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Pushing the zone with Rainbow eucalyptus

50 posts in this topic

I have heard these trees do not do well in high winds.  Always loved the tree but I am not willing to have a monster, that it can become, fall and crash onto my home during a hurricane.  Way too many of those seem to hit us in SW Fl since Charley in 04.  Always wanted one but...

 

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On 7/9/2018, 8:43:20, Opal92 said:

I saw the same tree at the Dole Pineapple plantation back in 2007- that's where I first discovered them, one of the best examples there. When I and my family were visiting in Aug that year, Hurricane Flossie was off to the southeast and creating high winds over Oahu- we were on a garden tour at the Pineapple plantation and there was a gust of wind. Branch snapping could be heard from the rainbow eucalyptus and the tour guide ushered people away from the tree. 

Just like I said...not good in high winds.

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2 hours ago, Cape Garrett said:

Just like I said...not good in high winds.

I had 2 of them in my yard during Irma, one was 25' and the other 15' and no issues at all except some small branched broken. I recorded 109 mph winds.  It did surprise me as I thought they would be more damaged, but my neighbors queen palm next to my larger rainbow went down but the rainbow did great.

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2 hours ago, Palmaceae said:

I had 2 of them in my yard during Irma, one was 25' and the other 15' and no issues at all except some small branched broken. I recorded 109 mph winds.  It did surprise me as I thought they would be more damaged, but my neighbors queen palm next to my larger rainbow went down but the rainbow did great.

I would be more concerned as a larger tree...there is a reason we don't see these too often in south FL...just not willing to take that chance

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15 hours ago, Cape Garrett said:

I have heard these trees do not do well in high winds.  Always loved the tree but I am not willing to have a monster, that it can become, fall and crash onto my home during a hurricane.  Way too many of those seem to hit us in SW Fl since Charley in 04.  Always wanted one but...

 

Amen, Garrett. Our two large ones came crashing down in Hurricane Irma. Fortunately, they damaged only palms (Coccothrinax) beneath them because they were far from the the house. If they'd been on our two lot site they would have taken out the house. Those things scare me now. My husband insisted on replacing one of them even though the woman at the nursery confirmed they don't do well in storms. 

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We still have several mature and extremely tall rainbow eucs in Naples where we got slammed worse than Lee County by Irma. My 20 footer that Irma snapped in half under the canopy has already tripled in Post-Irma height. :wub:

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19 hours ago, Missi said:

We still have several mature and extremely tall rainbow eucs in Naples where we got slammed worse than Lee County by Irma. My 20 footer that Irma snapped in half under the canopy has already tripled in Post-Irma height. :wub:

Meg lost both of hers to Irma in Lee county.  I suggest if anyone plants these, keep them far away from your home as possible.  I won't risk it.  Been through 3 too many hurricanes since 04.  I know what can happen to those trees.

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3 hours ago, Cape Garrett said:

Meg lost both of hers to Irma in Lee county.  I suggest if anyone plants these, keep them far away from your home as possible.  I won't risk it.  Been through 3 too many hurricanes since 04.  I know what can happen to those trees.

I was lucky with mine, but when I moved I did plant another one but it is way away from the house. I just love the trees, not only for their trunk color but the speed of growth, as I have no shade again at my new garden.

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There's no way I would plant a species of eucalyptus tree where the mature height could reach one's house (or anything else of value to them) if (and when) it get's toppled by high winds. I grew three Eucalyptus grandis trees from one gallon size that were given to me as left over trees, used here in Highlands County as test for possible bio fuel (since they grow so fast and don't require much, if any care). I planted these trees in July of 2011. By last year they were the tallest trees on my property. Fastest trees I ever grew. But with the fast growth comes weak structural integrity. 

Two of my Eucs were blown over by Hurricane Irma. The wind came from the southeast, and the tallest tree fell towards my house, but just barely reached my main front yard. The other fell across my driveway and totally blocked it (photo 1 below).  The one that fell to my front yard (Photo 2 below) completely died, but the other one sprouted limbs from around the stump, and these limbs must have grown 10-15 feet in just six months.

My other euc that didn't blow down suffered some limb damage but since then has completely recovered. Luckily, this tree is 300 feet or more from my house. I used to have a small Eucalyptus deglupta (mostly killed by hard freeze in 2010). This species wasn't as fast growing as E. grandis. I can't recall where I bought my E. deglupta, but I would like to try another one. I know where two mature E. deglupta are, but I haven't seen them since Hurricane Irma. I found these trees almost 20 years ago and had no idea what species they were. All I knew was that they were very cool looking. I think I have photos of them somewhere, and posted them at Palmtalk (plants) 15 years ago or so, and somebody identified them for me.

Eucalyptus grandis 2b.JPG

Eucalyptus grandis 1 base.JPG

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I found the Riverland Nursery in east Ft. Myers sells Rainbow Eucalyptus trees. I will be taking my wife to the airport in Ft. Myers next month, so I will stop buy and pick up a small tree, if they have one. I've stopped by at that nursery many times over the years, as I drive right by it.

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