Corona ca Coconut

186 posts in this topic

On 4/16/2018, 11:51:03, GottmitAlex said:

It's bewildering to see this coconut is not getting the same publicity and all the jazz the Newport coco had in its day.

The Newport coco struggled and suffered throughout its life. This Corona coco, in a Cali 9B usda hardiness zone (says it all) , look like it's thriving, under cali standards. 

 

THe Newport Coco was right next to one of the busiest streets in the world, while this one is tucked off in a residential 'hood.

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51 minutes ago, JubaeaMan138 said:

I would say Phoenix canariensis is the archetype for California

Maybe Washies, too.

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1 hour ago, DoomsDave said:

THe Newport Coco was right next to one of the busiest streets in the world, while this one is tucked off in a residential 'hood.

Good point.

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1 hour ago, DoomsDave said:

THe Newport Coco was right next to one of the busiest streets in the world, while this one is tucked off in a residential 'hood.

Good point.

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16 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Inland is key. Not too far, though. 

Apparently so. But that clip someone posted of Corona blanketed with snow bowled me over. I presume it has never snowed anywhere near Newport Beach. I think we've established that the coconut can handle a number of extremely low overnight temps, as long as it's compensated by good daytime highs. That La Quinta one proved that. I'm horrified that that bloke chopped it down.

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Unfortunately I can't crop the Corona palm image on this machine. So I'll post the full image. After that, I'll post two images of a yet unnamed variety of the species Beccario growing in the Sydney Gardens. Only seven years old, the first image is of the complete plant growing under a canopy of other trees. The next one is a close-up of the base of the palm. The base and trunk of this Beccario look very similar to the same of the Corona specimen.

I believe the Beccarios are the closest relos [relatives] of the Cocos. This is all in the interests of establishing that the Corona palm is a genuine Cocos. Because if it is, it has to be the world-record holder for not just distance from the equator, but also altitude and distance from the sea.

CoronaPalm.jpg

Beccario.JPG

Beccario2.JPG

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19 minutes ago, James West said:

Unfortunately I can't crop the Corona palm image on this machine. So I'll post the full image. After that, I'll post two images of a yet unnamed variety of the species Beccario growing in the Sydney Gardens. Only seven years old, the first image is of the complete plant growing under a canopy of other trees. The next one is a close-up of the base of the palm. The base and trunk of this Beccario look very similar to the same of the Corona specimen.

I believe the Beccarios are the closest relos [relatives] of the Cocos. This is all in the interests of establishing that the Corona palm is a genuine Cocos. Because if it is, it has to be the world-record holder for not just distance from the equator, but also altitude and distance from the sea.

CoronaPalm.jpg

Beccario.JPG

Beccario2.JPG

Hear, hear!

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4 hours ago, James West said:

Unfortunately I can't crop the Corona palm image on this machine. So I'll post the full image. After that, I'll post two images of a yet unnamed variety of the species Beccario growing in the Sydney Gardens. Only seven years old, the first image is of the complete plant growing under a canopy of other trees. The next one is a close-up of the base of the palm. The base and trunk of this Beccario look very similar to the same of the Corona specimen.

I believe the Beccarios are the closest relos [relatives] of the Cocos. This is all in the interests of establishing that the Corona palm is a genuine Cocos. Because if it is, it has to be the world-record holder for not just distance from the equator, but also altitude and distance from the sea.

CoronaPalm.jpg

Beccario.JPG

Beccario2.JPG

It's definitely a coconut! Those Beccariophoenix are B. fenestralis, by the way.

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17 hours ago, DoomsDave said:

THe Newport Coco was right next to one of the busiest streets in the world, while this one is tucked off in a residential 'hood.

Like playing for the Yankees versus Double A.

 

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11 hours ago, Zeeth said:

It's definitely a coconut! Those Beccariophoenix are B. fenestralis, by the way.

It would seem so [re the Corona palm]. I just like to be sure of things. That Beccariophoenix could be a fenestralis, but the plaque describes it as unclassified. This would be uninteresting if it were not for the fact that there is a clearly labelled, but different looking, fenestralis growing about ten yards away from it. I'll make further enquiries.

Switching tracks for a moment, the best Beccario specimen in the Sydney Gardens is this 7 year old Madagascariensis:

Beccario.JPG

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Posted (edited)

11 hours ago, Zeeth said:

It's definitely a coconut! Those Beccariophoenix are B. fenestralis, by the way.

