My Seed Germination Station....Thing...

7 posts in this topic

Here is my little area on my deck that I germinate seeds in, I simply put the seeds in a small pot, water them, and let them germinate and sprout in the pot. Right now I am germinating four Needle Palms (to the left) and three Sabal palmetto (to the right). I say there because I dig one little sprout up. One is also just now starting to come up! I had the Sabal palmettos their for a few weeks and the Needle Palms I just potted up today. 

 

IMG_1824.JPG

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How long does it takes for ur sabal palmettos? 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just so you know, if you don't remove the outer shell on the need palm seed they will take years if ever to sprout.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Laaz said:

Just so you know, if you don't remove the outer shell on the need palm seed they will take years if ever to sprout.

I did remove the outer shells, I wouldn't want to slow down the process!

 

2 hours ago, Latinmtl67 said:

How long does it takes for ur sabal palmettos? 

 

It took one with a small root already coming out a good 2 weeks for the sprout to pop up, if it is just the seed it can take anywhere from 2 weeks - about 3 months. You have to give them heat too.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

okay perfect 
Thank you 
so far i wasnt able to make it germinated its been a week and a half 
so now i wont worry and wait a lil more

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use this method with good germination results:

  1. Get an aquarium, a heating pad, some potting soil, some perlite, a few towels, a thermometer, and some toothpicks.
  2. Put the heating pad in the bottom of the aquarium.
  3. Mix up the potting soil and perlite, and lay the mix on top of the heating pad.
  4. Put the seeds in the planting medium approximately 1 inch deep.
  5. Mark the planting area with a toothpick so the seed will be easy to find/check.
  6. Turn on the heating pad.
  7. Place the thermometer in the aquarium.
  8. Place the towels over top of the aquarium.
  9. The heating pad will shut off after a certain time, so check the temperature in the aquarium, and turn it on if the temperature is below 85F.
  10. If you need to water the soil, you can do so using a medicine dropper or a straw to avoid overwatering the planting medium.  The dropper is self explanatory.  For the straw:
  • Fill a tall cup or a bucket with water. 
  • Put the straw down in to the water and put your thumb on top to trap the water in the straw. 
  • Put the straw over the area where there is a seed, and take your thumb off.

I've used this method on:

  • Phoenix Dactylifera
  • Phoenix Theophrasti
  • Sabal Palmetto

I typically get 70-80% germination.  Only downside is that you have to be judicious in checking the seeds after week 2 for these varieties, and then each week thereafter for straglers, and be ready to pot them.  This method is basically a modification on the baggy method that I used when I lived in PA, so it may help others in cold climates.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/17/2016, 7:59:19, kinzyjr said:

I use this method with good germination results:

  1. Get an aquarium, a heating pad, some potting soil, some perlite, a few towels, a thermometer, and some toothpicks.
  2. Put the heating pad in the bottom of the aquarium.
  3. Mix up the potting soil and perlite, and lay the mix on top of the heating pad.
  4. Put the seeds in the planting medium approximately 1 inch deep.
  5. Mark the planting area with a toothpick so the seed will be easy to find/check.
  6. Turn on the heating pad.
  7. Place the thermometer in the aquarium.
  8. Place the towels over top of the aquarium.
  9. The heating pad will shut off after a certain time, so check the temperature in the aquarium, and turn it on if the temperature is below 85F.
  10. If you need to water the soil, you can do so using a medicine dropper or a straw to avoid overwatering the planting medium.  The dropper is self explanatory.  For the straw:
  • Fill a tall cup or a bucket with water. 
  • Put the straw down in to the water and put your thumb on top to trap the water in the straw. 
  • Put the straw over the area where there is a seed, and take your thumb off.

I've used this method on:

  • Phoenix Dactylifera
  • Phoenix Theophrasti
  • Sabal Palmetto

I typically get 70-80% germination.  Only downside is that you have to be judicious in checking the seeds after week 2 for these varieties, and then each week thereafter for straglers, and be ready to pot them.  This method is basically a modification on the baggy method that I used when I lived in PA, so it may help others in cold climates.

Cool method!

Edited by PalmTreeDude
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • Sabal minor At Their Range Limits?
      By PalmTreeDude
      Anyone have any pictures of native Sabal minor at just about their fattest northern ranges? I want to see more Sabal minors at their limits, inspired by this awesome thread: http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/52756-sabal-minor-in-habitat-mccurtain-county-ok/
    • Cold Hardy Hybrids
      By topwater
      I've never been a big fan of hybrid palms, they just make me think of Frankenpalm, freaks of nature. However, I've been knocked out by some of the pics of hybrids on PT.  I'm old, my question is, what hybrid does PT think would be the fastest grower in coastal 9b Texas, very hot and humid with two months of ridiculous cold, 32f average, but occasional lows into the mid twenties.  I intend to live forever. So far, so good.
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
    • Starting Some More Seeds
      By PalmTreeDude
      I am starting some seeds, I am finally using a peat moss and perlite mix. I am going to try and germinate Sabal palmetto (old seed) and Medjool Date Palms. They are not as wet as they look, the soild is just damp, but the heat from my heat mat makes it look like there is too much water. 


    • Spear pull victim: B. Odorata
      By Advective
      B. Odorata in the ground for two years. About 5.5ft tall.
      The plant saw lows this winter of 12ºF and 14-15ºF twice. A few days ago I noticed some of the newest growth had died but it didn't alarm me at the time because the same had happened to the S. Mexicana.
      When I took a closer look today, I noticed the new growth was dead all the way down to the base, in stark contrast to the Sabal. I gave a tug and the two newest fronds came out:

      Leaving this bottomless pit:

      Is there anything I can attempt like Hydrogen Peroxide or the partial beheading surgery? Does this look like damage induced by cold temperatures or cold rain? It saw no ice or snow this winter as I wrapped it for those events but it did see cold rain.
      This comes as a total shock as the plant otherwise took minimal damage

    • Seed Germination Question
      By PalmTreeDude
      Hello, I have a question. So, I normally use just plain old dirt to germinate seeds, but now I want to use some peat moss. BUT, I do not have any perlite. I never used perlite before in germinating palms and they still seem to germinate fine, but I heard a peat moss and perlite mix is great for germinating seed. Could I just use the peat moss? Will it still work about the same? Here is what I am wanting to just use. The reason I ask this is because I won't be able to get any perlite for awhile.