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Sabal x Brazoriensis

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Posted (edited)

I saw a mature brazoria palm at barton springs for the first time and was amazed at it's incredible mass and huge leaves. They almost remind of green bismarcks or a sabal minor on steroids. I thought sabal mexicanas were cool until I saw this Brazoria. For some reason I assumed this ancient hybrid had a small trunk. Not so.

Anybody here growing these? I would love to see more photos of them.

Here's a picture of it... sorry for the quality... it was taken from the car through the fence with the phone. I'll get a close-up next time I'm over there.

 

 

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Edited by Brian F. Austin
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Man that palm is huge all right love it! :yay: 

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Beautiful specimen! A friend of mine is growing one in Wichita, it is sending up a flower stalk now...Hope I can grab some seeds this year! :) 

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I want one and have the perfect spot for one! anyone have a good place to get these???

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Ok I went back to check it out and get some more photos and take home a souvenir :)

Here's the photos of the large tree labeled as a Brazoria Palm, a couple details of it's structure, and some potted plants they had for sale... and the one I picked.

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That's a great souvenir you got there Brian. It's very cool that you found a brazoria that big that wasn't in the wild. Big ones don't seem that common yet, so it's neat to see what all of these smaller specimens that palm lovers are planting will grow up to be.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Ben! I'm looking forward to growing it out.

I would love to find a seed source for Brazoria palms. If anybody knows, please message me. My wife's family has land in the Brazos valley and I'd really like to plant some large numbers of these and S. Mexicana in the creek bottoms and along the ponds. It's in zone 8b, but it definitely gets colder there than it does here in Austin.

Here's a fun photo I took today of a s. mexicana

 

 

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Edited by Brian F. Austin
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Hi,

I too like to find a source for seeds as it's not affordable to buy plants from the US due to a lot of expensive paperworks needed by the customs.

For seeds it's not a problem.

Eckhard

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On 4/28/2017, 1:06:17, jfrye01@live.com said:

Beautiful specimen! A friend of mine is growing one in Wichita, it is sending up a flower stalk now...Hope I can grab some seeds this year! :) 

Good luck, I'd like to see what the seeds look like. I know they are smaller than s. mexicanas. I saw the photo you posted of his straplings, they look great. Do you have a photo of the flowering plant?

On 5/1/2017, 7:45:46, mdsonofthesouth said:

I want one and have the perfect spot for one! anyone have a good place to get these???

I picked this 5g at barton springs nursery in Austin. They didn't have any 1 gallons or I would've bought all of them :)  They had a few large ones and some greenish s. uresanas as well. They did have s. uresana in 1 gallons... to my eyes they didn't look very blue, but I know they can be variable.

To me it looked like most of the 5gallon brazorias had 2 plants growing in the same pot. I picked the one that just had 1 in it. I didn't want to deal with separating them or having them grow into each other.

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On 5/12/2017, 11:15:43, Brian F. Austin said:

Good luck, I'd like to see what the seeds look like. I know they are smaller than s. mexicanas. I saw the photo you posted of his straplings, they look great. Do you have a photo of the flowering plant?

I picked this 5g at barton springs nursery in Austin. They didn't have any 1 gallons or I would've bought all of them :)  They had a few large ones and some greenish s. uresanas as well. They did have s. uresana in 1 gallons... to my eyes they didn't look very blue, but I know they can be variable.

To me it looked like most of the 5gallon brazorias had 2 plants growing in the same pot. I picked the one that just had 1 in it. I didn't want to deal with separating them or having them grow into each other.

On 5/12/2017, 11:15:43, Brian F. Austin said:

Good luck, I'd like to see what the seeds look like. I know they are smaller than s. mexicanas. I saw the photo you posted of his straplings, they look great. Do you have a photo of the flowering plant?

I picked this 5g at barton springs nursery in Austin. They didn't have any 1 gallons or I would've bought all of them :)  They had a few large ones and some greenish s. uresanas as well. They did have s. uresana in 1 gallons... to my eyes they didn't look very blue, but I know they can be variable.

To me it looked like most of the 5gallon brazorias had 2 plants growing in the same pot. I picked the one that just had 1 in it. I didn't want to deal with separating them or having them grow into each other.

On 5/1/2017, 7:45:46, mdsonofthesouth said:

I want one and have the perfect spot for one! anyone have a good place to get these???

I took these pictures about a month ago, I'm sure the stalk is huge now! 

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Thanks for the photo J, It's cool that they can flower before they trunk. i've been watching the progress of s. mexicana in the neighborhood pushing up stalks. it's interesting the variability in the lengths. I can't wait to harvest seeds from my favorite mexicanas.

I saw a small trunked palm at Mayfield park the other day that looked out of place among all the tall S. mexicanas around. it looked about like the brazoria above with a split in the middle of the frond. One floppy frond was snapped on the right side. Also it had flowered before. You can see the old and new flower stalks in the photos. It did have a cool color also, little more matte green. Maybe a s. minor lousiana? Anybody care to guess?

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These are so awesome! But how coldhardy are they really? How do they handle long lasting freezes and moist winters?

I can grow Sabal minor without protection and also T. fortunei most winters. Sabal x brazoriensis looks like the only chance I have to grow a massive fan palm.

