My red Tahiti dwarf/Haari Papua cocos finally arrived

72 posts in this topic

Hello Meg,

Yes you are right but perhaps the water is good tasting and I heard it can produce many nuts when properly fed, in any case it is a very beautiful coconut, Lipstick palms don't even come with coconuts:). It reminds me of that story User00 told us about the "stupid coconut" as people called it, the coconut looked amazing to me:)

 

 

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30 minutes ago, Cluster said:

Hello Meg,

Yes you are right but perhaps the water is good tasting and I heard it can produce many nuts when properly fed, in any case it is a very beautiful coconut, Lipstick palms don't even come with coconuts:). It reminds me of that story User00 told us about the "stupid coconut" as people called it, the coconut looked amazing to me:)

 

 

I can attest to the fact the "Kings candy" or "coconut sprout" within the nut is super sweet.  My second red Tahiti dwarf coco, was not growing any.  As you can see from the photos, its leaves were corrugated and last week, they began to orange out... so I opened it up, and sure enough, there was a milliped-looking worm inside eating the roots.  The roots were browned out. However, the "coconut candy" within the nut was intact. I told my family: this is the most expensive kings candy we will ever have. So, enjoy. Everyone picked up a spoon and dipped. So sweet. Not salty as the pacifics we have had.  Honestly, it was top shelf, gourmet quality sprout. 

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Hey Alex,

That is the kind of info I like to hear, such valuable information. For some reason a feeling I have, there is more to this variety than meets the eye. Sure it might not produce very big nuts, but it might make up with the gourmet taste and even if that does not add up it is very good looking, I am glad it is top quality thus far though. Sometimes what is discarded in an era is loved in the next one, dwarf coconuts used to be very secondary, these days they are becoming more and more famous as mankind is learning how to tap them.

If you do get small coconuts out of this one in the future it will be nice to gauge the water quality:), just remember to pick them around 7 months for better taste and good water quantity.

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21 hours ago, Cluster said:

Hey Alex,

That is the kind of info I like to hear, such valuable information. For some reason a feeling I have, there is more to this variety than meets the eye. Sure it might not produce very big nuts, but it might make up with the gourmet taste and even if that does not add up it is very good looking, I am glad it is top quality thus far though. Sometimes what is discarded in an era is loved in the next one, dwarf coconuts used to be very secondary, these days they are becoming more and more famous as mankind is learning how to tap them.

If you do get small coconuts out of this one in the future it will be nice to gauge the water quality:), just remember to pick them around 7 months for better taste and good water quantity.

Will do. If it grows and if it produces fruit, I will harvest and sample one at that time.  I am looking forward to getting this little red guy to grow.  Kinda late now, but looking back, I wish my three talls would have been dwarfs as are my two dwarfs ( my original golden Malayan and  the new red haari Papua)

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Just got my RED TAHITI RANGIROA fresh from Hawaii! Very happy to get this one as I could not move my Dwarf Fiji to my new garden as it was too big for me to handle. 

So with Meg's there is 2 in Cape Coral!

 

20180526_135418.jpg

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Nice one! Mine hasn't been growing terribly fast so I hope it is concentrating on its root system.

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On ‎4‎/‎6‎/‎2018‎ ‎11‎:‎03‎:‎08‎, Panamajack said:

I'm in Palos Verdes, about 2 blocks from the Pacific. I'm currently trying with a Pacific Tall. Good luck! 

Carl,

Post some pics of your Panama Tall for us!

John

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On ‎4‎/‎23‎/‎2018‎ ‎4‎:‎21‎:‎39‎, GottmitAlex said:

If you can acquire them, look for the one with the widest (thickest) sprout. Those, in my opinion, have better survivability chances than the thinner necked seedlings.

Alex,

I think you may be on to something there.  I think the ones with the thickest sprout are more robust overall and probably tougher than thinner ones of the same variety.

John

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11 hours ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Nice one! Mine hasn't been growing terribly fast so I hope it is concentrating on its root system.

Meg, has the spear grown at all?

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On ‎5‎/‎1‎/‎2018‎ ‎6‎:‎34‎:‎49‎, Zeeth said:

Here's a pic of my palm before the winter damage. It's still alive now but not as pretty. It's about 5.5 years from seed (give or take).

