Jubaea X Butia F3 growth in SE NC

53 posts in this topic

27 minutes ago, petrppetrov said:

Hi Vic,

beautiful palm with nice color .

Can you name for me the Trachycarpus species on the left,magnificent plant.

 

The Trachycarpus to the left of the hybrid is latisectus

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Hi Vic,

truly a very nice plant. I love the hybrids with Jubaea, Butia and especially Syagrus. But it's hard to find seeds or seedlings in Europe.

You have to be lucky for such a beautiful plant.

Eckhard

 

 

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Not looking so hot.  95% brown (at least)

IMAG0567.thumb.jpg.ca94443b06d62bf9017ca

Lost another emerging frond....  I'm hitting it with the H202, and hoping it will manage to push out some leaves.  With the slow growth of this plant, it will look a little sad for a while if it pulls through...  Might be a fresh spot open this year.

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Any updates on this?  I am hopeful for the cocosoid hybrids in this area.

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On 4/15/2018, 6:54:20, frienduvafrond said:

Any updates on this?  I am hopeful for the cocosoid hybrids in this area.

No signs of growth yet, but still has a little bit of green in a frond or two.  I have gone through a few bottles of H202, and there is no funk coming from the hole where the newest fronds used to be...  Even my large Butia looks awful and hasn't pushed any new growth according the sharpie lines I drew on the spear. 

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Hope it pulls through for you, but no growth by April seems like a bad sign.  Most of my Butia and Trachycarpus ended up with major spear damage, but have pushed about 3-4" so far despite the cool spring weather.

Steve

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I started in with some trunk cutting, because it wasn't looking promising.  I'm pretty sure the meristem is toast, well more like a gross white soup.  RIPIMAG0765.thumb.jpg.36c23ccfdf755c293fb3d 

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7 hours ago, Joe NC said:

I started in with some trunk cutting, because it wasn't looking promising.  I'm pretty sure the meristem is toast, well more like a gross white soup.  RIPIMAG0765.thumb.jpg.36c23ccfdf755c293fb3d 

I'm sorry to hear that. What a terrible Winter for everyone. RIP

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I guess we’ll be switching to junipers and boxwoods. :sick:

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On 5/7/2018, 9:30:09, Brad Mondel said:

I guess we’ll be switching to junipers and boxwoods. :sick:

My nightmares are filled with Knockout roses and Bradford pears.  Even worse are all the smug people who tell me "palms don't belong here anyway".  I usually respond with something about Asian azaleas and crape myrtles, vs two Sabal species actually being native.  Every time one of my pinnate experiments fails, my trachycarpus army just grows larger.  I'm up to 18 in the ground with many more new recruits growing from seed.

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On 5/9/2018, 8:00:26, Joe NC said:

My nightmares are filled with Knockout roses and Bradford pears.  Even worse are all the smug people who tell me "palms don't belong here anyway".  I usually respond with something about Asian azaleas and crape myrtles, vs two Sabal species actually being native.  Every time one of my pinnate experiments fails, my trachycarpus army just grows larger.  I'm up to 18 in the ground with many more new recruits growing from seed.

This statement kills me everytime! Even got it bad from a local nursery and she even called me a bold face liar til I showed her pictures and she then called me crazy and walked away. Anyways sorry to hear about your palm.

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I know we don't always get to choose our geography -- the reality of jobs, family, etc. may locate us in a less than ideal growing zone.  But in terms of Georgia and South Carolina and parts of North Carolina, when I studies the weather records it seems the 'Fall Line' cities are very capable of sustaining the cold hardy pinnate palms (Jubaea x Butia under discussion).  It's not that points north and west can't work but then at least being on the southeast side of 'urban heat' and or micro-climate protections may be required for long-term survival.  My 2 cents...

fall_line.jpg

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Joe how did the   (BxJ)xJ do?

-RJ

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