Some random shots of palms in my jungle!

51 posts in this topic

It's been just over seven years since I bought these two acres in Leilani Estates and began planting palms. The palms have overwhelmingly done very well despite the fact that for the most part they have been forced to fend for themselves against aggressive weeds that will go from inches tall to several feet in just a few months. I walked around yesterday afternoon and snapped some photos of some of the palms that are more accessible, so I'll be posting a bunch here. First, a trio of very attractive mystery Dypsis. The larger Dypsis on the left is an "Orange crush" that's soon about to form a trunk. :)

DSC_0011.JPG

14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can never go wrong with groups of Areca vestiaria!

DSC_0012.JPG

DSC_0016.JPG

19

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Entrance to my Forest Trail #2. Fronds on the left belong to a Calyptrocalyx albertisianus (and about eight more of those further down this trail).

DSC_0013.JPG

12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Euterpe catinga - about eight or nine of those on both sides of Forest Trail #2.

DSC_0014.JPG

DSC_0015.JPG

15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dypsis mananjarensis "mealy bug". Have a few of these and this is the largest one.

DSC_0017.JPG

DSC_0018.JPG

15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two Sabinarias and both have been in the ground since about mid 2016. Compared to Gene's monster Sabinarias in Manila, these are very modest, but despite being slow, they seem to be doing just fine. Three photos here. #1 a close up, for #2 I took a couple of steps back to show the environment it's growing in (=LOTS of weeds that have to be cleared out on a regular basis) and #3, a few more steps back to show even more of the environment and in this photo you can't even see the Sabinaria. But it's there!  :mrlooney:

DSC_0019.JPG

DSC_0020.JPG

DSC_0023.JPG

11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forest Trail #3, and the two Sabinarias are planted right off this trail. A common occurrence here - trees fall down left and right, and one fell down recently and is blocking the trail - at least for wheelbarrow access. Time for the chainsaw... B)

DSC_0022.JPG

8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of many Dypsis prestoniana in the garden. This one was a gift from Matt and Tiffany Rippa, who also live here in Leilani Estates. That was about three years ago and it's done very well since.  :)

DSC_0025.JPG

11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a little grove of twelve Carpoxylon macrospermum, with a Clinostigma in the center. Here are a few of them.

DSC_0026.JPG

16

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And a grove of Clinostigma savoryanum.

DSC_0029.JPG

13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a total of eight Tahina spectabilis in the ground. Six of them are visible in this photo.

DSC_0030.JPG

15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clinostigma samoense - one of my definite favorites and I have a bunch of these sprinkled throughout the garden. :)

DSC_0031.JPG

DSC_0033.JPG

13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marojejya darianii - another winner! I have about half a dozen in the ground. These are the two largest ones.

DSC_0034.JPG

12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lemurophoenix halleuxii, and a special story about this little guy. I have five smaller Lemurs in this area, none taller than about 2 feet. About 3-4 months ago I realized that when the weeds are twice as tall as the palms (or more) it's time to take action so I went in with the weed whacker. I had a general idea where the five Lemurs were planted, and none of them was visible because of the much taller weeds. Despite being very cautious, or so I thought, I managed to totally weed whack one of the Lemurs. Big OOOPS! :o I mean, down to the GROUND. There was nothing left of it and needless to saw I was bummed about it, promising myself to be more careful in the future and always hand weed around smaller palms before weed whacking the area. About three days ago I happened to look out one of my windows, across the driveway, and I saw a little red frond exactly where the weed whacked Lemur had been. And sure enough, the Lemur LIVES! B)   That definitely amazed me.

DSC_0036.JPG

12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dypsis sp. dark mealybug. About a dozen on this little mound, right in front of my house.

DSC_0037.JPG

11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And one of my three Dypsis marojejyi, or I guess it's now Dypsis coursii, or as many of us call it: the "Mad Fox". And I can add another name, which we have adopted here locally. First, the rather cute story behind it. A few years ago HIPS had a garden tour at Dean Ouer's garden on the Kona side ("DypsisDean" and our moderator here on the forum). Excellent turnout to view Dean's spectacular garden and lots of people who were new to palms. At one point a lady came up to me and said "there is a neat looking palm over there and it's getting a lot of attention. What is it?" and I asked, "well, which one?" and she said "I think they are calling it the Crazy Fox"! :lol: Well, close enough! :mrlooney: So now we refer to it as "The Crazy Fox".

DSC_0039.JPG

11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A group of Dypsis saintelucei.

DSC_0040.JPG

20

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Between Kim and myself, I believe we have a total of 28 Bentinckia condapanna along this trail. Here are a few of them.

