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Rhapidophyllum hystrix making it "safer" for kids and animals

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Wondering if its possible to make this one safer for kids, or will the needles grow back with a vengeance? Reason I ask is Im planning on putting one in an area where balls/kids and animals might go. Thanks yall!

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@mdsonofthesouth Depending on the size you get, it might be a long time until it has enough needles to be a nuisance.  I've had mine for 7 years.  It is barely past knee high and I've never got gouged by it.  I don't think the cat has either. ;)

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Agave are more dangerous than needle palms.

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1 hour ago, kinzyjr said:

@mdsonofthesouth Depending on the size you get, it might be a long time until it has enough needles to be a nuisance.  I've had mine for 7 years.  It is barely past knee high and I've never got gouged by it.  I don't think the cat has either. ;)

 

Yeah slow grower for sure, I'm just worried about kids falling into one playing outside. 

 

1 hour ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Agave are more dangerous than needle palms.

 

My yucca gloriosa var lone star go through even the thickest pants...

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Those needles are held close to the stem which is surrounded by leaves. A kid would have to wrap himself around it and hug it with a vengeance then pray to be scratched. He is more likely to be skewered by rose bushes or holly planted in many yards. Kids grow faster than needle palms and soon move on to electronics and hanging out. After they bail on you, you will still have a loyal needle palm to console you. Go for your dreams.

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1 hour ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Those needles are held close to the stem which is surrounded by leaves. A kid would have to wrap himself around it and hug it with a vengeance then pray to be scratched. He is more likely to be skewered by rose bushes or holly planted in many yards. Kids grow faster than needle palms and soon move on to electronics and hanging out. After they bail on you, you will still have a loyal needle palm to console you. Go for your dreams.

 

Haha yeah I hear ya and I certainly will once @TexasColdHardyPalms has a good specimen for me to plant. 

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I found a few large 10G ones tucked away last week that I may decide to sell instead of plant in the ground.. 

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2 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

I found a few large 10G ones tucked away last week that I may decide to sell instead of plant in the ground.. 

 

If you do I might be your guy! 

 

1 hour ago, kinzyjr said:

@mdsonofthesouth & @TexasColdHardyPalms Everything/Everyone has a price ;)

 

haha yes it does! Mine usually is healthy plants lol:P

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Some people prune lower leaves, but the one we planted in full sun is mostly untouched and grows a full crown that touches the ground all the way around and prevents most things/critters from getting near the trunk.

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6 minutes ago, redbeard917 said:

Some people prune lower leaves, but the one we planted in full sun is mostly untouched and grows a full crown that touches the ground all the way around and prevents most things/critters from getting near the trunk.

 

Honestly I think a full un-pruned needle looks stately, and if I can secure one it will be full sun or very close to it.

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We cant grow them full sun down here. I had one with 2' of trunk finally die from too much sun after i moved a tree two years ago. It just started to decline and go into a death spiral. 

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We have a brutal enough summer from May through September to make the trachycarpus hate life on some days without a good dose of water. But we do have enough of a cool early spring, late fall and winter to cool them off. @TexasColdHardyPalms where your'e at is pretty dry generally speaking right? 

Edited by mdsonofthesouth
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In full sun they like wet feet.

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We get 37" of rain a year so we aren't dry, just super hot with brutal sun.

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We are about the same here & humid as hell. I have two in full sun and never miss a beat. They started out as 5 gal plants about 15 years ago.

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When I planted them.

 

2h58ww5.jpg

 

Now...

 

9aqweq.jpg

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I have a needle planted, it is still small, only about two feet off of the ground with a lot of suckers, the needles are like long toothpicks. I have seen some massive ones around here and it is the only palm that I would buy from a place like Lowes since I know it wont get shocked from a Virginia winter after being shipped in from Florida. I love them! 

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1 minute ago, Laaz said:

When I planted them.

 

2h58ww5.jpg

 

Now...

 

9aqweq.jpg

Wow! The one in the bottom right looks like mine now, but mine has a bunch of suckers around it. Can't you propagate the suckers?

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Yeah, the pups root real easy as long as you get a decent piece of root with it.

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Rooted pups.

 

besrvd.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Laaz said:

Yeah, the pups root real easy as long as you get a decent piece of root with it.

Well you just put an idea in my head, once the suckers or if new suckers move close to the grass from my planter I will probably dig them up. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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Just now, Laaz said:

Rooted pups.

 

besrvd.jpg

Those look nice, thank you!

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I have small kids and was not all that concerned by the needles (nothing compared to the wild blackberries and fire ants that I can't get under control).

As far as growth rate, middle of the road is my experience so far.  Faster than S. minor or C. humilis, slower than Butia, about the same as Windmill.  I planted a "blue pot" needle (2 gallon) that's now probably ~7 gal after 2 years in the ground.  Planted in a low, wet spot in about 75% sun.  A second "blue pot" needle promptly died after being planted.

Steve

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Now I really want one!

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I have one left under canopy near the house on the west side yard. They can’t take full FL sun down here. I’m a bit too south of their natural range but I wanted to have a representative of each native palm species.

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Rhapidophyllum hystrix is the first palm i wanted to try and the hardest to find. I keep seeing Banana Joe getting HD versions and read about folks online getting them easy at HD. Yet they aren't one of the several species they sell around here. Weird that they sell chamerops humilis as an outdoor palm but not rhapidophyllum.

 

@PalmatierMeg Im jealous of your location. The more we get this freak weather theb more I try and nudge the wife to move, even showing the possible snow they said outside the Tampa area and she wont budge. Sadly and all jokes aside if I'm going to live in my favortite place it will be alone.:(

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My advice is buy the palm, shoot the animals and ban the children. Both are overrated.:lol:

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Haha not an option they will just have to learn the hard way!

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On 29/12/2017, 05:12:37, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

Yeah slow grower for sure, I'm just worried about kids falling into one playing outside. 

 

 

My yucca gloriosa var lone star go through even the thickest pants...

if they do fall into it it will probably only happen once XD

my dogs are really respectful of my agave's-- its satisfying to see them take care as they scamper around 

Edited by Jamesasb
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