Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Northern California: Areca vestiaria in unheated sunroom

14 posts in this topic

I got this Areca vestiaria years ago as a germinated seed from RPS. It's the only one of a group that's thrived. It's always been indoors in a room that only gets morning light/heat (i.e., my sunroom faces east). Some of the offshoots from the main stem declined and I've had to spray for scale now and then, but otherwise it's done OK under a relatively low-humidity, shady, highly variable temperature regime. It's my suspicion, beyond mere acclimation, that success with certain palm genera under less than ideal [challenging?] growing conditions may be dependent on the specific genetics of an individual palm. 

ArecaV-2.jpg

ArecaV-1.jpg

10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a subset of an ecotype, usually. This species has been collected at varying altitudes on Sulawesi. Notwithstanding comments on Palmpedia, I always found the maroon or red cs and flush types markedly more cold tolerant than the orange or yellow cs forms. I believe that latter color forms a uniform bust as garden plant at ~1600 m in Guatemala, whereas maroons thrive in both the lowlands and highlands.

J

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, stone jaguar said:

As a subset of an ecotype, usually. This species has been collected at varying altitudes on Sulawesi. Notwithstanding comments on Palmpedia, I always found the maroon or red cs and flush types markedly more cold tolerant than the orange or yellow cs forms. I believe that latter color forms a uniform bust as garden plant at ~1600 m in Guatemala, whereas maroons thrive in both the lowlands and highlands.

J

Stone Jaguar: That makes a lot of sense, thanks for sharing. I may be spending too much time with my palms and seeing each one as an individual! LOL

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A. vestie is a heartbreaker to grow. Pics from my indoor atrium, where I suspect they die because the temps hit well over 100f. 

IMG_0050.JPG

IMG_0051.JPG

IMG_0052.JPG

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Potted on the patio. 

IMG_0057.JPG

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of all the Areca species, I can grow macrocalyx, dwarf catechu, ipot (barely), but the vesties have embarrassed me. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/19/2017, 12:48:06, Hillizard said:

I got this Areca vestiaria years ago as a germinated seed from RPS. It's the only one of a group that's thrived. It's always been indoors in a room that only gets morning light/heat (i.e., my sunroom faces east). Some of the offshoots from the main stem declined and I've had to spray for scale now and then, but otherwise it's done OK under a relatively low-humidity, shady, highly variable temperature regime. It's my suspicion, beyond mere acclimation, that success with certain palm genera under less than ideal [challenging?] growing conditions may be dependent on the specific genetics of an individual palm. 

ArecaV-2.jpg

ArecaV-1.jpg

Knock out orange, my favorite of the three. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting that you can grow macrocalyx but not vestiaria "Maroon". I have found that they thrive under same conditions...both quite tolerant of heat if they get cooled off at night. They are all much trickier in pots indoors than in the ground or on a shady patio.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one that looks okay, and yes its a maroon. I can tell you for sure they are much less tolerant of sun than the oranges, but then again, neither can take any TX sun at all, they just croak faster.  About the heat,you may be right, under weed barrier, both are in full shade, and the red does look better than the orange and yellow.  

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/26/2017, 8:42:39, stone jaguar said:

Interesting that you can grow macrocalyx but not vestiaria "Maroon". I have found that they thrive under same conditions...both quite tolerant of heat if they get cooled off at night. 

I think you just nailed my problem.  In my atrium, temps can push 120f during August, and it only drops down to the mid 80's at night, it never really cools off. Maybe that's what the vesties hate, I lost count of how many I've lost in there, whereas the two macrocalyx took off on the first try. The catechu needed shade cloth the first summer, now it's totally happy in full sun. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/27/2017, 12:21:30, topwater said:

I have one that looks okay, and yes its a maroon. I can tell you for sure they are much less tolerant of sun than the oranges, but then again, neither can take any TX sun at all, they just croak faster.  About the heat,you may be right, under weed barrier, both are in full shade, and the red does look better than the orange and yellow.  

 

FWIW, mine takes filtered S. FL sun. :hmm:

On 8/28/2017, 2:26:39, topwater said:

I think you just nailed my problem.  In my atrium, temps can push 120f during August, and it only drops down to the mid 80's at night, it never really cools off. Maybe that's what the vesties hate, I lost count of how many I've lost in there, whereas the two macrocalyx took off on the first try. The catechu needed shade cloth the first summer, now it's totally happy in full sun. 

