31 posts in this topic

Where is the Phoenix canariensis most northern(ly) found in the USA? I saw some in Charleston, S.C. and that is as far north (on the east coast) I have evern seen them, what about the west coast? And has anyone ever seen one more north than Charleston on the east coast? I have been wondering where these things start to come up. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The furthest north on the west coast is around Brookings, Oregon. On the east coast I thought I saw a thread that showed them in the Myrtle Beach area. As I recall they were hard hit by a cold winter and took a beating, so they may not be viable in the long term there.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

North Myrtle beach, S.C:

http://www.garysnursery.com/Phoenix.html

When I used to live in Murrells Inlet I would  occasionally drive by and visit those. 

Here's one near Garden city beach that I use to jog by: image.thumb.png.78b926f1ed636c7e1d9fe3c9

Pheonix canarienensis burn back in the winter and struggle in the long term in these locations (zone 8b). I'd say the safest place on the east coast for Canary Island date palms would be Charleston (zone 9a). Theres a few monster specimens  there. 

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright. Here is one at Hilton Head Island, S.C. That I heard does great.

image.png

Edited by PalmTreeDude
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a huge one in Charleston:

image.thumb.png.8e3389663114691d2f36a05f

and another: image.thumb.png.00881c143ffc3fa3c0750d6f

image.thumb.png.4d122054a154dbdf31b016cc

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are massive CIDP's in the historic district of downtown Charleston.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They can be grown in the Brookings area in Southern Coastal Oregon.  I even saw citrus there and an Avocado tree.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not the USA, but I saw one in London, UK.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/29/2016, 10:12:45, PalmTreeDude said:

Where is the Phoenix canariensis most northern(ly) found in the USA? I saw some in Charleston, S.C. and that is as far north (on the east coast) I have evern seen them, what about the west coast? And has anyone ever seen one more north than Charleston on the east coast? I have been wondering where these things start to come up. 

ive seen some in southern north carolina

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The largest one I know of in NC, is in Southport at a former garden center.  I have seen it here since 2007 (also as far back as the street view goes).  I would guess it was planted there as a larger specimen.  It does look crappy after a really cold winter, but will pull through and have a decent canopy by the end of the summer.  The garden center is out of business now so who knows what will happen to it.  There seems to be a recent wave of dislike for landscape palms here unless they are at beach homes.     

google maps CIDP Southport NC

There are several yet to be trunking CIDPs in commercial landscaping here in SE NC.  One was in a hooters parking lot, that I think would have become a monster.  It did suffer some winter damage but survived.  it was removed (last year?) when it started to swallow up a couple parking spaces.

Also, there are some not yet trunked individuals planted at houses along the waterway that have been there for several years and seem to keep pulling out of the winter damage.  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think they would do alright in extreme south eastern N.C. But I wouldn't plant one their because I would not consider it long term. They are a zone 8b palm overall. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Tyrone said:

Not the USA, but I saw one in London, UK.

They will do great in coastal South eastern and western U.S. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found very nice ones in French Britain.  Same climate than southern UK.  I took seeds from them and they are coming out very well here in Congo, africa. Adaptability seems to be good...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/19/2016, 4:13:03, Tyrone said:

Not the USA, but I saw one in London, UK.

I've seen the pictures, some on Palm Talk.

Bet they'll grow in Northern Ireland and that place in Norway where you can grow aloes 100 miles south of the Arctic Circle.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best looking cidps in the country are in southern California all the way up to Sacramento IMO.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Reliably (East Coast) - Myrtle Beach, SC. Does anyone know there are CIDP in Charleston, SC that are very different than a regular Canary and it was grown from a 80 year old mother tree in Charleston, South Carolina. I call it CIDP-Carlopolis. They have much softer and darker fronds and are not as piercing sharp, and more glossy fronds. Strangely they seem to be more cold tolerant. I would like to get their seeds if anyone from Charleston area can offer.

Edited by SoulofthePlace
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are a few here in Wilmington, NC.  They generally get killed, but some have survived for a long time.  For example, there is one at the Checker's in Wilmington that survived a week of lows between 10-12 degrees this last January.  There are a handful here and there at beaches (I know of one at Kure Beach and a couple at Holden Beach and Ocean Isle Beach).  They're a rare sight, though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the best specimens I have seen(big crowns and fat trunks) were in the SF bay area, definitely better than the florida ones.  Here is one in berkeley CA.

CIDPBerkeley.PNG

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just to add heres some in brunswick georgia these must be 100 years old

NOT MY PICS

 

 

37554951_1038871892937674_1640942549503836160_n.jpg

37414766_1038872156270981_398807642081853440_n.jpg

37378028_1038872022937661_8868485825558478848_n.jpg

37679215_1043392935818903_6144103420195241984_n.jpg

37655374_1043393955818801_6462748499879395328_n.jpg

37728325_1043392585818938_2230217212180824064_n.jpg

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres a survivor from last winter in north carolina atlantic beach.  also not my pic

37597967_10155528453832483_570610092018237440_n.jpg

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the same palm before the winter