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On 2017-5-7 14:20:31, Palmensammler said:

Hi,

I too like to find a source for seeds as it's not affordable to buy plants from the US due to a lot of expensive paperworks needed by the customs.

For seeds it's not a problem.

Eckhard

Hi Eckhard, I got a small one sent from palmeperpaket in Germany last winter. 

Might be worth asking them if they still have any.

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On 5/18/2017, 12:38:16, Brian F. Austin said:

Thanks for the photo J, It's cool that they can flower before they trunk. i've been watching the progress of s. mexicana in the neighborhood pushing up stalks. it's interesting the variability in the lengths. I can't wait to harvest seeds from my favorite mexicanas.

I saw a small trunked palm at Mayfield park the other day that looked out of place among all the tall S. mexicanas around. it looked about like the brazoria above with a split in the middle of the frond. One floppy frond was snapped on the right side. Also it had flowered before. You can see the old and new flower stalks in the photos. It did have a cool color also, little more matte green. Maybe a s. minor lousiana? Anybody care to guess?

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It could very well be S. brazoriensis.  When they are more mature, they become far more costapalmate than when young.  

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Hello Ivorhooper,

checked their homepage and recognized that they received a new delivery of them. As I will be in Munich in two weeks I'll drive by and pick up one. Thanks for the info, didn't check their page in the last time.

Eckhard

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On 2017-5-21 11:39:58, Palmensammler said:

Hello Ivorhooper,

checked their homepage and recognized that they received a new delivery of them. As I will be in Munich in two weeks I'll drive by and pick up one. Thanks for the info, didn't check their page in the last time.

Eckhard

That's good news. Mine was unfazed by winter and starting growing around March time albeit very slowly. Not too bad for the north of England!

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Posted (edited)

I grabbed a couple more camera phone pics. The trunk shot shows how many boots there are and how crammed together they are. It has a pretty messy look to the trunk, with a bit of a lean, but it is kind of tightly crammed into it's spot with rocks and sago palms around it.

The wide shot of the big palm shows just the tip of the flowering spike above the fronds.

There is a tall S. Mexicana next to it. The Brazoria seems to have a trunk twice as wide, twice as many fronds, and with petioles half the length. They said it's been in the ground ~20 years.  I also got a couple flowering photos from a potted one.

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Edited by Brian F. Austin
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I bought one of the Brazoria Sabals from Barton Springs Nursery back in the 1990s. It grew in my yard in Austin for about 18 years, and never formed a trunk taller than ~18 inches. It just seemed to get wider over the years, pushing the older leaf bases outward while the bud grew broader but stayed low. It looked just like a shorter version of the specimen at the nursery (I can vouch for it being in that spot for at least 20 years).

The leaves were quite large, like S. mexicana but with shorter petioles. The shape was in between S. minor and S. mexicana (not as flat as the former, not as undulating as the latter). Perhaps the oddest thing about this specimen was the color of the leaf petioles - they always turned a solid, chocolate brown early after emerging. I initially thought it had some disease, but it never seemed to harm the plant. No idea what was going on with that.

Unfortunately I eventually lost this one to the cursed Ox Beetle, along with both of my 24-year old Pindo palms and all 5 of my Windmills.

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Sorry to hear that you lost your palm from the OX Beetle.

That's interesting about the trunk, the one at barton springs nursery has the look that the trunk is expanding and the leaf bases are so densely packed in there it appears that they are folding over each other.

One discrepancy I found about the the Brazorias... I read that the inflorescence is held within the leaves, these at BSN seems to have flowers extended out and above like a s. minor. Check out these photos I pulled online of Brazorias. The trunk sure looks different. If the tree at BSN is 20 yrs old, then these must be ancient. The last photos is from Bob Harms' research.

http://w3.biosci.utexas.edu/prc/Sabal/Brazoria.html#infl

 

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Any Brazoria fans have any advise for growing one in my area? Are they similar in hardiness to a Trachy? It's a slow grower and I can see the leaves are going to be huge...just started taking off this summer.image.thumb.jpg.b75b017022a465d851f7a23c

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I've found these to be very slow growing.  In 2003 I planted six, 5 gal size plants all from the same seed batch. They are also slightly variable in terms of leaf shape, color and even cold hardiness.  I had one that experienced cold damage from the Feb 2011 cold blast, the rest were not affected.  They seem to be more cold hardy than s. mexicana, but much slower.  After 14 years of in ground growth, the two largest (that received consistent irrigation) have about 1' of trunk.  There are two very large ones at the TX Discovery Garden (Fair Park Dallas) that have been there for decades.  

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Here's two brazoriensis's at the JC Raulston Arboretum (Raleigh) that, according to their website, have been in the ground for 7-8 years. The one is not looking too good. It and some other Sabals near it have some scale (I think) and probably got some damage from last winter. I'm sure it'd also appreciate some more water. The other one is healthy and is a nice looking specimen. However, I didn't see any signs of inflorescences on it like the first one has. It's located in a different area that gets afternoon shade so that's probably the main reason the leaves are bigger and it's doing better. I'd estimate that they both have about ~1.5 foot trunk.

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Edited by djcary
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