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Pal Meir

I just found this link with pics of L insigne near Teresópolis/RJ (and not from ES as usual), also published at Palmpedia. I guess that the photo in Henderson et al. 1995, plate 32 #4 (as L weddellianum) may be also from this location:

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/20497-brazil-2009-a-prelude-to-the-2010-biennial/#comment-343028

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Pal Meir

Silvery underside of the first pinnate leaf (#10):

57eae82ebe6a9_N14012016-09-27IMG_9040.th

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Pal Meir

Lytocaryum insigne Repotting?
If your L insigne was potted in a Ø14.8xH17.4 cm plastic pot and the roots are growing out of the bottom holes (pic #1) you should consider repotting it coming spring. I recommend for the 3rd year a soil mix consisting of 2/5 Seramis + 2/5 fine pine bark + 1/5 LECA + 1-2 cm LECA on the bottom of the pot (pic #2). The pots I was using for the 1st year had the measures 8x8xH9 cm, for the 2nd year Ø14.8x17.4 cm, and now as next I use pots with 18x18xH22.5 cm (inner) / 20x20xH23 cm (outer) (pic #3). Whereas one pot has four holes on the bottom a second one without holes serves as saucer (pic #4). — I repotted palm N°1404 with its very tightly grown roots (pic #5) already today without waiting for next spring (pic #6).

#1

57fa4511b818c_N14082016-10-09P1020871.th

#2

57fa4524adb93_SoilP102086768.thumb.jpg.d

#3

57fa452fa9404_PlasticPots3xP1020873.thum

#4

57fa453a9e73c_PlasticPotP1020872.thumb.j

#5

57fa4545793cc_N14042016-10-09P1020866.th

#6

57fa454eacb23_N14042016-10-09P1020869.th

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Josh76

Looking good @Pal Meir! I'll wait until the Spring to pot mine up. Any reason for the double-pot in the final pic?

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Pal Meir
11 minutes ago, Josh76 said:

Looking good @Pal Meir! I'll wait until the Spring to pot mine up. Any reason for the double-pot in the final pic?

The second (outer) pot without any holes functions as saucer; cf. pic #4.

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Pal Meir

@Josh76 This is the purpose of the double pots (N°1401 was already repotted on 2016-08-24):

57fb6a4d5df08_N1401042016-10-10P1020879.

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Pal Meir

Are these brownish silvery scales (from the rachis) on the upper side of the leaflets a characteristic feature of L insigne? :huh:

58066fb32e2d6_N14012016-10-18IMG_9060.th

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Pal Meir

Autumn 2016:

581497de1c53f_N14012016-10-29P1020955.th

581497e35ff0b_N14012016-10-29P1020956.th

And some infos for all who are wondering when their L insigne might become pinnate, here the data of the first pinnate frond: N°1401 – 10th leaf; N°1402 – 11th leaf; N°1404 – 10th leaf; (N°1405 – 8th leaf;) N°1408 – 9th leaf. So please be patient, if your palm has still only strap leaves!

 

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Sanips
On 18/10/2016 20:55:10, Pal Meir said:

Are these brownish silvery scales (from the rachis) on the upper side of the leaflets a characteristic feature of L insigne? :huh:

58066fb32e2d6_N14012016-10-18IMG_9060.th

Finally did you find out something about this characteristic?

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Pal Meir
1 hour ago, Sanips said:

Finally did you find out something about this characteristic?

The leaves of the two L insigne posted by @Alberto on 2015-11-07 show the same pattern. That’s all … :mellow:

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LJG
On 10/18/2016, 11:55:10, Pal Meir said:

Are these brownish silvery scales (from the rachis) on the upper side of the leaflets a characteristic feature of L insigne? :huh:

58066fb32e2d6_N14012016-10-18IMG_9060.th

My Hoehnei has this too. 

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Pal Meir
31 minutes ago, LJG said:

My Hoehnei has this too. 

Thank you for this info. Could you post a pic of your L hoehnei and if possible also of those leaf details?

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LJG

Best I could do in rain. Also this plant is jammed in with tons of other plants.

 

IMG_5744.JPG

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Pal Meir
8 hours ago, LJG said:

Best I could do in rain. Also this plant is jammed in with tons of other plants.

Thanks for posting. It seems to have a similar pattern: the more scales on the rachis the more distinctive appearing.

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Laaz

Just checked my Hoehnei and don't see them...

bj5ulu.jpg

 

 

 

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Pal Meir
1 hour ago, Laaz said:

Just checked my Hoehnei and don't see them...