26196292_10155097061167483_1638011274184

another CIDP before and after the winter at the same beach

26195985_10155097060257483_3399426668612

after

27459545_10155145398342483_7937570063087

more carnage plus some washies27073266_10155145379347483_6979594837870

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a theory that 100% pure Phoenix canariensis is more cold hardy that many of the "mutts" sold as P. canariensis. Can anyone verify this?  I wonder if that accounts for the above pictures in Georgia where old specimens (that probably came from more pure sources in the early 1900's or before) apparently survived the recent very cold winter (upper teens?) with hardly any leaf damage. With upper teens in NW FL most P. canariensis I observed (which appeared to not be the pure species) had terrible damage with some even close to death.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well CIDP is not the most cold hardy phoenix. Some species are more cold hardy. CIDP is better (than some) in wet + cold conditions. While some other species are better in dry + cold. Hybrids can be more cold hardy than pure CIDP. Moderate frost will burn pure CIDP. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Opal92 said:

I have a theory that 100% pure Phoenix canariensis is more cold hardy that many of the "mutts" sold as P. canariensis. Can anyone verify this?  I wonder if that accounts for the above pictures in Georgia where old specimens (that probably came from more pure sources in the early 1900's or before) apparently survived the recent very cold winter (upper teens?) with hardly any leaf damage. With upper teens in NW FL most P. canariensis I observed (which appeared to not be the pure species) had terrible damage with some even close to death.

that could be true.  also coastal georgia is overall warmer then the panhandle. queens survived in georgia and there are some that have been there for 10-20 years. even charleston sc is technically a zone 9a while parts of the panhandle are 8b.   

heres 3 pics from SSI georgia of queens, everglades palm and some kind of livistonia.

37282165_1036401219851408_1339200652915537423058_1038465722978291_37771158263315

 

37323258_1037736139717916_30386336991438

a charelston CIDP that faired well after 2017

35168704_10155436601172483_6058813452825

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

just to add heres some in brunswick georgia these must be 100 years old

NOT MY PICS

 

 

37554951_1038871892937674_1640942549503836160_n.jpg

37414766_1038872156270981_398807642081853440_n.jpg

37378028_1038872022937661_8868485825558478848_n.jpg

37679215_1043392935818903_6144103420195241984_n.jpg

37655374_1043393955818801_6462748499879395328_n.jpg

37728325_1043392585818938_2230217212180824064_n.jpg

Those look awesome! I have seen some that look as healthy as those but just not as tall on Hilton Head Island S.C. Also last time I was at Hilton Head they seemed to be planted at every street corner. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the east coast, the northernmost CIDPs have to at least be on Hatteras Island. When I was there last December I remember seeing a bunch. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may have found your answer for long term survival.  while charelston seems to have the largest and oldest CIDP in the state, it seems there are a few old ones even north of that. This CIDP is in Myrtle beach South carolina and seems to be the oldest in the area and probably horry and georgetown county.  this picture was taken in 2016.  take a gander at the glory of the northernmost long term CIDP.

12036469_10153526989657483_8174664496135

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I lived there for 8 years and I've never seen it. Where is it located? 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/29/2018, 9:56:07, NC_Palms said:

On the east coast, the northernmost CIDPs have to at least be on Hatteras Island. When I was there last December I remember seeing a bunch. 

I have found 1 in hatteras that seems to be quite old for the area.  streetview and a pic.

https://www.google.com/maps/@35.2115088,-75.6889488,3a,75y,7.12h,81.95t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1szMDe9g2fZZxrt4LUWsswtA!2e0!7i3328!8i1664

b7163d2a905776716a87faf22e21e0del-m21xd-

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

I have found 1 in hatteras that seems to be quite old for the area.  streetview and a pic.

https://www.google.com/maps/@35.2115088,-75.6889488,3a,75y,7.12h,81.95t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1szMDe9g2fZZxrt4LUWsswtA!2e0!7i3328!8i1664

b7163d2a905776716a87faf22e21e0del-m21xd-

 

 

I could be very wrong but it seems like CIDP is a well-suited palm for the zone 8b regions of the Outer Banks. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • Naturalized Florida Coconut(?)
      By PalmTreeDude
      I believe this is naturalized, I found this when looking around on street view in inland South Florida. https://www.google.com/maps/@25.7612804,-80.8995018,3a,62.5y,351.69h,94.44t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sHWqyr5gpKPWrnnVv8ObX2A!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
    • Is It a Palm Seed?
      By PalmTreeDude
      I found this seed in Florida and am wondering if it looks like a palm seed. I don't know if it will grow or not but I'm going to try to germinate it, whatever it is. 

    • Florida Palms! (West Palm Beach Area)
      By PalmTreeDude
      I am currently in Florida (West Palm Beach area). I am making this thread to share a lot of the palms that I see. Most of these palms are pretty common (especially to people who live in Florida). So here they are. I will post new pictures on this thread over time. 

    • Phoenix canariensis seems to be dying!
      By Donatasgem
      Hi all,
      I recently bought a  Phoenix canariensis  (Canary Date palm) from a local store (B&Q in the UK). It was reduced in price as some of the leafs were already dead. Anyway, I chopped off the dead leaves and left the green ones on, then planted it outside in a warm, sheltered spot (we have had a hot summer here in the UK this year) but it does not seem to be doing anything at the moment, I am not even sure whether it is still alive or not. I did read somewhere that sometimes the plant can be dead but the leafs still remain green for a while. I do water it every day now, it is in a good draining soil too. 
       
      See the picture on what you guys think!
       
      thank you 


    • Australian Palms In Habitat?
      By PalmTreeDude
      Do any Australians (or people who visited Australia) on the forum have any pictures of some Australian palms in habitat? I know there are scattered pictures around the forum but I thought I should make a thread specifically about them. Please post your pictures if you have any. Also, what are the cold hardiest Australian palms?