Keith. By the small size of the base, no trunk, and the shape of the leaves (at that particular stage), it doesn't look like a Fenestralis. Either alfredii or mad...

Unless the picture is a bit deceiving, and that is a trunk with the leaf bases attached. ..

Edited by GottmitAlex
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1 hour ago, GottmitAlex said:

Keith. By the small size of the base, no trunk, and the shape of the leaves (at that particular stage), it doesn't look like a Fenestralis. Either alfredii or mad...

Unless the picture is a bit deceiving, and that is a trunk with the leaf bases attached. ..

It's definitely B. fenestralis. Leaf shape isn't right for the other 2 species, nor is the leaf base fiber. You'd expect B. madagascariensis to be more shuttlecock at this stage, with a darker green petiole base with stiffer leaf base fiber. B. alfredii would have a more purple color to the petioles towards the base and the leaflets should droop parallel to the rachis rather than perpendicular. 

You might be thrown off by the perceived lack of windows at this stage, but they lose them before reaching trunking stage. The other Beccariophoenix posted is also B. fenestralis, not B. mad.

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Zeeth said:

It's definitely B. fenestralis. Leaf shape isn't right for the other 2 species, nor is the leaf base fiber. You'd expect B. madagascariensis to be more shuttlecock at this stage, with a darker green petiole base with stiffer leaf base fiber. B. alfredii would have a more purple color to the petioles towards the base and the leaflets should droop parallel to the rachis rather than perpendicular. 

You might be thrown off by the perceived lack of windows at this stage, but they lose them before reaching trunking stage. The other Beccariophoenix posted is also B. fenestralis, not B. mad.

So they're  more Fenestralis than Madagacariensis? Logical. However, I still think by the pucs, they are B. Mad.  Well, I guess we'll find out soon enough. 

Edited by GottmitAlex
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Keith is correct; the juvenile Beccies are fenestralis as is the larger one labeled madagascariensis. Up until 5-6 years ago everyone referred to the "windows" type as madagascariensis. Turns out that the original description of B. Mad was actually the "no windows" version. So there's still a lot of tags out there that are not updated.. Returning to topic, Cocos in Corona, now that's cool.

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2 hours ago, quaman58 said:

Keith is correct; the juvenile Beccies are fenestralis as is the larger one labeled madagascariensis. Up until 5-6 years ago everyone referred to the "windows" type as madagascariensis. Turns out that the original description of B. Mad was actually the "no windows" version. So there's still a lot of tags out there that are not updated.. Returning to topic, Cocos in Corona, now that's cool.

That's interesting info, and it makes sense. "Madagascariensis" was probably an early generic term for any of the Beccarios. The Corona specimen is really a phenomenon. Below I'll post an early morning pic of the two Golden Malay Dwarfs in the Sydney Botanic Gardens I took yesterday. Coincidentally, they are at the same distance from the equator as the Corona number - 33 degrees 52 seconds.

Sydney Malay Golden.jpg

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On 5/5/2018, 4:26:32, Zeeth said:

It's definitely B. fenestralis. Leaf shape isn't right for the other 2 species, nor is the leaf base fiber. You'd expect B. madagascariensis to be more shuttlecock at this stage, with a darker green petiole base with stiffer leaf base fiber. B. alfredii would have a more purple color to the petioles towards the base and the leaflets should droop parallel to the rachis rather than perpendicular. 

You might be thrown off by the perceived lack of windows at this stage, but they lose them before reaching trunking stage. The other Beccariophoenix posted is also B. fenestralis, not B. mad.

You're absolutely right Keith. The Alfie and mad are, as you say shuttlecocked. Very straight and pointed leaflets. 

Checking my fenestralis, I see the resemblance. Sort of a horizontal plane for a couple inches from the rachis, then the leaflets curve downwards. 

20180507_142334-2656x1494.jpg

20180507_142344-2656x1494.jpg

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Posted (edited)

I know what you might say: "Alex, having an aforementioned palm, you can't tell the difference?"

Honestly,  I haven't invested much thought into it. Being a Fenestralis or an alfredii, to me, they're both Uber bulletproof (in my region). Unlike my 5 cocos, I don't have any special heat lamps on 'em. I can fill then with "cold" water all day, and they'll still keep growing.   Pinnate, but sloooow, versions of a Washingtonia robusta. Here again, in my region. Thought they were the same, except for the windows when young... thanks Keith. I learned my lesson.

