Corona ca Coconut

155 posts in this topic

Yes we did have snow as I mentioned before back in 2012 /2013ish each year corona sees freezing nights every year few times a year.

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I thought downtown LA with all the concrete would be a better place for a coconut than out near the beach. 

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On 1/3/2018, 1:19:38, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Internet search says Okinawa is as north as they grow in Japan, which is only 26 degrees. So looks like Corona wins. 

All islands south of the Okinawian main island are good to grow cocos nucifera - naturally growing is a different topic but I have 

found a spot (here on Miyako) where dropped coconuts sprouted and grow very well - while the main island of Okinawa is 

a different story. It seems that you may grow Cocos nucifera in the southern part, the northern part with it`s lower winter

tops looks like an NG for this species. I have never checked out the main island for it`s C.n.-potential seriously, but surely 

one day I will!

best regards from Miyako -

Lars

 

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This is the area that I believe is likely to have the most success with Cocos nucifera. Not directly on the coast, notwithstanding the Newport Beach coconut exception. The marine climate does not allow enough heat. The desert climate of La Quinta, Ca. has plenty of heat but the cold low temperatures that repeat in the teens every so often are simply too much with some exceptions.

The fertile ground would seem to fall in that area of So. Ca. deemed Sunset 23. This area seems to have the necessary heat component lacking in the Beach/Marine climate but does not experience the once in a 10 year 18 F. that Cocos nucifera cannot tolerate. Looks like Corona fits that requirement!

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Corona lies along the Santa Ana river and can record some of the coldest minimums in low elevation SoCal  

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Malibu for long term success,and Palm Springs for a coco that will grow happily for 10-15 years!!

Somebody has to try it.

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Was in the neighborhood yesterday snapped this picture. This thing is still looking good . The home is for sale and seems as if the house is abandoned now

IMG_3174.JPG

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Maybe PalmTalk should buy this house.

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That coconut looks WAY better than that poor palm to the left.  I can't even tell what it is from this picture.

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3 hours ago, awkonradi said:

Maybe PalmTalk should buy this house.

I agree!!!

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Let's hope the new owner will not cut it down like the other big coconut in California. It really looks great! Maybe they keep watering this palm.

By looking at the trunk, the ravenea rivularis on the left will probably not make it.

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That’s a great looking coconut, the fronds look nice, green and healthy. Please excuse my ignorance, are the winds you have there strong and drying? The reason I ask is that our easterly winds here in Perth blow strongly and are very drying as they blow from across the desert when they come. We generally have westerlies blowing from across the ocean or southerlies. I would be really interested to see pics of this palm at the end of winter just to see how it holds up with no protection. It’s looking very nice now, I’d be happy with it!

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Posted (edited)

https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/567-Viewpointe-Cir_Corona_CA_92881_M22411-58332#photo33

Hope I'm not breaking any bylaws, here's the listing. "Great curb appeal with palm trees in the front". AKA possibly a world record for northernmost surviving coconut. Maybe someone buy it as an income property and water it? I'll throw in a Home Depot gift card...

Edited by pin38
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How the heck did you pull up the adress nuts

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Posted (edited)

Deo gratias! Up for sale. It'd relatively inexpensive considering they have a mature Coconut palm in the front yard. LOL.

This feat is, in snowy  Corona,  next to impossible.

 

Cali 9B... Lord have mercy!  How have they accomplished this?  "Natural selection"?

Edited by GottmitAlex
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On April 14, 2018 at 9:18:00 PM, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

That coconut looks WAY better than that poor palm to the left.  I can't even tell what it is from this picture.

That poor hacked up palm is a Ravenea rivularis (Magesty palm). I imagine the owners or yard maintenance people cut the fronds because they were hitting the house. 

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15 hours ago, JubaeaMan138 said:

How the heck did you pull up the adress nuts

I sell homes and spend a lot of time looking at listings. Typed in 'Corona, CA' and skimmed about 8 pages before finding it. I swear I'm not a stalker!

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It's bewildering to see this coconut is not getting the same publicity and all the jazz the Newport coco had in its day.

The Newport coco struggled and suffered throughout its life. This Corona coco, in a Cali 9B usda hardiness zone (says it all) , look like it's thriving, under cali standards. 

 

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17 hours ago, JubaeaMan138 said:

How the heck did you pull up the adress nuts

Even without the now-published real-estate listing, it's easy to find. It took me about 20 minutes using Google maps and Street View back in Nov 2016 after you first posted it.

Note that the sidewalk goes directly against the street curb (no easement). So this eliminates the majority of neighborhoods in Corona where there is a strip of lawn in between, which is easy to see in satellite view. Then look at the remaining neighborhoods in Street View and eliminate by tract building style. Then eliminate north-facing properties, look at the shape of the house, the concrete pad, and the red brick walkway on the side, and you'll find it. No address needed.

hNB2gvz.jpg

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:greenthumb:

 

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If the original coconut owner, be it accidentally or purposefully,  planted the "big box store" palm where it is, taking in consideration no obvious supplemental heat source, then we can conclude the "secret recipe" to grow a coconut in our latitude is 1.5ftx1.5ft plot sorrounded by cement, in front a south facing wall. 

