Rhapis

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@DCA_Palm_Fan It is hard to say which species of Rhapis the smaller one may belong to. For comparison I have attached two further photos of the smaller suckers of my female (β) Rh cochinchinensis/laosensis. — The reduced number of leaflets is normal after the dark season: the more light the more leaflets.

58c2b4e9805f9_Rhapisspb2017-03-10P103040

58c2b4ee51575_Rhapisspb2017-03-10P103040

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@DCA_Palm_Fan Another example for reduction of leaflets from 6 to only 1:

58c2bf0516f3e_Rhapisspa2017-03-10P103041

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2 hours ago, Pal Meir said:

@DCA_Palm_Fan Another example for reduction of leaflets from 6 to only 1:

58c2bf0516f3e_Rhapisspa2017-03-10P103041

Very interesting.   So is this something that is unique to each species?  Or something that is seen across the entire genus?  

 

Any thoughts about the growth rate differences I mentioned and could that be an indicator of a different species? 

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27 minutes ago, DCA_Palm_Fan said:

Very interesting.   So is this something that is unique to each species?  Or something that is seen across the entire genus? 

Any thoughts about the growth rate differences I mentioned and could that be an indicator of a different species? 

A to the last Q: I don’t think so. E.g. the growth rate of suckers from suckers is bigger than the growth of the primary stem from seeds. Generally Rh excelsa and Rh humilis seem to grow quite fast because they are grown in most (or latter in all) cases from suckers.

A to 1st & 2nd Q: This is common to all Rhapis spp.

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