The pattern on L hoehnei seems to be not so distinct as on L insigne:

58174f58a4006_Lhoehneibj5ulu.thumb.jpg.c

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LJG
5 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

The pattern on L hoehnei seems to be not so distinct as on L insigne:

58174f58a4006_Lhoehneibj5ulu.thumb.jpg.c

Nope. Not even close. Also the tomemtum falls off quicker on Hoehnei. But at these smaller sizes, Insigne has much more tomemtum anyway - so this makes sense. 

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Pal Meir
21 hours ago, LJG said:

Nope. Not even close. Also the tomemtum falls off quicker on Hoehnei. But at these smaller sizes, Insigne has much more tomemtum anyway - so this makes sense. 

L insigne seems to be the most tomentose Lytocaryum species, here the hairy tip of the newest leaf:

5818d725caa22_N14012016-11-01P1020980.th

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Sanips
3 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

L insigne seems to be the most tomentose Lytocaryum species, here the hairy tip of the newest leaf:

5818d725caa22_N14012016-11-01P1020980.th

I'm going to call it 'the hipster palm' :floor:

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Pal Meir

Are these hairy tips of the pinnae characteristic to L insigne? (What about L hoehnei?)

582f0adb5c23b_N14012016-11-18P103001519.

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Alberto

Tomorrow Ill make a pic of both leaves

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Pal Meir

Lytocaryum is the most tomentose subgenus of Syagrus, but within this subgenus Lytocaryum insigne seems to have more tomentum than the other three species, as example here showing the woolly red-brown leaf sheaths:

583ed9ebdb1b1_N14012016-11-30P1030049.th

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Pal Meir

Finally the old Ø14.8×H17.4cm pots became too tight and the soil couldn’t keep enough water even for one day because the root system was so strong. So I had to repot the remaining two L insigne1402 and N°1408, too.

The tight roots:

5842e0f987a6f_N14022016-12-03P1030059.th

5842e1030670e_N14082016-12-03P103006364.

 

Repotted in (inside) 18×18×H23cm pots:

5842e12362952_N14022016-12-03P1030060.th

5842e12907b37_N14082016-12-03P1030065.th

 

Now happy indoors on the window sill, together with N°1404: :)

5842e149a2920_N1402-082016-12-03P1030067

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Pal Meir

New tomentose spear (leaf #12):

587a2b1fda64b_N14012017-01-14P1030284.th

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Josh76

Looks beautiful @Pal Meir. I'm hoping mine will go pinnate in 2017 :D

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Pal Meir
20 minutes ago, Josh76 said:

Looks beautiful @Pal Meir. I'm hoping mine will go pinnate in 2017 :D

Here the list of the first pinnate leaves: N°1401 – #10; N°1401 – #11; N°1404 — #10; (N°1405 – #8;) N°1408 – #9. So I guess the first leaf going pinnate might be #10±1:)

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Pal Meir

@Josh76 Here two old photos of the 10th leaf of N°1401: When you can see this pattern on the backside of a new leaf/spear you can be sure that those parts will go pinnate.

587a4e8b83c39_N14012016-06-28P1010922.th

587a4e9273df1_N14012016-07-21IMG_8834.th

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gyuseppe

Pal  to me , not   pinnate leaves, I noticed that this summer has not grown much, this species does not like the heat of meditteraneo, I also noticed that in winter is ok at home, in front of a stained glass window, but in a room without heating

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Pal Meir

Spear (leaf #12) unfolding after a shower: :o

588be90803bb3_N14012017-01-28P1030318.th

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Pal Meir

Nice pinnate leaves :) and heavily damaged strap leaves :bemused::

58933b21d1072_N14012017-02-02P1030349.th

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Pal Meir

Here an update of the three smaller L insigne with very loooooong old strap leaves and new leaves becoming pinnate:

5896074490a74_N140204082017-02-04IMG_913

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Pal Meir

Happy birthday, N°1401! :greenthumb::)

58a2f985e05c6_N140120151617-02-14.thumb.

58a2f98d31838_N14012017-02-14P1030363.th

58a2f99507f1b_N14012017-02-14P1030364.th

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Pal Meir

And after a frosty February night a bath in full sunshine (16.8°C / 29.3% RH): :D

58a31314807c0_N14012017-02-14P1030365.th

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Pal Meir

Leaf #12 will become entirely finely pinnate, very similar to L weddellianum, but much thicker and stronger:

58a4594d43ae8_N14012017-02-15P1030366.th

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edric

I see it's about time to get caught up on this thread, thanks for all your hard work Jens, Ed

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Pal Meir

Happy birthday, N°1404! :) – The blade of the last strap leaf (leaf #9) is 82 cm long.

58b1cc9e166a9_N14042017-02-25P1030383.th

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Flow

Way to go for mine! It is not very fast but I suppose that's because it doesn't receive the excellent care you give yours. But still, I am happy it is alive:-).IMG_3541.thumb.jpg.1c409753fdca523d21585

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