That's it. No tarps, no heating cables, no heat lamps, no led/brood lamps.... just cement and a south facing wall.....

Well, the "secret" is out dear friends.

 

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Posted (edited)

Either the aforementioned scenario, or the palm in question is not a Cocos Nucifera....

 

 

9b. I am still beside myself.

Am I missing something?

 

Edited by GottmitAlex
Question
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Definetly coco I'm not to familiar with them can't say i've seen a large cocos in person but i've never seen this type of

palm anywhere in California . This street has a lot of Ravenea rivularis that is also one to the left . Pretty Palm but still don't get the coconut hype pretty plain looking plant in my opinion .

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36 minutes ago, JubaeaMan138 said:

Definetly coco I'm not to familiar with them can't say i've seen a large cocos in person but i've never seen this type of

palm anywhere in California . This street has a lot of Ravenea rivularis that is also one to the left . Pretty Palm but still don't get the coconut hype pretty plain looking plant in my opinion .

You kiddin'?  The cocos nucifera is the king of Palms. Hands down.  Dwarf or tal,  it is the quintessential palm. We all search for palms which mimic its attributes. Especially its main attraction: Gracefullness

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23 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Deo gratias! Up for sale. It'd relatively inexpensive considering they have a mature Coconut palm in the front yard. LOL.

This feat is, in snowy  Corona,  next to impossible.

 

Cali 9B... Lord have mercy!  How have they accomplished this?  "Natural selection"?

I GOT DIBS ON THE FIRST VIABLE NUTS, LOL!!!

John

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How far away from fruiting would you say a Palm of this size is?

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Posted (edited)

52 minutes ago, JubaeaMan138 said:

How far away from fruiting would you say a Palm of this size is?

Usually a tall variety, which I believe this to be(if it in fact is a coco)  takes 8- 10 years. It should put out flowers here shortly. Even if it aborts the fruit due to the cold, it is quite an achievement.

Edited by GottmitAlex
Typo
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My grandfather lives on that street so I will be checking it often

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I am a bit worried that it won't get enough water if the house is vacant. The grass out front looks pretty dry. It'd be sad to see it go the way of the Salton Sea coconuts. 

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8 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

It's bewildering to see this coconut is not getting the same publicity and all the jazz the Newport coco had in its day.

The Newport coco struggled and suffered throughout its life. This Corona coco, in a Cali 9B usda hardiness zone (says it all) , look like it's thriving, under cali standards. 

 

Maybe they are growing it ALL ORGANICALLY!  When you do that, you can literally increase the cold hardiness of tropical trees and plants by as much as 2F or 3F, which doesn't sound like much to some people, but it literally MAKES A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE for those of us who grow tender tropicals in marginal areas!

John

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3 minutes ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Maybe they are growing it ALL ORGANICALLY!  When you do that, you can literally increase the cold hardiness of tropical trees and plants by as much as 2F or 3F, which doesn't sound like much to some people, but it literally MAKES A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE for those of us who grow tender tropicals in marginal areas!

John

Could you please clarify on your interpretation of "all organic"?

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2 hours ago, JubaeaMan138 said:

How far away from fruiting would you say a Palm of this size is?

In South Florida or the Rio Grande Valley, it would most likely just be a year or two away from producing its first fruits, but in the chillier winter conditions of California, it may take another 4 years to start producing a few small nuts.

John

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52 minutes ago, Jesse said:

Could you please clarify on your interpretation of "all organic"?

Certainly, it involves cutting out the use of ALL synthetic chemical fertilizers, synthetic chemical herbicides, like Round Up (which is horribly dangerous for its users and for the environment- it has been linked to lymphoma and all sorts of other horrible health problems), and synthetic pesticides.  It involves the use of ONLY organic and natural fertilizers like MicroLife (which is what I use), Lady Bug, Espoma, some of the Medina products, etc.  For herbicides, use only a 10% natural horticultural vinegar solution or similar product, and for pest control, use only things like Insecticidal Soap for Organic Gardening and Bonide Copper Fungicide for Organic Gardening.

John

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3 hours ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Maybe they are growing it ALL ORGANICALLY!  When you do that, you can literally increase the cold hardiness of tropical trees and plants by as much as 2F or 3F, which doesn't sound like much to some people, but it literally MAKES A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE for those of us who grow tender tropicals in marginal areas!

John

John, my friend... you just opened up a can of worms. (Pandora's box as it were)

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18 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

John, my friend... you just opened up a can of worms. (Pandora's box as it were)

Thanks!  I aim to please!!!

John

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