DSC_0042.JPG

DSC_0043.JPG

DSC_0046.JPG

15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another of numerous Dypsis prestoniana in the garden. Prestonianas all do extremely well here, but this one has been absolutely fantastic with its growth. The second photo shows it on the day I had planted it, January 2nd, 2011, just over seven years ago. It's the scrawny little pathetic palm just slightly below and to the left of the blue tarpaulin.

DSC_0044.JPG

2011-01-02 022.JPG

15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Metroxylon amicarum - and while this technically is on Kim's property :lol: I decided to post it here anyway. I was fortunate to acquire this palm around 2014 at a HIPS presentation at UH Hilo. It was in a one gallon pot and no more than 12 inches tall or so. It must be pushing about 30 ft now I think. Anyway, we decided to plant it close to the trail with the condapannas, and at the back of Kim's property and we refer to it as "our amicarum". B) (Oh, and for the moment, that's all! :) ).

DSC_0045.JPG

10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Impressive! This is an amazing garden / jungle! Thank you for sharing this with us. 

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bgl said:

I have a total of eight Tahina spectabilis in the ground. Six of them are visible in this photo.

DSC_0030.JPG

Wow, 8 Tahina's! Beautiful garden!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pictures speak volumes....

Incredible garden Bo.

:drool: 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, 

Your garden is incredible. I hope to visit it in person some time. I do appreciate the photos to tye me over until then. Thank you

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bo, I'm impressed both with the work involved and with the potential satisfaction to be had from a beautiful garden like yours. Thanks for sharing the results!

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh. My. Gosh. Paradise for sure! Amazing palms, amazing ‘jungle’! Thank you so much for taking time to post all these photos. Going to bed now, hoping to dream of the good life in Hawaii! :wub:

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh man I am melting over here! Great jungle! I am hoping to relocate near you one day if I can find a job out there ;) Waiting til I get my architectural license at the least before i move.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, great photos. Thank you Bo!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:drool::drool::drool:

That is all...

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice! I am envious of your palms that I can't grow here!  I am happy I don't grow weeds like you do though.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to see you posting some garden photos again! Makes me really miss my garden, but I'll be there soon. :) Your St. Luceii and Tahina grove are the bomb!

 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your garden shows excellent taste, no doubt elevated by your experience growing your first garden in HI. You certainly have selected many of my favorites!

Both you and Kim inspire me over and over when I see the amazing growth of your collection, yet managing significant time away for travel/work. Thanks so much for posting!

 

(As a side note I think it is charming that in the last 30 days I happen to run into both CB Lisa and Chatta in FL at non palm events and now all three of us have posted on the same topic, admiring photos from Hawaii. Thanks again to Palmtalk ( courtesy of the IPS ) for making this possible. Both Bo and Kim have been big supporters of PT over many years and I for one am very grateful to you.)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW! WOW! AND WOW! Very Impressive. Thanks for sharing.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all your overwhelming comments! :) Despite it being just over seven years now, this "garden" is still very much a work in progress, and in all likelihood, will remain so for a very long time. Yes, I am still planting stuff, and will continue to do so, but I have also accepted the fact that this will probably never be a "palm garden" in the truest sense. More like "a jungle with palms in it". Which is fine with me! As a young boy growing up in Sweden I was fascinated by tropical environments and rainforests, and the thought of actually owning a small part of a true rainforest would have seemed totally beyond reach at the time. In other words, be very careful what you wish for - you may get it! :D And a quick comment to Cindy's side note - I couldn't agree more. PalmTalk is a great place to meet others, around the world, who have similar interests and I have been very fortunate over the years to meet many of you. An IPS Biennial is the most perfect venue but taking the initiative to actually travel and meet other PalmTalk members and see their gardens is an amazing and enriching experience.:) Again, thanks for all the comments.:)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll say you"ve gotta jungle of a garden! Looks like you've been attacking and making progress on the weed front as well, and it shows.

Your palms look great and the en masse planting’s are really starting to shine. 

Tim

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have read this post over and over a dozen times. Reminds me of our 2 hour stroll through your garden last week. Thank you so much for the hospitality you extended to Tina and I. Loved hearing all the stories and can't wait to return and do it again. Cheers!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unbelievable palm collection! Concerning the seedling among the weeds, that also happened to me, but it was just a chamaedorea radicalis :D

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/15/2018, 4:07:08, bgl said:

I have a total of eight Tahina spectabilis in the ground. Six of them are visible in this photo.

DSC_0030.JPG

Beautiful garden and this still is really my fav...:drool::yay:

.

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:drool: yes a wonderful garden, great diversity and super happy palms, its a work of art.  

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now