IMG_0293.thumb.JPG.2a4cfc326763bdf9e6995

Absolutely BEAUTIFUL!!!

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Here's an update. One month after. Give or take...

You can see the spear growing on pic #1

20180528_213224-2241x3984.jpg

20180528_213243-2241x3984.jpg

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12 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

Here's an update. One month after. Give or take...

You can see the spear growing on pic #1

20180528_213224-2241x3984.jpg

20180528_213243-2241x3984.jpg

Alex,

Where did you get yours from?  What did they cost you?

John

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Posted (edited)

18 minutes ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Alex,

Where did you get yours from?  What did they cost you?

John

Hi John. Ebay. Cost about 50 bucks each with shipping.  As I said, one of them turned out to be the most expensive "kings candy" we have ever sampled. Honestly, it was worth it. Sweet and not salty as other coco sprouts we have tasted. The rangoroa is the real deal. 

Alex

Eta: this is the seller. Contact him for the thickest/widest stem. That's what I did for my two.

https://m.ebay.com/itm/RED-TAHITI-RANGIROA-Dwarf-COCONUT-Cocos-nucifera-RARE-SPROUTED-SEED/361546459452?hash=item542dd9293c:g:7sUAAOSwZSFXJWR-

 

Edited by GottmitAlex
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5 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

Hi John. Ebay. Cost about 50 bucks each with shipping.  As I said, one of them turned out to be the most expensive "kings candy" we have ever sampled. Honestly, it was worth it. Sweet and not salty as other coco sprouts we have tasted. The rangoroa is the real deal. 

Alex

 

Alex,

Sounds good, but I couldn't bear to tear one open to eat it, since I love growing them so much!  When I have some extra money, I might try getting one of these.  I sure wish I lived in Brownsville instead of Corpus Christi, because there I could try several different varieties of Coconut Palms with a lot better chance of them making it through the winter and growing to maturity with nuts on them than here.

John

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Posted (edited)

19 minutes ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Alex,

Sounds good, but I couldn't bear to tear one open to eat it, since I love growing them so much!  When I have some extra money, I might try getting one of these.  I sure wish I lived in Brownsville instead of Corpus Christi, because there I could try several different varieties of Coconut Palms with a lot better chance of them making it through the winter and growing to maturity with nuts on them than here.

John

John.

I get it. Lol.  Believe me, I will not tear open a sprout in my neck of the wood unless it merits it. I posted this several messages back. But the short of it is: the second sprout (which was in a pot), since I received it had "corrugated" leaves. If you look at the first post you can see it. Didn't think much of it at the time. But three weeks went by,  and no growth..... while the one which was planted in the garden showed signs of growth and didn't present "corrugated" leaves. By this time, I told myself "Alex, something is wrong with rangoroa #2" I opened it and sure enough, there was a milliped-looking worm eating at the roots.(they were dark brown) I thought to myself, ok, "I'll discard it. " however after killing the milliped-worm. I opened the nut and it was intact gorgeous. Pure white with a bit of peach. That's when I brought and presented it to the fam. By this time, we all knew what a coco sprout/kings candy/coco apple looks like, we all satisfied our taste. It was the best we have ever, ever had. 

I attached a pic of Haari Papua/Rangiroa #2. Notice the leaves.....

2016 rocked our world.*I delved into coco nucifera in Socal.

 

Alex

20180331_105955.jpg

Edited by GottmitAlex
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8 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

John.

I get it. Lol.  Believe me, I will not tear open a sprout in my neck of the wood unless it merits it. I posted this several messages back. But the short of it is: the second sprout (which was in a pot), since I received it had "corrugated" leaves. If you look at the first post you can see it. Didn't think much of it at the time. But three weeks went by,  and no growth..... while the one which was planted in the garden showed signs of growth and didn't present "corrugated" leaves. By this time, I told myself "Alex, something is wrong with rangoroa #2" I opened it and sure enough, there was a milliped-looking worm eating at the roots.(they were dark brown) I thought to myself, ok, "I'll discard it. " however after killing the milliped-worm. I opened the nut and it was intact gorgeous. Pure white with a bit of peach. That's when I brought and presented it to the fam. By this time, we all knew what a coco sprout/kings candy/coco apple looks like, we all satisfied our taste. It was the best we have ever, ever had. 

