Cold hardy chamaedorea

20 posts in this topic

After radicalis and microspadix what's the next most cold hardy? I want to experiment against the north side of my house under canopy usually 9b but can be 9a some years.

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Probably Chamaedorea cataractarum, they do pretty well in the ground here.

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Chamaedorea pochutlensis will be good for your garden.

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I pretty much exclusively grow chamaedoreas on the north side of my house (w/o canopy) and would definitely say metallica would be the most cold hardy after radicalis and microspadix. the coldest I get is around 32-34F a couple nights per winter.

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I planted half a dozen 5 gal. C. cataractarums and half a dozen 1 gal. C metallicas in 2008. All but one of each died in 2010 (covered) and the other 2 died in 2011. I planted another half a dozen C. cataractarums in spring 2012. Those had about 50% foliage damage in spring 2014 but after 2 growing seasons they have recovered nicely. Another half a dozen 1 gal. Metallics will go into the ground this spring.

C. Cataractarums grow faster with some sun.

2015    30    10a

2014    25    9b

2013    31    10a

2012    31    10a

2011    23    9a

2010    21    9a

2009    27    9b

2008    32    10a

2007    29    9b    

2006    30    10a

Ed in Houston

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14 hours ago, grant b. said:

I pretty much exclusively grow chamaedoreas on the north side of my house (w/o canopy) and would definitely say metallica would be the most cold hardy after radicalis and microspadix. the coldest I get is around 32-34F a couple nights per winter.

I grow Chamaedorea spp also in the nothern part of my garden, nevertheless they need extra shade in summer during the middday. I am also at seaside but I guess the ocean make BIG difference. Look at my costaricana clump below. It is not exposed to afternoon sun but nevertheless scorch signs are there.

Photo0458.thumb.jpg.540cb656f6f47145bf50Photo0459.thumb.jpg.b2fd0d58826414159826

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Ed. my limited experience with metallicas shows that unless they get less than 3 or so hours of sun, they have limited prospects.....however, they grow well in fully shaded spots! Good luck!

 

JC

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I have a 25 gal size potted C. seifrizii on a north facing covered patio

for some 10+ yrs now.  The patio keeps the frost off, but doesn't do

much to abate the cold, which has gotten down to 22F a couple times

during it's tenure.  That combined with the hot summers of central Az

and the low humidity make this a bullet-proof plant here.

Chameadorea_seifrizii.jpg

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Good thread. The seifrezii looks good May try it. Costaricana would be awesome! Does it survive 25 F in Greece?

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I would rank C. radicalis first, then C. microspadix, and C. oreophila as third.

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Any update?!

I'm interested in this genus, but there is very little information about cold hardiness of different Chamaedorea species.

Which would be the most cold hardy after C. radicalis, C. microspadix and C. oreophila?

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I would include C. klotzschiana and plumosa in the discussion.  Radicalis and microspadix are definitely the top 2 in my opinion.  The other 3 are about equal in my experience.

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I have a threesome of Dick Douglas' C. radicalis x C. oreophila hybrid. They saw 15F last year with some magnolia overhead protection.Unscathed and fruiting ever year. Not especially large yet, either. It's been impressive. We just went through 3 days below freezing with a low of 18F. No blemishes.

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2 hours ago, buffy said:

I have a threesome of Dick Douglas' C. radicalis x C. oreophila hybrid. They saw 15F last year with some magnolia overhead protection.Unscathed and fruiting ever year. Not especially large yet, either. It's been impressive. We just went through 3 days below freezing with a low of 18F. No blemishes.

Damn,do you have seeds?

Are you willing to sell a few?

Seems bulletproof here.

 

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Check with Plant Delights Nursery. They sell plants periodically. I'll have some seeds around August. Holler back then.

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Here is a list of my Chamy's that survived the 07 freeze with night temps dipping to the twenties for a week here in Whittier barrio loco.

Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti
Chamaedorea cataractarum
Chamaedorea elegans
Chamaedorea klotzschiana
Chamaedorea macrospadix
Chamaedorea metallica
Chamaedorea radicalis
Chamaedorea seifrizii
Chamaedorea tepejilote

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On 1/10/2018, 10:50:34, buffy said:

I have a threesome of Dick Douglas' C. radicalis x C. oreophila hybrid. They saw 15F last year with some magnolia overhead protection.Unscathed and fruiting ever year. Not especially large yet, either. It's been impressive. We just went through 3 days below freezing with a low of 18F. No blemishes.

If you've got 3 of them you likely have male and female, but do you have other Chamaedoreas that might be unintentionally adding some pollen to the mix?  Regardless, if you get viable seeds they should be interesting and cold hardy!  :)   I'm amazed at how young/small the Chamy's start flowering.  My C. microspadix I grew from seed 2 years ago has started flowering already and I haven't even put it in the ground yet!  But the only way I'll get seed is if I keep it near my potted C. cataractum and they are different sexes.  Time will tell...

Jon

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I have Chamaedorea pochutlensis, and it was was proven to be quite hardy in my climate.

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On 13/1/2016, 4:53:23, Tropicdoc said:

Good thread. The seifrezii looks good May try it. Costaricana would be awesome! Does it survive 25 F in Greece?

I just saw the question, so better late (the answer) than never. Since my plant had been levelled to the ground by the 2004 cold spell with a min of 28F, having servived only the rhizome, I feel bound to predict that a 25F under same circumstances would be fatal. During same event seifrizii had perished completely. 

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On 1/14/2018, 2:42:55, Phoenikakias said:

I just saw the question, so better late (the answer) than never. Since my plant had been levelled to the ground by the 2004 cold spell with a min of 28F, having servived only the rhizome, I feel bound to predict that a 25F under same circumstances would be fatal. During same event seifrizii had perished completely. 

Thanks. That means it’s a no go here.

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