Most of the butia's had significant damage, and most of the sabals had unsightly lower frond damage, so I guess they just wanted to start all over again.  Most of the sabals are pushing out new growth, but some are not.  It is likely a handful of them died.  From what I've seen, the cold event looks to have killed 10-15% of the Florida sabal palmetto's.  I can't speak to how long they have been established for, but it is very clear to me that the imported sabal palmettos are not up to snuff with those that grow natively on Bald Head Island and Oak Island.

 

I am only about 40 mins from the SC border and very close to the ocean, and that past January was a nightmare.  We had thick freezing rain, followed by 4 inches of snow.  We had 5 nights in a row that had absolute minimums between 8-14 degrees, and I don't think the days ever broke 40.  The ground froze here for the first time in decades and blew up my and my neighbor's irrigation lines.  I was told it was the coldest temps recorded since 1917.  I believe it.  It was brutal.  It was like I never left Philadelphia for that 2 week period.  Like I said, despite those horrific conditions, ~90% of the Florida sabals will make it.  Virtually every palm had some yellowing or browning somewhere so they need a nice pruning.  I even had to prune my trachy's.  Even my oregano burned and I had to cut it back some.

Dang. They said it was the longest period in Richmond here below freezing. 

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I would think its more of a DNA thing, than where the palms were grown. Planting them early in spring and giving them a good growing season to get acclimated is important as well.

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On 5/25/2018, 6:10:48, PalmTreeDude said:

Dang. They said it was the longest period in Richmond here below freezing. 

 

Yeah same here! Im not sure on the exact number of hours but Im pretty sure it was ALOT!

 

13 hours ago, frienduvafrond said:

I would think its more of a DNA thing, than where the palms were grown. Planting them early in spring and giving them a good growing season to get acclimated is important as well.

 

I think youre right on the DNA. All but 2 of my palms were grown in Miami before coming here and they all seem to do very well here. The only issue I have is that I have a good mess of palms ready for plantation but I have to wait to plant them til the addition is done and thats looking to be late July through August. There are 2 problems one being that it is later in the growing season and the other is it will be extremely hot and humid. Now I might get a break when they get the walls up and might be able plant sooner, but I doubt that. I did plant my chamaerops humlis in September 2016 and despite seeing 15F that winter it only burned on the tips. 

 

Honestly I am on the fence as to planting them later in the season or holding them in the garage. Problem is they arent small and space in my shop is at a premium. Also I worry about the garage storage as the combo of that and potting soil is what almost killed my chamaerops cerifera. Granted I dont use pure potting soil anymore, but I have good money invested so maybe Ill just gamble on the late planting.

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9 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

Yeah same here! Im not sure on the exact number of hours but Im pretty sure it was ALOT!

 

 

I think youre right on the DNA. All but 2 of my palms were grown in Miami before coming here and they all seem to do very well here. The only issue I have is that I have a good mess of palms ready for plantation but I have to wait to plant them til the addition is done and thats looking to be late July through August. There are 2 problems one being that it is later in the growing season and the other is it will be extremely hot and humid. Now I might get a break when they get the walls up and might be able plant sooner, but I doubt that. I did plant my chamaerops humlis in September 2016 and despite seeing 15F that winter it only burned on the tips. 

 

Honestly I am on the fence as to planting them later in the season or holding them in the garage. Problem is they arent small and space in my shop is at a premium. Also I worry about the garage storage as the combo of that and potting soil is what almost killed my chamaerops cerifera. Granted I dont use pure potting soil anymore, but I have good money invested so maybe Ill just gamble on the late planting.

That is a hard decision on waiting to plant next year or this one. Part of the acclimation aside from root development , is just the hardening off leading into winter. That can be achieved just by leaving them out in the pots.

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4 hours ago, frienduvafrond said:

That is a hard decision on waiting to plant next year or this one. Part of the acclimation aside from root development , is just the hardening off leading into winter. That can be achieved just by leaving them out in the pots.

 

I leave the pots out til mid to late december sometimes later. But I might just take my chances like I did with the chamaerops and plant them late. The thought of seeing these awesome specimens going through what my cerifera went through as sadly it will be recovering for a while especially since it put out 2 inflorescence. Also I am thinking we are due for a normal mild winter which won't hurt anything in the garden.

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25 minutes ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

I leave the pots out til mid to late december sometimes later. But I might just take my chances like I did with the chamaerops and plant them late. The thought of seeing these awesome specimens going through what my cerifera went through as sadly it will be recovering for a while especially since it put out 2 inflorescence. Also I am thinking we are due for a normal mild winter which won't hurt anything in the garden.

I would just leave it in the pot and then bring it in on the coldest nights so it gets acclimated to the cold and it won't be the first time seeing such low temps.I am doing that with all my palms even though they are from Texas coldhardy and I know they have seen cold temps.But,just to be safe I will leave them in pots and plant early next spring.

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I just REALLY HATE potted plants. Pain in the butt weird watering requirements and they dont do that well in the garage. But the new garage will have a window so I guess we will see. I did plant my first palm in september and it did extremely well in a typical winter.

 

I will make a judgement call when I am allowed to plant per the builders and when they are ready. Would be hard to wait til march 2019 lol.

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