Growing your soil - for all the beginners

52 posts in this topic

Please, everyone, keep the posts coming.

There are so many maestros out there who aren't saying anything.

Please say.

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fairchild tropical botanical gardens has an amazing variety of palms from around the world. How does a place of that size cope with their south Florida soil? Especially with the broad soil requirements of each and every palm? 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Stethoscope said:

Fairchild tropical botanical gardens has an amazing variety of palms from around the world. How does a place of that size cope with their south Florida soil? Especially with the broad soil requirements of each and every palm? 

Good question!!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Stethoscope said:

Fairchild tropical botanical gardens has an amazing variety of palms from around the world. How does a place of that size cope with their south Florida soil? Especially with the broad soil requirements of each and every palm? 

I believe they dug out pits and filled with soil amendments. I can't remember if I read that here or in the IPS Facebook group. Also, they use a bunch of mulch and fertilizer.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting to read what everyone deals with and how they've overcome the obstacles to grow healthy palms.

5 years ago my wife and I purchased an older home on a double lot with absolutely no landscaping and we thought it would be a 6 month project lol. When I say "absolutely none", I mean N. O. N. E., no trees, no grass, nothing. My wife thought I was crazy but all I saw was a blank canvas. Anyways, I soon found out why there were no plants. The house sits on a sand ridge, close to the coast. The soil had ZERO organics in it. If you watered, it wouldn't get past the surface, it would just run off. The good news is my septic drains like a champ, so I should be good there.

5 years down the road, tons of trial and error, learning (thank you forum members), truckload after truckload of topsoil and pine bark mulch, lots of Mycorrhizae, worms, and a healthy irrigation system and I've actually changed the local ecosystem. You can't dig without finding worms, a web of Mycorrhizae, and countless other critters. At this point, I feel safe to plant anything here that will survive our climate as I know the soil is up to the task.

I've learned, cussed, laughed, and spent many sore/sleepless nights but the rewards are so worth it and will last a lifetime.

6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still too early to tell. But my case was the other way around: I replaced the native soil for pure sand in five (3'x3'x3') spots in the garden. Last year I had two coconut seedlings die due to root rot. I did add mycorrhizae to the roots of the then-newly planted coconut seedlings. Here again, it's probably too early to tell. But I already have four coconut seedlings/juvenile which went through last years complete and very wet (record rainfall I believe)winter season. 

 

Edited by GottmitAlex
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, PalmWarbler said:

Interesting to read what everyone deals with and how they've overcome the obstacles to grow healthy palms.

5 years ago my wife and I purchased an older home on a double lot with absolutely no landscaping and we thought it would be a 6 month project lol. When I say "absolutely none", I mean N. O. N. E., no trees, no grass, nothing. My wife thought I was crazy but all I saw was a blank canvas. Anyways, I soon found out why there were no plants. The house sits on a sand ridge, close to the coast. The soil had ZERO organics in it. If you watered, it wouldn't get past the surface, it would just run off. The good news is my septic drains like a champ, so I should be good there.

5 years down the road, tons of trial and error, learning (thank you forum members), truckload after truckload of topsoil and pine bark mulch, lots of Mycorrhizae, worms, and a healthy irrigation system and I've actually changed the local ecosystem. You can't dig without finding worms, a web of Mycorrhizae, and countless other critters. At this point, I feel safe to plant anything here that will survive our climate as I know the soil is up to the task.

I've learned, cussed, laughed, and spent many sore/sleepless nights but the rewards are so worth it and will last a lifetime.

Keep adding organics. Anything you can find, old political fliers on paper, dead dogs, etc.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

Keep adding organics. Anything you can find, old political fliers on paper, dead dogs, etc.

Right on the money, DD. Road kill will add a lot of good stuff! Another thought, when I remove palms, some times I have them cut them off at soil level and let the roots rot and create, over time, a nice organic bio-mass in the area, and more earth worms, which just adds to my clay-loaminess soil. The breakdown may take a a few to several years and might suck up some nitrogen, but I have done this with three post-flowering Carlota Urens  and a single queen palm in my yard. Also saves on the cost of stump grinding or digging out the trunk!

 

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, DoomsDave said:

Keep adding organics. Anything you can find, old political fliers on paper, dead dogs, etc.

Unruly neighbors.... ;-)

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, PalmWarbler said:

Interesting to read what everyone deals with and how they've overcome the obstacles to grow healthy palms.

5 years ago my wife and I purchased an older home on a double lot with absolutely no landscaping and we thought it would be a 6 month project lol. When I say "absolutely none", I mean N. O. N. E., no trees, no grass, nothing. My wife thought I was crazy but all I saw was a blank canvas. Anyways, I soon found out why there were no plants. The house sits on a sand ridge, close to the coast. The soil had ZERO organics in it. If you watered, it wouldn't get past the surface, it would just run off. The good news is my septic drains like a champ, so I should be good there.

5 years down the road, tons of trial and error, learning (thank you forum members), truckload after truckload of topsoil and pine bark mulch, lots of Mycorrhizae, worms, and a healthy irrigation system and I've actually changed the local ecosystem. You can't dig without finding worms, a web of Mycorrhizae, and countless other critters. At this point, I feel safe to plant anything here that will survive our climate as I know the soil is up to the task.

I've learned, cussed, laughed, and spent many sore/sleepless nights but the rewards are so worth it and will last a lifetime.

That's incredible! You're not worried it might eventually all leach away?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My deceased chickens go in the compost pit :hmm: Back to the earth with you!

My dogs, however, will be cremated :innocent:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now