My red Tahiti dwarf/Haari Papua cocos finally arrived

86 posts in this topic

They arrived. I am very enthusiastic about these two. The main reason is their thickness of both their stems. Reminiscent of my first and most thriving coco: golden malayan dwarf. It also had a very wide neck. My other green malayan dwarf (rip) was tall, but very thin in stemwise.  

So I planted one of the new Red Tahiti/ Haari Papua dwarves in the place where my previous (and only) Atlantic tall perished. The plot had already one week of liquid copper drained it it. I replaced a foot of soil anyway with lava sand. 

The other Red Tahiti dwarf I potted up and is in "black magic" potting soil. I will place it beneath the golden malayan dwarf,  so it will have shade all day. And whatever sunlight seeps in between the golden malayan dwarfs' leaflets. 

I'm taking this gamble as opposed to babying them for a year. My Golden Malayan dwarf was a tad bit younger (not by much though) when I took the plunge and planted it in the place where it's thriving.  Here again, I do believe stem thickness (girth) is more important than height in regards with cocos.

 

Well, enough pontificating, here are the pictures:

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Just for reference, here are today's pics of the Golden Malayan dwarf. 1.5 years in the ground. Planted August 30th, 2016 as a one leaf seedling. 

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Also as reference. Here are today's pics of a supermatket-bought, dehusked, Golden Mexican tall coco germinated here in my greenhouse (south facing outhouse bathroom). Germinated Nov 2016, I planted it on March 2017, once it had its first leaf. And it's growing. 

The white stuff on it is the residue from the daconil which I sprayed on it a week and a half ago since it was the closest (distance-wise) coco from the Atlantic tall which rotted to death. I took my precautions. Also the white stuff on the ground top of lava sand is salt. They love it.

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Posted (edited)

Ok, those last series of pics came out sideways. I'll just upload two pics directly here. The golden Mexican tall seedling (germinated in house from a supermarket dehusked coco) and the golden Malayan dwarf. Planted a year and half ago as a single leaf seedling.

 

 

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Edited by GottmitAlex
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Very cool. I like that red Tahiti dwarf.

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Your post got me looking into red dwarf coconuts...saw sprouted red dwarf coconuts on eBay. :drool: Better wait for now. Have enough super tender tropicals. :hmm:

Alex, can you tell me more about this "Black Magic" company? What made you decide to go with their potting soil above others? I had a quick look at their website. I like their packaging! ^_^

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2 hours ago, Missi said:

Your post got me looking into red dwarf coconuts...saw sprouted red dwarf coconuts on eBay. :drool: Better wait for now. Have enough super tender tropicals. :hmm:

Alex, can you tell me more about this "Black Magic" company? What made you decide to go with their potting soil above others? I had a quick look at their website. I like their packaging! ^_^

Last year I walked into a big "home" box store looking for soil to pot up some b. Alfredii which, back then, they were on route to me. So I preparing. I stumbled across black magic "pro peat blend" soil. Expensive stuff for a bag. About 40 bucks worth. I liked the fact that in the packaging it said excellent drainage. Well, once everything was said and done, I think "excellent drainage" was un understatement. It dries out every other day if not, the next day. I admit, I underestimated the soil. It does what it says. Great for indoor, continously hydroponics systems, et al.

I went back (two months later) and checked the other black magic products, now knowing, that what they mention on their label, is the real deal. This time I picked up potting soil. Great drainage and stays moist for days. Love it.  It has a great mix of everything under the sun ingedient-wise and the first 3-4 months it feeds the palms.   Reading the reviews online  post-purchase, I noticed a couple folks saying that the "potting soil" mix was too hot. Not for me Alfredii, two ravanea Hildebrandtii, two by bottle palms, a heck-load of liners with germinated queen palm blades, and now a red Tahiti dwarf seedling. Oh yeah, a mint plant in a 1 gallon as well.

Not to much a scientific answer, but it works for me.

Cheers Missi.

 

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On 4/2/2018, 5:56:11, GottmitAlex said:

Last year I walked into a big "home" box store looking for soil to pot up some b. Alfredii which, back then, they were on route to me. So I preparing. I stumbled across black magic "pro peat blend" soil. Expensive stuff for a bag. About 40 bucks worth. I liked the fact that in the packaging it said excellent drainage. Well, once everything was said and done, I think "excellent drainage" was un understatement. It dries out every other day if not, the next day. I admit, I underestimated the soil. It does what it says. Great for indoor, continously hydroponics systems, et al.

I went back (two months later) and checked the other black magic products, now knowing, that what they mention on their label, is the real deal. This time I picked up potting soil. Great drainage and stays moist for days. Love it.  It has a great mix of everything under the sun ingedient-wise and the first 3-4 months it feeds the palms.   Reading the reviews online  post-purchase, I noticed a couple folks saying that the "potting soil" mix was too hot. Not for me Alfredii, two ravanea Hildebrandtii, two by bottle palms, a heck-load of liners with germinated queen palm blades, and now a red Tahiti dwarf seedling. Oh yeah, a mint plant in a 1 gallon as well.

