Thunbergia mysorensis

15 posts in this topic

Has anyone tried this vine in California? Seems to be fairly tolerant of cold down to the high 20s. I saw a magnificent example of this vine in Guatemala city several years ago and it would be nice to grow this here at home.

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GREAT topic.  I was just attempting some research to do the very same thing...grow in SoCal.

Looks like one site I found does indicate they will grow here.  My worry is how well they stand up to the dry heat and sun of summer.

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I've found they don't like dry heat but are okay with a bit of attention and protection.

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7 hours ago, tropicbreeze said:

I've found they don't like dry heat but are okay with a bit of attention and protection.

So some shade and wind protection? 

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Agree with tropic breeze, this great vine should stand a decent chance both in so. Cal, and the warmer parts of the Bay area/ Central Valley.. provided similar conditions you would provide anything that wants more shade, regular irrigation/ protection from dry wind. I myself would place it's overall hardiness / cultural wants in the same category as Beaumontia grandiflora, Petra volubilis.. though Queens Wreath can withstand more sun, at least nearer the coast.

In places like the L.A. basin, and San Diego, I'd think it would likely retain more foliage / grow on through most winters, ..where as further north, I'd think you might see it drop a lot ( most?) Foliage, but return from the roots if severely cut back by a frost ( like other Thunbergia: Black Eyed Susan vine, T. erecta, battiscombei, etc ) Amazed at how hardy these seem to be considering how awesome they are. Even so, only came across these a couple times outside Selby Gardens back in Florida.

Anyone trying Rangoon Creeper?.. can't remember if growing these in CA. had been discussed here before.. Another great, tropical looking vine regardless.. even if it can be a little aggressive. 

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I might have the prefect spot to give one a try this summer. I just purchased one online.. 

 

12 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Anyone trying Rangoon Creeper?.. can't remember if growing these in CA. had been discussed here before.. Another great, tropical looking vine regardless.. even if it can be a little aggressive. 

Silas, I've had quisqualis indica for several years (3+) and while i get lots of foliage, it has not bloomed for me yet. The foliage alone is nice though. It gets a coppery tone in cold weather.  I've never had issues with the cold, it drops some foliage in winter and that is about it. In this picture, Rangoon Creeper is climbing up the far post of the front porch.

20170210_112453.thumb.jpg.c1d27abc882f81

Edited by Jdiaz31089
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26 minutes ago, Jdiaz31089 said:

I might have the prefect spot to give one a try this summer. I just purchased one online.. 

 

Silas, I've had quisqualis indica for several years (3+) and while i get lots of foliage, it has not bloomed for me yet. The foliage alone is nice though. It gets a coppery tone in cold weather.  I've never had issues with the cold, it drops some foliage in winter and that is about it. In this picture, Rangoon Creeper is climbing up the far post of the front porch.

20170210_112453.thumb.jpg.c1d27abc882f81

Good to know..  I had a single-flowered specimen for a couple years but lost it last summer. Not completely sure if it was the heat, or if something else had already weakened it and made dealing with the heat here more stressful. Definitely plan on replacing..  and not placing it anywhere that faces west, lol. Flowers are well worth the wait. Good luck with the Clock Vine.

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15 hours ago, Hammer said:

So some shade and wind protection? 

Yes, some shade, extra water (but fast draining soil) and wind protection to reduce dessication. Mine struggles through the dry season (winter) because daytime temperatures are high with low relative humidity although nights are more moderate with higher RH. But it's on the leeward side of tall trees and dense vegetation sheltered from the prevailing dry season winds. On our east coast where they have lower (maximum) temperatures and higher RH it grows really well.

Rangoon Creeper is a tough plant. I found some at an abandoned mining camp where it's subject to a 5 month rainless hot period but still surviving after at least 50 years. Friends had some over an archway which flowered prolifically almost continuously. But it was a big job to keep it pruned back and stop the runners from spreading around so they eventually dug it out, with great difficulty. A good one to keep confined. Mine is in a spot where it has to cope with virtually no water over the dry season so it's reasonably easy to control.

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37 minutes ago, tropicbreeze said:

Yes, some shade, extra water (but fast draining soil) and wind protection to reduce dessication. Mine struggles through the dry season (winter) because daytime temperatures are high with low relative humidity although nights are more moderate with higher RH. But it's on the leeward side of tall trees and dense vegetation sheltered from the prevailing dry season winds. On our east coast where they have lower (maximum) temperatures and higher RH it grows really well.

