Whats the fastest growing tree in your garden?

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Just curious on what growers in your garden have grown fast.

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Rainbow Eucalyptus and silk floss are neck and neck.

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Silk floss tree as in  Albizia julibrissin or Ceiba speciosa?

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5 hours ago, jb1336 said:

Silk floss tree as in  Albizia julibrissin or Ceiba speciosa?

Sorry, Ceiba species. My silk floss are most likely hybrids - grown from seeds I collected from trees in old landscaping here in Naples. I also have a Bombax ceiba (red silk cotton) that it a FAST grower.

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Albizia is really fast. 

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Metasequoia (dawn redwood) and Eucalpytus gunnii.

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The live oak in the front has grown really fast.  More of a shrub than a tree, but sea grapes grow extraordinarily fast here.

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I have only planted a few non-palm trees, and of those, Michelia champaca 'Alba' is the fastest. The scented flowers, though small, are wonderfully perfumed.

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Eucalyptus viminalis hands down the fastest tree in my garden. I have two planted to feed the local Koalas. One was choped down in height by the powerline contractors even though it was well clear of the lines, that tree has powered on to be the tallest. At 7 years old they are far from their potential height of 60 meters tall, that won't be that far away.

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12 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

sea grapes grow extraordinarily fast here.

Do yours get toasted by frost? Mine do! :crying:

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13 minutes ago, Missi said:

Do yours get toasted by frost? Mine do! :crying:

Mine haven't been toasted in the time that I've had them (2013).  They are in the backyard, aka the "no frost zone". 

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The fastest growers at Leu Gardens;

Schizolobium parahyba- Fern Tree, One specimen grew 30ft from a seedling in 2 1/2 years

Eucalyptus deglupta- Rainbow Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus grandis (30ft in 3 1/2 years, blown over in Hurricane Charley)

Corymbia (Eucalyptus) citriodora- Lemon Eucalyptus

Cecropia peltata

Bombax ceiba

Ceiba speciosa

Acacia holosericea

Vachellia (Acacia) sieberiana- Paperbark Acacia

Acrocarpus frxinifolius- Shingle Tree

Camptotheca acuminata- Chinese Happy Tree

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for me they are

1) acacia dealbada.

from seed to 22' tall in 13 months

this tree is crazy fast. never seen a tree grow so fast and when it blooms the tree turns completely yellow

 

2) rainbow euc

from seed to 17' tall 13 months

 

3. Schizolobium parahyba

from seed to 15' tall in 16 months

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Eucalyptus grandis. I planted one in July of 2011 as a 4 feet sapling, and it grew to an estimated 75 feet by September 2017 -- when Hurricane Irma toppled it. I cut it up. The growth rings for some years were about 2 inches wide. Surprisingly, the wood is fairly heavy (dense), far more than I thought it would be.

I had two ear trees (Enterlobium), one cyclocarpum and one contortisliquum that were toppled, and the wood of those species is much lighter and softer --and these were fast growing trees, but not near as fast as E. grandis.

 

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I dig this thread!!!

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Bombax ceiba and Inga.  

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On 1/12/2018, 8:37:01, Eric in Orlando said:

The fastest growers at Leu Gardens;

Schizolobium parahyba- Fern Tree, One specimen grew 30ft from a seedling in 2 1/2 years

Eucalyptus deglupta- Rainbow Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus grandis (30ft in 3 1/2 years, blown over in Hurricane Charley)

Corymbia (Eucalyptus) citriodora- Lemon Eucalyptus

Cecropia peltata

Bombax ceiba

Ceiba speciosa

Acacia holosericea

Vachellia (Acacia) sieberiana- Paperbark Acacia

Acrocarpus frxinifolius- Shingle Tree

Camptotheca acuminata- Chinese Happy Tree

Eric, thanks for your list.  I wonder -- how many of these trees are long-term survivors in winds or hurricanes? Conventional wisdom has been if a tree grows fast, it tends to be weak. Can you relate experiences with these trees in regard to holding their branches and sturdiness of root systems at Leu Gardens? (I see the one note about the Eucalyptus grandis.)

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I'm gonna try Schizolobium parahyba out here in the spring to fall and see how tall it gets until the frost bakes it too a crisp.

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On ‎1‎/‎10‎/‎2018‎ ‎9‎:‎45‎:‎46‎, Missi said:

Sorry, Ceiba species. My silk floss are most likely hybrids - grown from seeds I collected from trees in old landscaping here in Naples. I also have a Bombax ceiba (red silk cotton) that it a FAST grower.

Bombax Ceiba, causalty of Hurricane Irma. Snapped 2 foot above ground level. Blocked entire street for 8 days until big equipment showed up.

Rainbow Eucalyptus took a beating. Brittle branched broke way, making come back now.

Cadang oderata got beat up bad too. Slowly coming back ...

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1 hour ago, Moose said:

Bombax Ceiba, causalty of Hurricane Irma. Snapped 2 foot above ground level. Blocked entire street for 8 days until big equipment showed up.

Rainbow Eucalyptus took a beating. Brittle branched broke way, making come back now.

Cadang oderata got beat up bad too. Slowly coming back ...

Dang! I wonder why the Ceiba species are so prone to coming down in hurricanes.

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1 hour ago, Missi said:

Dang! I wonder why the Ceiba species are so prone to coming down in hurricanes.

I wonder if it has to do with the Genus being one that is more likely to be naturally shallow rooted??.  

Had read something discussing the difference in the rooting tendencies of trees from tropical areas vs. trees from places where rainfall occurs more in winter, or, over a wider time frame throughout the year. While the article's main focus was on our native desert trees ( Palo Verde, Ironwood, and Mesquite) verses others from further south in Sonora which put out more root mass closer to the surface so they are better able to take advantage of summer season rainfall vs. the above mentioned Genus, among others, whose root systems dive deeper, and are better able to access underground aquifer reserves in times of drought. Mesquite can drop roots nearly 200' down, though most don't.

Looking at the general thoughts in the article, it's not far off to assume this distinction is repeated across the globe.. perhaps a reason trees like Delonix regia throw around alot of surface roots, thus, need space in a landscape. 

Regardless of natural tendency or simply a symptom of improper care during installation and early years of development/ growth, trees that don't have a deeper and more secure foundation will always be more subject to wind throw/ blow down. Soil structure/ composition will also effect how well or poorly a tree's root system develops.

Other trees have evolved to shed branches/ limbs either during times of drought, or under severe weather conditions. Gumbo Limbo and many Eucalyptus sp. are two distinct examples. Perhaps a good reference point for anyone planning out a home landscape. 

While currently container bound and awaiting a place to spread out, I'd say the three fastest trees I have are Gumbo Limbo, Madre De Cacao, and Enterolobium. The largest Gumbo Limbo specimen is almost as fast as Mesquite during the summer once Monsoon season starts. Peltophorum dubium, and Bursera silveae are close seconds.

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