Not to much a scientific answer, but it works for me.

Cheers Missi.

 

Hey! I'm A-OK with a non-scientific answer! :greenthumb: That's all really good to know! I saw on the Black Magic website, where they say to Buy Online, the link goes directly to a big box store's website and the info says it's currently out of stock. I entered my email to be notified when it becomes available again. I'm going to try it for some of my acid-loving palms! :yay: I know for a fact I've never seen it in my local big box store. Bummer for me!

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Where in CA are you?

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Panamajack said:

Where in CA are you?

 

In CA: San Diego.

My narrow garden is in Mexico: Tijuana, Baja. 6 miles south of San Diego border.

 

Edited by GottmitAlex
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On 4/4/2018, 11:16:27, GottmitAlex said:

 

In CA: San Diego.

My narrow garden is in Mexico: Tijuana, Baja. 6 miles south of San Diego border.

 

I'm in Palos Verdes, about 2 blocks from the Pacific. I'm currently trying with a Pacific Tall. Good luck! 

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2 hours ago, Panamajack said:

I'm in Palos Verdes, about 2 blocks from the Pacific. I'm currently trying with a Pacific Tall. Good luck! 

I wish you also the best of luck. Fortuitously my garden is about twelve miles inland. I am in that warmer sunset zone (Zone 23)  than the one beach side (24). I don't  know first hand, however, from what I have read on the forum is that in our latitude, for folks it has been quite difficult trying to grow coconuts near the beach due to the continuous cooler climate influenced by the pacific. I can relate to that, just this morning I left the house in TJ at 8:00am went to see a client in National city I could tell it was 5F cooler there at 9:00am than it was an hour earlier in the East side of TJ. 

You probably read many of the recommendations on the forum regarding the placement for you coco. South side of the house, good drainage, thermal mass and heat retaining material close by in order for the coconut to have an edge in our region. 

Here again, best of luck Panamajack

 

 

 

 

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Tad bit too soon for any substantial updates. However it has been three weeks now and the red Tahiti dwarf planted in the garden is growing. 

Here's a pic

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I want to try one of those now! I think there is a mob in Queensland that post them just sprouted to Western Australia, I'm going to look into it.

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15 hours ago, sandgroper said:

I want to try one of those now! I think there is a mob in Queensland that post them just sprouted to Western Australia, I'm going to look into it.

If you can acquire them, look for the one with the widest (thickest) sprout. Those, in my opinion, have better survivability chances than the thinner necked seedlings.

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Hello Alex,

That looks like a nice and rare variety at least here on palmtalk. Do you know much about this variety? I did not find many pictures online, nor do I know if their water etc is good when picked at the right time. The only thing I came up with is that they seem to produce many small cocos.

I look forward to hearing news from her;)

 

Regards

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Posted (edited)

29 minutes ago, Cluster said:

Hello Alex,

That looks like a nice and rare variety at least here on palmtalk. Do you know much about this variety? I did not find many pictures online, nor do I know if their water etc is good when picked at the right time. The only thing I came up with is that they seem to produce many small cocos.

I look forward to hearing news from her;)

 

Regards

I guess I know as much as you regarding this species. A semi-dwarf, deep orange color, supposedly one of the most least cold hardy, frailest of the cocos. And yes, produce the least amounts of nuts. The two things which attracted me to it is 1.- It stays dwarf for a long time. Longer than a typical Malayan dwarf.  To me that translates into "I can take protect it longer than other cocos. Enough for it to establish itself and grow the required root system from seedling".

2.- Love the color. As I said on the vid, " I guess deep orange is the new red". Lol seriously, I thought my golden malayan dwarf was colorful being light orange.  This little one is beyond Halloween. orange. Pretty sure folks will do double takes on it.

 

And just as my golden Malaya dwarf, it reminds me of a gooseneck barnacle. (Which I love, btw)

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Edited by GottmitAlex
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Supposedly it also has longer leaflets and that should be quite nice! Good times!

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Posted (edited)

Cheers Cluster!

 

Here's a better overall picture of the red Tahiti dwarf seedling.

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Edited by GottmitAlex
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Sideways... hopefully, the app uploaded it correctly this time:

 

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Posted (edited)

And now that I'm at it, here are the pics of the Golden Malayan Dwarf, the three pacific talls (one Mexican Pacific tall), and the B. Fenestralis. I didnt take a pic of the Alfredii, since, it is growing slower than a Canariensis. (Not kidding). The Haari Papua coco, will grow much faster than the Alfredii, I'll put it that way. The B alfredii is 6 years old. The Papua is a seedling. Months old. Although I love the alfredii, I never expected it to be such a sedate grower. The poor fellow is slower than molasses in winter, in Alaska. 

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Edited by GottmitAlex
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Gee the heat lamps are a nice bright pink!

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, sandgroper said:

Gee the heat lamps are a nice bright pink!

Those are 10 watt LED grow lights. They don't generate heat. The heat/brood lamps are on floor level and are trained/directed 85% soil and 15% stem. Soil Temps rise and produce heat for the coco. 

