Trachycarpus 'Manipur'

30 posts in this topic

Getting this beauty next week(one on left) and was wondering if anyone here had any growing experience with this palm long term.  While I have 7 T. Fortunei in the ground here in my climate this one will remain potted(into larger one than shown) when I get it.  It has experienced down to 14f in cold frame so far

Anyone have one of these long term?

 

Scott/Omaha USA

 

IMG_5506 (1).JPG

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They are one of the most beautiful Trachys

and quite often overlooked...I don't have any that

size but the very small one I have in the ground has

proved to be quite tough.

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I've got a couple in the ground here in Gainesville, but they obviously haven't been tested as far as cold is concerned.  That's a really nice one there!  They are painfully slow!

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I have one in the ground here.  Seems about as care-free as any other Trachy I have.  Definitely one of the slower ones though.  That's probably good for you, Scott.

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I was given one by another palm enthusiast, a few years ago. Smaller than the  ones you've pictured but should be fine in my 8b garden. I'd like to plant it on out this spring, just have to remember and get to it. Best of luck with yours.

Cheers, Barrie.

Edited by Las Palmas Norte
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22 hours ago, Jimhardy said:

They are one of the most beautiful Trachys

and quite often overlooked...I don't have any that

size but the very small one I have in the ground has

proved to be quite tough.

How many years in the ground Jim?   This one I'm getting will be in 20 gallon container as I really don't have room left around the house for anymore in the ground palms, let along the electricity to over winter them. Maxing out the electrical load on various circuits as it is.

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Just a couple and it is very small but

this year it should produce divided leaves...

 

I have been in the same situation with maxing out electricity...

the solution is more insulation as it takes less heat...

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T. Manipur arrived and much nicer than I could have hoped. Will enjoy a nice sunny spot on back patio with a Mule palm(in corner) and many other species.

For $60 + Shipping couldn't pass it up.

 

 

DSCF0083.JPG

DSCF0084.JPG

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Nice score!

Cheers, Barrie.

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$60 + shipping is a ridiculously good price for a T. 'Manipur' of that size.  SCORE!

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I sure thought so!

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You got a steal!

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Very nice!

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He has more!

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18 minutes ago, sashaeffer said:

He has more!

Unfortunately I'm in England with a postage stamp sized garden

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Manipur is the former inofficial name for the valid ukhrulense. Some people see a greate similarity and perhaps even a conspecific relationship between manipur/ukhrulense, takil and oreophilus. Is there any practical way that we can tell them apart at that size and age?

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1 hour ago, Howeadypsis said:

Unfortunately I'm in England with a postage stamp sized garden

So I would recommend a Trachycarpus bonsaii, which might fit to your postage stamp garden, too :greenthumb::lol: (it is now 13 years old and was last winter all days outdoors; the Ø of the pot is 12 cm):

5752ee564c50c_Twagner2016-06-04P1010705.

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2 minutes ago, Pal Meir said:

So I would recommend a Trachycarpus bonsaii, which might fit to your postage stamp garden, too :greenthumb::lol: (it is now 13 years old and was last winter all days outdoors; the Ø of the pot is 12 cm):

5752ee564c50c_Twagner2016-06-04P1010705.

That looks fantastic 

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Best to plant that bonsai Trachycarpus out in the garden! At a sunny shelterd spot it should do well.

 

Alexander

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1 hour ago, Explorer said:

Best to plant that bonsai Trachycarpus out in the garden! At a sunny shelterd spot it should do well.

 

Alexander

I love it, think it's great

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1 hour ago, Explorer said:

Best to plant that bonsai Trachycarpus out in the garden! At a sunny shelterd spot it should do well.

 

Alexander

No, I won’t plant it in the ground. My aim is to keep it small as long as possible so that I can host it in my green home for further 100 years. All other Trachys I owned got too big and I had to give them away (and most of them died), only two other bonsai Trachys I planted in 2007 resp. 2014 in ground in Heidelberg (cf. Cold Hardy Palms).

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Beautiful!

 

I think this palm will rival Princeps when more

people are growing mature specimens.

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6 hours ago, Jimhardy said:

Beautiful!

 

I think this palm will rival Princeps when more

people are growing mature specimens.

It won't rival princeps here since it is quite a bit less hardy. That said, I've planted one this spring:-). Here it is:

IMG_3299.thumb.jpg.a6320c015f0a9fe726baa

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I think Manipur will surprise people,

esp when those leaves turn white underneath.

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My T. 'manipur' has a very noticeable fluffy brown fuzz, if you will, along the lower petioles. Here it is in a 2 gallon pot, overdue to be planted (this spring). I suspect the crown will widen once it's planted in open ground. Being confined in it's 2 gallon pot limits it's ability to carry lower fronds.

Cheers, Barrie.

 

 

T.manipur01.jpg

T.manipur02.jpg

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Nice one, Barrie.

Mine didn't like its first winter too much but it's alive:

IMG_3604.thumb.jpg.1a5120712a909f24a02b1

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Btw., the absolute low was only around -10C but temperatures in January basically never rose above 0 often staying at -4/-5 during the day, the average mean temperature was -3.

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On 20/03/2017, 5:12:26, Flow said:

Btw., the absolute low was only around -10C but temperatures in January basically never rose above 0 often staying at -4/-5 during the day, the average mean temperature was -3.

Man. They are tough palms then.

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Posted (edited)

Yes but mind you, my waggy still looks pristine and has no scratch while this one is half dead. It is much less hardy tan fortunei/wagnerianus.

Edited by Flow
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I think these are fabulous palms. I've had one planted out for about 5 years. I grew it from seed in about 2004 and it was incredibly slow until it was planted out. Last year it produced about 7-8 leaves and its trunking nicely now. I honestly think this will rival princeps in the coming years. 

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