Unknown coco type in Phoenix area

9 posts in this topic

Only have had palm since early November from lowes. Looking for tips on repotting as roots are already coming out of the 1.75gal pot. Was going to get a 3 or so gal pot and miracle grow palm and cactus mix. I water with reverse osmosis water with around 23ppm. Also any tips on acclimating to more sun in spring. Also any members with firsthand experience in my climate for warm season care and long term once it out grows the house. Any help with palm identification would be appreciated.  Thanks in advance. 

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They do love drainage. I keep mine in sand...just like it would be if on the beach. Watch for spider mites close, they love these palms,

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8 hours ago, sashaeffer said:

They do love drainage. I keep mine in sand...just like it would be if on the beach. Watch for spider mites close, they love these palms,

That.

 You will also want to try and keep the humidity up inside too.  Say 50%.  The issue with coco's in dry climates is that they LOVE humidity.  Someone correct me if I am wrong by very dry climates are usually very hard on coco's from what I understand.   Maybe someone who knows better than I can chime in with more on that. 

As far as spider mites, keeping the humidity high will help some.  If you do get them though, I have found the best method to control  them without pesticides of any kind is simply to use forceful water and hose them off good and quick to minimize tap water in the crown. 

As for an ID on what type that is, well I would say its too young to tell.  Again, maybe someone knows more than me and can help.   I wish you much success with it!  Please keep us updated as to how it does!  Cheers!  Welcome aboard to PalmTalk!  If you love Palms you are in the right place for sure! 

 

 

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I wouldn't hurry to put in bigger pot right now. Once it warms up a bit in spring would be better to plant in ground or bigger pot. Just my two cents...

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Here's one I left in its original pot. I bought it last winter from HD. During summer I put an adjustable sprinkler line in there for a regular watering schedule. It's grown well since. Much better than my others actually. It gets watered twice daily with my lawn sprinkler schedules. Probably receives about a gallon or two a day. Even now that we are well into our cold season with nighly lows in the low 40's. 

I'm not saying to try this. Just saying this is what I'm doing with one of my potted coconuts right now. The ones I potted in bigger pots during summer I am not able to water as often because the newer soil will stay too wet and rot out my coconuts roots. I think I should have tried pure sand or something like it when I up potted them. 

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On ‎12‎/‎19‎/‎2016‎ ‎11‎:‎56‎:‎43‎, jayb said:

Only have had palm since early November from lowes. Looking for tips on repotting as roots are already coming out of the 1.75gal pot. Was going to get a 3 or so gal pot and miracle grow palm and cactus mix. I water with reverse osmosis water with around 23ppm. Also any tips on acclimating to more sun in spring. Also any members with firsthand experience in my climate for warm season care and long term once it out grows the house. Any help with palm identification would be appreciated.  Thanks in advance. 

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Jay,

Welcome to the forum.  I think it may be a Green Malayan Dwarf, since that it the most popular variety grown by the wholesale growers in the U.S.  Also, due to its narrow straight trunk, it looks like a Green Malayan Dwarf.  Anyway, I would second the suggestion to wait till spring to repot it.  Till then, put it in a sunny west or south facing window, watering it about once a week or once every 8 days or so.  They don't like chilly damp roots.  Put your finger at the bottom of the pot and feel how moist the soil is through one of the holes in the bottom of the pot.  If the soil feels damp, DON'T water it, but if it feels dry, then water it.  I would suggest using an all organic fertilizer, in a ratio like 8-4-6 or 6-2-4 with micronutrients.  I went all organic about 5 years ago, and all of my plants, including my palms are doing MUCH better than they ever did with any of the synthetic chemical fertilizers or pesticides.  Also, set it out on your patio on days when the high temp is at least 64F or 65F to let it get some more sun and fresh air, but don't leave it setting out on any nights that it is predicted to get below 35F or 36F, especially if it's been overwatered in the meantime.  Remember, they don't like chilly damp roots.  It's okay to leave it out for a night or two down in the 36F to 38F range, which I actually do with mine to help harden them up for planting in the ground the following spring, but don't let them it get exposed to any temps in a pot below 34F.

John

 

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I know that the Tempe area of phoenix can get frosts, but I didn't know a coconut palm could survive those kinds of lows, that's pretty impressive to be honest. I have plans of moving out there hopefully sooner than later. 

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That I know of I think we've only had one light frost this season so far. I keep it inside with a humidifier 50-75% average rh at 70-75 degrees. Plan on setting it outside when nights are similar temp. A little worried about the high temps and sunburn in summer. Heard they take the low humidity well enough. Currently it's growing like a weed but I think I maybe on borrowed time it's only getting about an hour of direct afternoon sun. Spring needs to hurry.

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On 12/23/2016, 12:58:38, jayb said:

That I know of I think we've only had one light frost this season so far. I keep it inside with a humidifier 50-75% average rh at 70-75 degrees. Plan on setting it outside when nights are similar temp. A little worried about the high temps and sunburn in summer. Heard they take the low humidity well enough. Currently it's growing like a weed but I think I maybe on borrowed time it's only getting about an hour of direct afternoon sun. Spring needs to hurry.

Sounds like you are doing good by it so far.   You know, I have seen people that were in like MN or even Canada that have had a coco in a pot for 20 years or so.  If they can manage that for that long, you know it can be done in warmer climates, so there is that.  Just do your best, and remember you have this whole community here to help you out.    Good luck and keep us updated!   Cheers :D

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Will do its currently growing like a weed its already almost doubled from when I first got it. Ended up repotting it with an organic palm and cactus mix. Still looking for tips on acclimating it to more direct sun and the much lower humidity come spring. I've heard it can take the low humidity just gets dry tips on leaves. In east Iowa were I used to live I never used to have to acclimate plants when moving outdoors. They just did better no matter what. In Arizona though is a whole new ball game. Backyard is south facing so I get all day full sun for half the other side is full shade but with light reflecting off the house.

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