Notice no heat lamps for the Fenestralis. (Nor the alfredii for that matter) they, in my 10b climate do not require any. They can take 26f no problemo.  Cocos, different story....

Edited by GottmitAlex
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40 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

Those are 10 watt LED grow lights. They don't generate heat. The heat/brood lamps are on floor level and are trained/directed 85% soil and 15% stem. Soil Temps rise and produce heat for the coco. 

Notice no heat lamps for the Fenestralis. (Nor the alfredii for that matter) they, in my 10b climate do not require any. They can take 26f no problemo.  Cocos, different story....

Cheers mate, really interesting to see what is being done by people to grow these things, I’m learning a lot!

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I don't find my Tahiti red dwarf all that cold sensitive. It got a similar amount of damage as my other coconuts at 28˚, but it's regrowing pretty well. I find that the variety is very similar to the Red Spicata Dwarf in petiole color, leaf size/shape, trunk thickness, growth rate and coconut size/shape. The only difference that I've noticed between the two varieties is that the RSD has spicate inflorescences. Dave Romney claims in his coconut book that the TRD is susceptible to Lethal Yellowing, whereas the RSD is resistant, but I have no experience with the disease, so I can't say much about this. I will state that both varieties grow at Fairchild, and the trees have been around since the 1950's despite LY. 

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I really admire the dedication!!

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Posted (edited)

Hello Keith,

Do you have any pictures of the TRD (mature palm if possible)? I have found few things about them, Dr Roland Bourdeix does mention they have long leaflets and there is a picture in his blog. I do not know much about the water and other stuff, though.

The picture in question:

Tahiti%20Red%20dwarf.0.jpg

 

Looks quite cool if yours turns out to be like this Alex^^

 

Edited by Cluster
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15 minutes ago, Cluster said:

Hello Keith,

Do you have any pictures of the TRD (mature palm if possible)? 

The ones at Fairchild are in a difficult to photograph spot because of the surrounding vegetation. Here's the best picture I have:

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Here's a pic of my palm before the winter damage. It's still alive now but not as pretty. It's about 5.5 years from seed (give or take).

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Posted (edited)

3 hours ago, Cluster said:

Hello Keith,

Do you have any pictures of the TRD (mature palm if possible)? I have found few things about them, Dr Roland Bourdeix does mention they have long leaflets and there is a picture in his blog. I do not know much about the water and other stuff, though.

The picture in question:

Tahiti%20Red%20dwarf.0.jpg

 

Looks quite cool if yours turns out to be like this Alex^^

 

The palm looks like a "dwarf" B. fenestralis with those long hanging leaflets.

Nice. they do mention (under optimal conditions) that the RTD does fruit at 4-5 years from germination. Rather than 2-4 years of the malayan dwarfs. (Under optimal conditions).Zeeths picture is right on regarding height: The online document says the RTD's trunk is not a full meter tall even when it's 8 years old (3 years after fruiting, under optimal conditions)....

Thanks Cluster for the added info

 

Edited by GottmitAlex
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Posted (edited)

3 hours ago, Zeeth said:

Here's a pic of my palm before the winter damage. It's still alive now but not as pretty. It's about 5.5 years from seed (give or take).

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Scratch the question.  Beautiful palm Keith!

Edited by GottmitAlex
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Thanks Keith, your TRD looks neat and so does the Fairchild one.

Hope it recovers nicely.

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It's growing at an extraordinary rate.

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BTW, it's 330pm pst just took this pic, Haari Papua in shade...

Aaand 31C

 

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3 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

BTW, it's 330pm pst just took this pic, Haari Papua in shade...

Aaand 31C

 

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31c he'll respond nicely to that!

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I read this topic and decided to bite the bullet for one of these coconuts. It arrived a few days ago with first leaf starting. It's in a pot in full sun and starting to take off. Highs are 90+F now but it's still dry season so I water it every other day or so. I too the following photos a few minutes ago.

Cocos nucifera Red Tahiti Rangiroa, Cape Coral, FL

5af31aa2320f8_CocosnuciferaRedTahitiRang5af31aaf2dfa7_CocosnuciferaRedTahitiRang

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Very nice Meg. Congratulations on the red Tahiti. I am sure it will grow just splendidly in Cape Coral.

 

 

 

 

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Hello Alex,

It is indeed growing decently, it does not even seem to be in shock after the travel:o. Now Meg also has one, you can race each other :floor:, keep us up to date, would love to learn more about this variety myself.

Regards,

Pedro

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11 minutes ago, Cluster said:

Hello Alex,

It is indeed growing decently, it does not even seem to be in shock after the travel:o. Now Meg also has one, you can race each other :floor:, keep us up to date, would love to learn more about this variety myself.

Regards,

Pedro

Pedro, I did some internet research before I bought mine. This variety is very rare partly because it is of little commercial interest, hence few people take time to grow it. The palm itself stays relatively small. The coconuts are quite small and produce little milk or meat compared to common varieties. They also have low germination rates. It's a collector's palm.

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