Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Stripped down Windmill

10 posts in this topic

Here are two Windmill palms for comparison purposes that are showing a non fibrous trunk. One has intentionally had the older petiole bases removed, the other has decayed and have fallen, picked by nesting birds and only cleared to clean up the untidiness. The ones purposely removed show coloring of blues and yellow even after a year or two of being removed. Naturally fallen ones have a more plain look. I've seen it stated that removing the petioles and fiber in the colder range of these palms is not recommended. I've seen some local palms that are stripped heavily showing a smooth look and overall different appearance to this palm.

Observations and comments welcome.

Cheers, Barrie.

 

T.fort004.jpg

T.fort003.jpg

T.fort002.jpg

T.fort001.jpg

Edited by Las Palmas Norte
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks nice but is that roots showing at the bottom of the trunk on the last picture?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, roots emerge on older palms and quite often are exposed like that. You can also see the same in the first palm.

Edited by Las Palmas Norte
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice palms! I like seeing them with no fiber, they look more tropical.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a chamaerops with nearly 2 foot of trunk but its a fat trunk shows a bit of roots so your reason means my chammy is old and so is your windmill.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go look at most mature Canary Island or True Date Palms in California with 40+ foot high trunks and you will invariably notice the exposed roots at the bottom of the trunk. This is very common on mature palms.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very common with washintonia's as well.

 

27zclle.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When the Trachies are growing in their habitats or locations where they are naturalized they all show only smooth trunks when those are tall:

57700f87ab8c4_Trachycarpusfortunei1979-0

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love them when they get all like that.  The have an almost striking resemblance to Washingtonia when old and tall like that, right down to the small skirt of dead fans.  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like them with or without fibres. I think they look more tropical without.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • Big Archontophoenix in Northern California
      By Patrick
      https://www.google.com/maps/@37.9795898,-121.7848433,3a,28.5y,232.41h,89.23t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s_ueSU-YWHi2dUyerAe3Ibw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
       
      Hello all, I saw this tree from the main road yesterday and had to Go back to Google to find it. It's pretty darn big and probably one of if not THE only Arch. in the city. They usually struggle and flounder up here. Winters in this area are just a bit too cold and wet and they just barely get going again by the end of summer.
      This picture is probably 3 or 4 years old and It's probably about 18' total height at this point. What's even more impressive to me is that this palm is on the NORTH side of the house so it's definitely seen some cold weather.
       
      I know, it's a pretty common item to all the folks south of here and in the western bay area (the "real" bay area) but it's unique out here. I think I'm going to ask if I can take some seed if it's available. Curious if this might be one of Inge Hoffman's "kids"?

       
      I sure hope they don't do like the La Quinta Coconut to this one....
    • At what age do Sabal palmetto flower/seed?
      By PalmatierMeg
      I've been wondering: at approximately what age or stage does Sabal palmetto start to seed?
      I've got a number of Sabal species growing on my lot, including maritima, causiarum, etonia, miamiensis, domingensis, minor bermudana, brazoria, guatemalensis and, of course, half a dozen palmettos, both normal and Lisas. A number of them, i.e., causiarum, domingensis, miamiensis, etonia, maritima, bermudana and minor, have been flowering/seeding for the past several years. And I remove their flower stalks each year so I'm not inundated with seeds.
      But even though my palmettos are among the oldest Sabals I have, not one has ever flowered. This year looks to be no different.
      So, I wonder, at what age/stage does a palmetto begin to flower and set seed? Do I have hope for that event in my lifetime?
    • Three Sabal palms in Seattle
      By Palm crazy
      Not my photo but found on the web. This garden in West Seattle is famous for its Sabal etonia, S. causarium, and S. minor. 
       
       

    • Nannorrhops ritchiana in Wichita
      By jfrye01@live.com
      I'm pleased to say this Nannorrhops ritchiana growing in downtown Wichita is still alive! I've been checking up on it all winter, and I was almost certain it was dead. I took a close look today, it is pushing out new growth! Check it out! Planted in a bed a few feet from a plate glass window, but no protection other than the building. 
      -Jacob 

    • Trachycarpus in DC
      By PaddyM
      Wanted to share the below pic. I was in DC two weeks ago, right after that brutally cold week we had in the Northeast. I saw this house in the DuPont area with two fine looking Trachy palms. Looking good!