Edited by GottmitAlex
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52 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

I know what you might say: "Alex, having an aforementioned palm, you can't tell the difference?"

Honestly,  I haven't invested much thought into it. Being a Fenestralis or an alfredii, to me, they're both Uber bulletproof (in my region). Unlike my 5 cocos, I don't have any special heat lamps on 'em. I can fill then with "cold" water all day, and they'll still keep growing.   Pinnate, but sloooow, versions of a Washingtonia robusta. Here again, in my region. Thought they were the same, except for the windows when young... thanks Keith. I learned my lesson.

I want to thank all you guys for your interest and postings. Working this week, but I'll post some close-ups of the leaves of these palms and clear images of the plaques that the Garden minders have attached to them. There are several "unknown" species from Madagascar which are Cocos related. It will also be interesting to see if the Golden Malay Dwarves can handle our winter. . . if it ever gets here. . .

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On 11/26/2016, 12:18:43, Josh-O said:

Dave you nailed it by pointing it is south facing surrounded by all that concrete.

I bet if there was no concrete to keep the ambient air temp warm after dark it would be a dead coconut.

Radiational heat seems to be the only way to keep a coconut alive in So cal.

Look what happened to the Newport coco when it grew away from the wall..:crying:

It was the palm tree next to it that starved it of water which eventually killed it not growing away from the wall

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41 minutes ago, veeman55 said:

It was the palm tree next to it that starved it of water which eventually killed it not growing away from the wall

I beg to differ there. I have had Washingtonias alonside my cocos in a very narrow garden sliver. In fact, the largest Washie I had (I decapitated it late March) had 14ft. Of clear trunk (hence the reason for its decapitation, I could see the writing on the wall with that palm genus. It harbors pests if one lets it keep a skirt) But I digress, the point is, my most largest and fadtest growing coconut is the one by that Washie. (Now a 14ft stump).

So that theory, to me, goes out the window.  The Newport coco had its days numbered since it was planted. I imagine its life support was the pavement and the heat generated by motor vehicles passing by.

 

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I went down and looked after the Newport coconut toward the end of its days. From what I could tell, it was receiving little to no irrigation. It may be a combination of things but I’d guess at that size that was the overriding factor. 

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Posted (edited)

5 hours ago, Matt in OC said:

I went down and looked after the Newport coconut toward the end of its days. From what I could tell, it was receiving little to no irrigation. It may be a combination of things but I’d guess at that size that was the overriding factor. 

Alex so i was right in a way.

Matt it was hurting for water wasnt it. That palm next to it didnt help i bet. That dry weather washingtonia isnt a good neighbour to have so close to a water loving palm.

 

Edited by veeman55
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Posted (edited)

That's a great coconut and glad to see it doing well. As another 9b person trying to grow a coconut I understand the challenges. Hope it continues to do well. While it may be in a good microclimate now, unfortunately it will likely have issues when the fronds and meristem get above the roof line. The crown will not survive more than a few hours in the upper 20s. Then the question will be how fast can it recover in that climate before the next winter. But it looks nice now!

Edited by pj_orlando_z9b
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Posted (edited)

On 4/15/2018, 6:02:57, pin38 said:

https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/567-Viewpointe-Cir_Corona_CA_92881_M22411-58332#photo33

Hope I'm not breaking any bylaws, here's the listing. "Great curb appeal with palm trees in the front". AKA possibly a world record for northernmost surviving coconut. Maybe someone buy it as an income property and water it? I'll throw in a Home Depot gift card...

Heck, the realtor.com listing doesn't even have "cocos nucifera" in the description. I'll bet that would add at least $15,000 to the price :D

Intereresting; I just pulled up this address on Google street view, and for some reason it's giving me imagery from 2011, when this tree was just a toddler. Maybe this will help someone estimate its age, rate of growth, remaining years to maturity, etc.

edit: ah, I see someone already did this on page 2. Anyway, I'm glad I know the address, now. I'm in that area a few times a year, so I'll definitely make a pilgrimage.

CoronaCoconutGSV2011.jpg

Edited by TheWaterbug
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On 06/05/2018, 10:56:01, GottmitAlex said:

So they're  more Fenestralis than Madagacariensis? Logical. However, I still think by the pucs, they are B. Mad.  Well, I guess we'll find out soon enough. 

Zeeth

I presume you're right. As fenestram is latin for window, I take it that the names comes from the strip that runs along the tips of the sprouting leaf. Here's a close-up:

Beccario.jpg

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