Rangoon Creeper is a tough plant. I found some at an abandoned mining camp where it's subject to a 5 month rainless hot period but still surviving after at least 50 years. Friends had some over an archway which flowered prolifically almost continuously. But it was a big job to keep it pruned back and stop the runners from spreading around so they eventually dug it out, with great difficulty. A good one to keep confined. Mine is in a spot where it has to cope with virtually no water over the dry season so it's reasonably easy to control.

Excellent information. Especially about keeping it potted.  Thanks.

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12 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Good to know..  I had a single-flowered specimen for a couple years but lost it last summer. Not completely sure if it was the heat, or if something else had already weakened it and made dealing with the heat here more stressful. Definitely plan on replacing..  and not placing it anywhere that faces west, lol. Flowers are well worth the wait. Good luck with the Clock Vine.

That is really interesting! Mine has a western exposure and i haven't noticed issues with heat. I always thought it wasn't blooming because it wanted more exposure to sun. 

11 hours ago, tropicbreeze said:

Yes, some shade, extra water (but fast draining soil) and wind protection.

Rangoon Creeper is a tough plant. I found some at an abandoned mining camp where it's subject to a 5 month rainless hot period but still surviving after at least 50 years. Friends had some over an archway which flowered prolifically almost continuously. But it was a big job to keep it pruned back and stop the runners from spreading around so they eventually dug it out, with great difficulty. A good one to keep confined. Mine is in a spot where it has to cope with virtually no water over the dry season so it's reasonably easy to control.

Thanks for the information! very helpful. About thunbergia, i do remember the vine I saw in Guatemala city was growing on the underside of a school walkway so it was completely shaded except for perhaps morning sun. 

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1 hour ago, Jdiaz31089 said:

That is really interesting! Mine has a western exposure and i haven't noticed issues with heat. I always thought it wasn't blooming because it wanted more exposure to sun. 

Thanks for the information! very helpful. About thunbergia, i do remember the vine I saw in Guatemala city was growing on the underside of a school walkway so it was completely shaded except for perhaps morning sun. 

Yeah, I thought the same thing ( about the Rangoon Creeper).. remember though that our flavor of heat/ low humidity most of the summer is pretty extreme compared to most of CA., except maybe Death Valley or near the Co. River Delta. Afternoon shade makes all the difference, heat is plenty sufficient to trigger flowering, no matter what the exposure. 

If you can find one, ( and have any room) Chonemorpha penangensis is another one worst adding to your collection.  One ive had a few years did well back in San Jose, should do better there in Fresno ( likes more sustained heat) 

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The San Diego zoo has a good specimen of this vine. The yellow is relatively bright but the maroon color is fairly dull, the result being that the flowers are not very showy, at least not in this climate. But it does seem to always have a few flowers in bloom throughout the whole year.

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@tropicbreeze @Silas_Sancona @Hammer

Here is my little mysorensis. I planted it about two weeks ago and since then it's acclimated enough to show new growth. I'm looking forward to a lot of growth this summer. It's planted in a SW facing corner under the eaves of the house, at the foot of a monstrous bougainvillea which we prune to keep the foliage high up. I figured this is the spot that would be the driest during winter and is the most protected from wind. The bougainvillea will shade it while it's small, then I'll try training it on the ceiling of my porch where it'll get no direct sun. 

20170318_111312.thumb.jpg.076fc96e29ade3

20170318_111307.thumb.jpg.cbbdfa24ef7e82

20170318_113230.thumb.jpg.7a2b08f3c487d9

 

And regarding quisqualis, it drops some older foliage during winter but seems to never actually stop growing. Here it is this morning showing the nice bronze colored new growth. Maybe this year it'll bloom? This will be it's third summer.

1489861326490-177930607.thumb.jpg.244bf7

20170318_111208.thumb.jpg.77e93ad8651f1d

Edited by Jdiaz31089
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In south west florida it takes sun sun to bloom. any shade it stops the blooming

creeper copy.jpg

Edited by Johnk9
photo
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49 minutes ago, Johnk9 said:

In south west florida it takes full sun to bloom. any shade it stops the blooming

creeper copy.jpg

 

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