cham vulcano yes or no

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Hi guys i'm tempted to buy a chamaerops vulcano with around 80-100cm of trunk or more.now it's going to cost me around £200-£230gbp it's the most i might be spending on a palm,can i ask what is so great and better about these palms e.g. what charistics do they have? will they survive winters of south east wales uk forever?how can i tell if it's male or female,will a palm of that size withstand even more cold,whats the max height of these vulcanos and what's the difference between this variation and regular c humilis,eand etna versions and dwarf versions.convince me people :)

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The volcano i have with 4-5' of trunk burned completely at 12f but is alive and currently growing.

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Are these even available in North America? As such, the questions posed by our England counterpart (palm789), I can not answer. All I've read on the net, lead me to think they'd be of fairly equal hardiness to C. humilis.

Cheers.

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I think vulcano is a great looking plant and only wish they were available here for a reasonable cost. Assume they are no more hardy than a regular humilis and once it flowers we can tell what sex it is. Have a look at all the images of it on google and then decide if it's a palm you like the look of. I would imagine that are pretty hardy in the UK unless you have one of those extra cold winters like in 2010/2011. Post a photo here if you do decide to buy it. Spring is a great time to plant a palm as they have all summer to get established.

 

Regards Neil

 

 

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I've grown vulcanos from seeds and found them variable on a spectrum from "normal" to extremely dwarfed, a la Areca catechu dwarf. If memory serves, about 40% of my seeds showed volcano traits, which wasn't a bad turnout. I have about half a dozen planted on my property. My seeds came from a palm lover in Italy but RPS sometimes sells them. Vulcanos aren't generally available in the US unless you are willing to DIY. They germinate and grow as easily as standard Chamaerops. My climate probably boosts results.

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I germinated a few hundred last year but they are all too small to identify traits or sort them out. 

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there are some in my local bnq garden center called dwsrf fan palm or dwarf med fan palm,are these other names for chamaerops vulcano,what charistics does the vulcano have that i must look for?

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Dwarf fan palm is just another name for Chamaerops humilis, this doesn't mean they are vulcano. Google image Chamaerops vulcano and you can see what they should look like. As the saying goes " A picture paints a thousand words". Post some photos of the ones in bnq if you want us to tell you what they are. Vulcano Chamaerops are almost always labelled as such as this is how they can justify charging a higher price.

 

Regards Neil

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But might be for sale at some point?

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Posted (edited)

On 18.3.2017, 16:10:56, palm789 said:

there are some in my local bnq garden center called dwsrf fan palm or dwarf med fan palm,are these other names for chamaerops vulcano,what charistics does the vulcano have that i must look for?

Go for very short, mostly thornless petioles and silverish underside of the leaves. Since this is not an accepted variety there are no officially accepted characteristics. In continental Europe it has proved to be the least hardy variety, var. argentea being the most hardy. But due to its small size it is easily protected. There is a variety called "etna"  and another "compacta" which are very similar. They are sales names and you just pick the one you like best. Here's a picture of my vulcano.

 

DSC_0001.thumb.jpg.9f9e71e139cc5c597c646

Edited by Flow
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55 minutes ago, Flow said:

Go for very short, mostly thornless petioles and silverish underside of the leaves. Since this is not an accepted variety there are no officially accepted characteristics. In continental Europe it has proved to be the least hardy variety, var. argentea being the most hardy. But due to its small size it is easily protected. There is a variety called "etna"  and another "compacta" which are very similar. They are sales names and you just pick the one you like best. Here's a picture of my vulcano.

 

DSC_0001.thumb.jpg.9f9e71e139cc5c597c646

Flo, yours is stellar (bit not stella)!

 

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