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Stripped down Windmill

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Here are two Windmill palms for comparison purposes that are showing a non fibrous trunk. One has intentionally had the older petiole bases removed, the other has decayed and have fallen, picked by nesting birds and only cleared to clean up the untidiness. The ones purposely removed show coloring of blues and yellow even after a year or two of being removed. Naturally fallen ones have a more plain look. I've seen it stated that removing the petioles and fiber in the colder range of these palms is not recommended. I've seen some local palms that are stripped heavily showing a smooth look and overall different appearance to this palm.

Observations and comments welcome.

Cheers, Barrie.

 

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Edited by Las Palmas Norte
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Looks nice but is that roots showing at the bottom of the trunk on the last picture?

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Yes, roots emerge on older palms and quite often are exposed like that. You can also see the same in the first palm.

Edited by Las Palmas Norte
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Nice palms! I like seeing them with no fiber, they look more tropical.

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I have a chamaerops with nearly 2 foot of trunk but its a fat trunk shows a bit of roots so your reason means my chammy is old and so is your windmill.

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Go look at most mature Canary Island or True Date Palms in California with 40+ foot high trunks and you will invariably notice the exposed roots at the bottom of the trunk. This is very common on mature palms.

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Very common with washintonia's as well.

 

27zclle.jpg

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When the Trachies are growing in their habitats or locations where they are naturalized they all show only smooth trunks when those are tall:

57700f87ab8c4_Trachycarpusfortunei1979-0

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I love them when they get all like that.  The have an almost striking resemblance to Washingtonia when old and tall like that, right down to the small skirt of dead fans.  

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I like them with or without fibres. I think they look more tropical without.

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