I attached a pic of Haari Papua/Rangiroa #2. Notice the leaves.....

2016 rocked our world.*I delved into coco nucifera in Socal.

 

Alex

20180331_105955.jpg

Alex,

The worm issue and brown roots sounds bad, but I have had sprouts that have the corrugated wrinkled leaves before, but they snap out of it by about the 3rd  or 4th leaf.  I think it is sprouts that struggle more to punch through the husk, but usually recover afterwards.

John

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20180602_014736.jpg

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They look very nice, I love the orangey petioles on the malayan. And you say you put salt on the surface? Keeps slugs away I suppose...;)

Re the pics being on their side. Turn off 'Auto rotate' in your phone or camera's settings.

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Posted (edited)

6 hours ago, Howeadypsis said:

They look very nice, I love the orangey petioles on the malayan. And you say you put salt on the surface? Keeps slugs away I suppose...;)

Re the pics being on their side. Turn off 'Auto rotate' in your phone or camera's settings.

Cocos love sodium chloride.

They grow faster with it and according to the mass coco growers, they produce more fruit than the ones without.

There's a paper about the subject. I'll look for it. But yes, day and night difference.

Here are the links:

http://agris.fao.org/agris-search/search.do?recordID=PH8911757

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.pca.da.gov.ph/pdf/techno/salt.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjJsbWku7XbAhVCIKwKHYEdCgoQFjACegQIBhAB&usg=AOvVaw1sej5LMBn3pcTyu6RUDN3x

Edited by GottmitAlex
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I put 5 litres of seawater on my malay dwarf every couple of weeks it certainly hasn't hurt the palm. There are thousands of coconuts growing wild along the beaches further north in our state and they only stop growing around the high tide mark, seawater doesn't seem to cause them any grief at all. I've also read of commercial growers adding salt as Alex mentioned so there must be something to it. I decided to use seawater based on the fact that they seem to grow all along the coast so they must get some benefit from that environment. They are fun to play around with!

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19 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Cocos love sodium chloride.

They grow faster with it and according to the mass coco growers, they produce more fruit than the ones without.

There's a paper about the subject. I'll look for it. But yes, day and night difference.

Here are the links:

http://agris.fao.org/agris-search/search.do?recordID=PH8911757

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.pca.da.gov.ph/pdf/techno/salt.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjJsbWku7XbAhVCIKwKHYEdCgoQFjACegQIBhAB&usg=AOvVaw1sej5LMBn3pcTyu6RUDN3x

Thats quite remarkable!

"The most economical rate of 1.76 kg NaCl/tree per year resulted in 36.6% increase in nuts, 44.8% increase in copra/nut and 96.7% increase in copra/tree"

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I couldn't resist and got one as well :drool:
What a beautiful little thing! 

IMG_1557 (1).jpg

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Hardly noticeable :lol:

IMG_1558.jpg

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It's noticeable enough, I want one too!

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Update: It's growing extremely well for my region. It took 108F on Saturday without any issues. 101-99F the following days. 

20180701_122515.thumb.jpg.53cbfa79a4e67d20180701_122611.thumb.jpg.31eb165eaa662c

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Looking great Alex!

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On 5/27/2018, 2:40:38, GottmitAlex said:

Meg, has the spear grown at all?

Yes, finally. I think it had a problem with the initial growing point but it produced a second one, which is taking off. It just needed time. I'll take photos when I can.

Yours is looking good.

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I want mine to look like yours :greenthumb: already :mrlooney:

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Early this morning I was able to limp outside with my camera to take photos of my Cocos nucifera Red Tahiti Rangirora, which is finally taking off now it has sprouted a new growing point in our summer heat, rain and humidity.

5b467df85c1cc_CocosnuciferaRedTahitiRang5b467e0963980_CocosnuciferaRedTahitiRang5b467e1d7736a_CocosnuciferaRedTahitiRang5b467e3bef0ee_CocosnuciferaRedTahitiRang

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My Red Tahiti is doing very well also.

 

20180711_182338.jpg

20180711_182347.jpg

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They're looking fantastic, everyone!

If there is a fast growing palm out there, it is the cocos nucifera.

:greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:

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Everyone has one except me! I've got to track one down here in W.A. they're such nice looking coconuts.

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