W. filifera in Albuquerque

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I wish you luck Daniel! I'm jealous of the CIDP I see in photos from London, they don't stand a chance here even with my dry cold... 

What part of England are you located in? Which Washingtonia have you tried so far, and what do you plan to try?

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@Daniel There are a lot of factors that allow palms in the desert southwest to survive extremely low temperatures other than lack of humidity and precipitation.  Growing up two cloudy days in a row was a rarity in New Mexico and the winter solar radiation of West Texas, NM and AZ allows the trunks of the palms to actually warm despite single digit temperatures throughout the day. This last factor was brought to my attention by a fellow PalmTalker a few years ago, but makes perfect sense. I'd give them all the credit if I could remember whom it was. A few days ago even when we were in the 20's here in Dallas the trunk of my large butia and sabals were warm to the touch.

 

See the source image

World Solar Insolation Map

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6 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

@Daniel There are a lot of factors that allow palms in the desert southwest to survive extremely low temperatures other than lack of humidity and precipitation.  Growing up two cloudy days in a row was a rarity in New Mexico and the winter solar radiation of West Texas, NM and AZ allows the trunks of the palms to actually warm despite single digit temperatures throughout the day. This last factor was brought to my attention by a fellow PalmTalker a few years ago, but makes perfect sense. I'd give them all the credit if I could remember whom it was. A few days ago even when we were in the 20's here in Dallas the trunk of my large butia and sabals were warm to the touch.

 

See the source image

World Solar Insolation Map

Joseph, I think it was Jwitt who pointed this out. I learned from this that warming the trunk during subZero periods here is enough to make them survive easily. Even around here, with cool summertemps, filibustas grow a new crown after defoliation. I think washingtonia is the perfect and probably the only genus that can take this yearly.

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On 1/3/2018, 7:04:57, ChrisA said:

I wish you luck Daniel! I'm jealous of the CIDP I see in photos from London, they don't stand a chance here even with my dry cold... 

What part of England are you located in? Which Washingtonia have you tried so far, and what do you plan to try?

Thank you, Chris. 

I live near the South coast of England, so can have -6c as an occasional low most Winters. And frost is almost always coupled with high humidity. For example, tonight it is +3c but humidity is 99%. 

I have tried Robusta, Filibusta and Filifera at various times in the past, but will try them all again until I find one that is happy in my garden. A couple of miles away right on the coast, they grow very well and I wonder if it is the higher nighttime temperatures in the Summer or the higher Winter lows that are making the difference (or it could be both).

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How did the washingtonia fare this winter? My filibusta is coming back nicely hete in Amsterdam, after complete defoliation. We had around -8,5C for a minimum but several below freezing days and snow 

E866FCC9-07ED-45E1-A95F-98FCD2B68A44.jpeg

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Hello Axel!

 

Your filibusters looks to be growing back at a quick rate!  It is amazing that they can defoliate completely and return. Your low was only a bit higher than mine for this past winter.  Here in Albuquerque we had extremely dry weather through fall and winter.  The dryness allowed the temps to plummet well below freezing nearly every night between early December and early February. The daytime highs made up for the extreme lows and allowed the palm to not take on too much damage. There were no days with highs below 40 degrees Farenheit. 

Here is the breakdown from my home weather station.  The high temps are skewed a bit higher than they should be due to the weather station not being shaded from the sun.

December 2017: Average High: 60.5F Average Low: 23.1F |  Highest Temp: 71 on 12/3  Lowest Temp: 16 on 12/8. | Precip: 0.0 inches

    Days With Highs:                           Nights With Lows:

     > 70:       1                                     > 40:        0

60 - 69:       16                                    30 - 39:   4

50 - 59:       11                                    20 - 29:  18

40 - 49:        2                                     < 20:       8

January 2018: Average High: 58.4F Average Low: 23.1F | Highest Temp: 71 on 1/31  Lowest Temp: 14 on 1/17 and 1/23 | Precip: 0.0 inches

  Days With Highs:                           Nights With Lows:

     > 70:       1                                     > 40:        1

60 - 69:        13                                  30 - 39:    3

50 - 59:       14                                    20 - 29:  20

40 - 49:        3                                     < 20:       7

February 2018: Average High: 64.3F Average Low: 30.5F | Highest Temp: 76 on 2/1 Lowest Temp: 17 on 2/26 | Precip: 0.2 inches

  Days With Highs:                           Nights With Lows:

     > 70:          7                                  > 40:       2 

60 - 69:          14                                 30 - 39:   15

50 - 59:         7                                  20 - 29:     10

40 - 49:           0                                  < 20:       1

 

Next to come is a photo taken on this cool and cloudy morning.

Cheers,

Chris

 

 

 

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4/21/2018:

0CE5CA0F-60C4-4ED6-87DA-0BA94A204CDB.jpeg

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Trunk view (flowering shrub next to the trunk is Texas Mountain Laurel “Silver Peso” Sophora secundiflora):

BA0D56C3-A673-44ED-A3FA-13DE8AF26E02.jpeg

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thanks Chris, I think the subfreezing days destroyed my fronds, your fronds look great.

I hope mine will turn out like yours. Mine has the same large fronds and long petioles like yours. 

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Chris, That filibusta is doing great repeated mid teen’s and all! 

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