My Seed Germination Station....Thing...

7 posts in this topic

Here is my little area on my deck that I germinate seeds in, I simply put the seeds in a small pot, water them, and let them germinate and sprout in the pot. Right now I am germinating four Needle Palms (to the left) and three Sabal palmetto (to the right). I say there because I dig one little sprout up. One is also just now starting to come up! I had the Sabal palmettos their for a few weeks and the Needle Palms I just potted up today. 

 

IMG_1824.JPG

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How long does it takes for ur sabal palmettos? 

 

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Just so you know, if you don't remove the outer shell on the need palm seed they will take years if ever to sprout.

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1 hour ago, Laaz said:

Just so you know, if you don't remove the outer shell on the need palm seed they will take years if ever to sprout.

I did remove the outer shells, I wouldn't want to slow down the process!

 

2 hours ago, Latinmtl67 said:

How long does it takes for ur sabal palmettos? 

 

It took one with a small root already coming out a good 2 weeks for the sprout to pop up, if it is just the seed it can take anywhere from 2 weeks - about 3 months. You have to give them heat too.

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okay perfect 
Thank you 
so far i wasnt able to make it germinated its been a week and a half 
so now i wont worry and wait a lil more

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I use this method with good germination results:

  1. Get an aquarium, a heating pad, some potting soil, some perlite, a few towels, a thermometer, and some toothpicks.
  2. Put the heating pad in the bottom of the aquarium.
  3. Mix up the potting soil and perlite, and lay the mix on top of the heating pad.
  4. Put the seeds in the planting medium approximately 1 inch deep.
  5. Mark the planting area with a toothpick so the seed will be easy to find/check.
  6. Turn on the heating pad.
  7. Place the thermometer in the aquarium.
  8. Place the towels over top of the aquarium.
  9. The heating pad will shut off after a certain time, so check the temperature in the aquarium, and turn it on if the temperature is below 85F.
  10. If you need to water the soil, you can do so using a medicine dropper or a straw to avoid overwatering the planting medium.  The dropper is self explanatory.  For the straw:
  • Fill a tall cup or a bucket with water. 
  • Put the straw down in to the water and put your thumb on top to trap the water in the straw. 
  • Put the straw over the area where there is a seed, and take your thumb off.

I've used this method on:

  • Phoenix Dactylifera
  • Phoenix Theophrasti
  • Sabal Palmetto

I typically get 70-80% germination.  Only downside is that you have to be judicious in checking the seeds after week 2 for these varieties, and then each week thereafter for straglers, and be ready to pot them.  This method is basically a modification on the baggy method that I used when I lived in PA, so it may help others in cold climates.

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On 12/17/2016, 7:59:19, kinzyjr said:

I use this method with good germination results:

  1. Get an aquarium, a heating pad, some potting soil, some perlite, a few towels, a thermometer, and some toothpicks.
  2. Put the heating pad in the bottom of the aquarium.
  3. Mix up the potting soil and perlite, and lay the mix on top of the heating pad.
  4. Put the seeds in the planting medium approximately 1 inch deep.
  5. Mark the planting area with a toothpick so the seed will be easy to find/check.
  6. Turn on the heating pad.
  7. Place the thermometer in the aquarium.
  8. Place the towels over top of the aquarium.
  9. The heating pad will shut off after a certain time, so check the temperature in the aquarium, and turn it on if the temperature is below 85F.
  10. If you need to water the soil, you can do so using a medicine dropper or a straw to avoid overwatering the planting medium.  The dropper is self explanatory.  For the straw:
  • Fill a tall cup or a bucket with water. 
  • Put the straw down in to the water and put your thumb on top to trap the water in the straw. 
  • Put the straw over the area where there is a seed, and take your thumb off.

I've used this method on:

  • Phoenix Dactylifera
  • Phoenix Theophrasti
  • Sabal Palmetto

I typically get 70-80% germination.  Only downside is that you have to be judicious in checking the seeds after week 2 for these varieties, and then each week thereafter for straglers, and be ready to pot them.  This method is basically a modification on the baggy method that I used when I lived in PA, so it may help others in cold climates.

Cool method!

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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