What if you also ran a ran at night? :huh:

Edited by Missi
TYP-OH!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do, the other top corner has an exhaust fan running on a thermostat, I'm sure it'd be much hotter without it. I hate to say this, but your not going to like going from 10a to zone 9,  its coconuts to alfies  :)  Half a grow zone is huge. I don't mind cus it's all I've ever known, you however, have been spoiled living in palm paradaise. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boy, I'm glad you knew what I mean lol "Ran a ran"? :rolleyes:

I know I'm not going to like it, but I have to find the warmest growing area out of my only options :crying: Actually, where I live in inland Naples, you can't even grow coconuts because every few years we get a freeze :indifferent: In Naples, it's only 10a west of Interstate 75.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, topwater said:

 you however, have been spoiled living in palm paradaise. 

Hey I was born and raised close to Chicago, so I put in my time! :P

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • Mystery Chamaerops humilis
      By xvang01
      I'm not a big fan of Mediterranean fan palm. But I came across this weird looking chamaerops humilis that i found to be interesting. There a ton of mediterranean palm around the town and city but I have not seen one like it. 
    • What Is Your Favorite "Scrubby" Palm?
      By PalmTreeDude
      What is your favorite palm that tends to be scrubby and more low lying (typically) in habitat? Mine is the Sabal minor, simply because I love the looks of them and because they are hardy here. What is yours? It does not have to be hardy! 
    • Holiday Sale on 'The Palms of Cuba'
      By Licuala
      My book, The Palms of Cuba' is on sale for the Holiday from now until December 10! Books are available for $33.95, which is 15% off the retail price of $39.95! This limited time sale includes free shipping within the U.S. and the books being personally autographed through my website, www.palmnutpages.com!   This is the perfect gift for the palm enthusiast on your gift list! Order yours today!;-)


    • Tresco's Abbey Gardens, UK
      By UK_Palms
      You would be forgiven for thinking this is California, but I can assure you this is in the UK. And unknown to most people, this hidden gem is probably the most northernly sub-tropical climate in the world, where many palm & plant varieties will grow, that aren't possible elsewhere at such a northern latitude. Despite being at 50N, winter lows are generally around 50F making it the mildest location in the world, for a place of this latitude. So mild in fact that Canary Island Date Palms thrive, with some specimens around 60-70ft tall. They are believed to have been planted around 1890.
      Other palm species such as Jubaea Chilensis, Butia Capitata, and Washingtonia Robusta are present, as well as various Trachycarpus types. Lots of Cordylines, Yuccas and other exotics as well. These are all growing at the same latitude as Winnipeg in Canada and northern Mongolia/southern Siberia in Asia. In fact it is 850 miles further north than Vladivstok in Russia, which sees temps below freezing for 4 months straight. Yet the climate in this place rarely drops below freezing. Maybe one frost every 2-3 years, which is truly remarkable for coastal Great Britain. 
      The garden itself is built on the remnants of a medieval monastery, circa 1350AD, with the ruins visible in the pics below, and surrounded by palms. It was also a refuge for Royalists during the English Civil War and was captured by Parliamentary Forces in 1551. A very interesting place and a palm lovers paradise, especially for us Brits!!!














    • Lanai Container Garden Fall Reorganization
      By PalmatierMeg
      Days have gotten shorter and rains stopped even though the weather is unusually hot and humid. But our bi-annual cleanup and reorganization of the tropical palm container garden proceeds. We emptied the lanai of everything except my huge Areca catechu dwarf, swept up loose debris, pressure washed the concrete, then soaked it overnight in bleach water. Yesterday I returned the tropical container palms to dollies or plastic shelving units (I don't let any pots sit directly on concrete, which can conduct cold in winter or stay wet after rain). I repotted and staked palms as needed, then watered them with Merit imidacloprid powder dissolved in water. My Cham metallicas were already developing mealybugs. I still have to fertilize and spray miticide to ward off spider mites that thrive in cool, dry weather. I tie lengths of fluorescent plastic ribbons on all highly cold sensitive palms to aid IDs when I have to move them indoors on cold winter nights. A lot of work but necessary if I want to keep palms healthy.
      I took the following photos this evening.