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Jubaea x Syagrus growth in 5 1/2 months

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Hello All,

In the spirit of keeping the end of summer chat lively, I thought I would post about my Jubaea x Syagrus that went into the ground here in Houston back on March 14th. I obtained it as a strap leaf plant from Patric in March, and when planted just had one pinnate leaf opening, and a base of the plant no thicker than a magic marker. Since then the palm has thrown pinnate leaf upon pinnate leaf and the base has fattened up to the thickness of a small soup can. No amount of humidity has seemed to bother this guy at all, nor has the Jubaea blood slowed it down at all. This hybrid has actually grown significantly faster than my two Butiagrus hybrids that were put in the ground at similar sizes. Just exceedingly pleased with this hybrid, and excited to see how it handles the upcoming winter.

As a side note, I also do have a Jubaea x Butia that went in the ground here a few months ago as a 15 gallon. Planted in a mound, but it also does not seem bothered by the humidity, but is much, much, much slower than either your standard mule or jubaea x syagrus.

March 14, 2015:

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August 29, 2015:

post-10169-0-46096500-1440874498_thumb.j

Anybody else growing this hybrid along the Gulf Coast, and if so, how are they doing for you, and how have they held up over the winter?

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Consistent with my experience here in NorCal.

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The potted Patric JxS that I have is growing pretty fast; just bout the same speed as similar sized mules. I'm keeping it in a pot and the greenhouse for two more years until it is a burley 20G size before I take the chance to plant it outside.

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I bought the bigger size from Patric about the same time as you. It has seen very high heat and humidity in the screened pool area. This palm has been great so far....growing about as fast as a mule. Will probably put it in the ground when a new garden flowerbed is created in the front driveway area....next summer?post-97-0-51353800-1440888003_thumb.jpgpost-97-0-20130700-1440888066_thumb.jpg

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My JxS is at least 2x or 3x my regular mules. Only BxPJC might be faster here.

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My b x pjc are not really fast here. I want the j x s just because but the growth rate is a plus. Hope Patrick has some come spring

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Ah mazing...

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I want one so bad. Yours looks great!

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An update since we are now 1 year from planting this as a strap leaf.  Trunk fattening and tallest leaves over my head.  By far the fastest growing palm out of about 50 varieties I am growing here in Houston.  My favorite palm by far.  Kept putting out new growth through winter, zero protection (very warm winter though).  Going to be a beast in a year from now.

image.jpeg

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Looking good!  I will have the 2-year update on mine to come in May.

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Man, that's impressive. It looks great!

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Nice...that looks awesome!  Yours definitely has grown faster than the one I have.  I have an update coming but mine has barely grown half of that in roughly the same time.

 

That palm is going to be a monster by the end of this season !

 

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I thought I would provide a couple updates on the progress of this guy, obtained as a strap leaf back in March of 2015.   First is an update from June 11th, 2016.  You will notice the view around the palm has changed considerably.  I moved (now in Magnolia, TX.. about 40 Miles Northwest of Houston, Zone 9A... barely).  Ended up digging this guy rather hastily out of the ground, and kept it sitting in a pot, crooked for about a month waiting to move. Then took it on a 30 mile roadtrip in the back of a pickup truck at highway speed to its new home resulting in it being severely bent and losing several roots (forgive me, I was hauling a few truck loads that I dug out!).  After that royal beatdown I plopped it in the sunniest location in the backyard at the start of June, and that is what you see here.  Staked and tied because it wouldn't stand straight after that trip down the highway.

5E73EB71-3694-43EC-9A71-3AE7350B1099.JPG

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Now to update to today.   The palm has been back in the ground now for 6 months and much to my surprise, has recovered nicely and has probably thrown out 6-8 or so new fronds (maybe more?) in that time. In addition, the base of the palm has started to do what Jubaeas do...thicken up.  When put back in the ground in June the base was about the diameter of a beer bottle.  Now I would say it is a little larger than a 2 liter soda bottle and growing rapidly.  The height of the tallest frond is now over my head, so a little taller than 6 feet overall.

As far as the care it has gotten... basically just a nice ring of compost around it, and regular applications of PalmGain throughout the hot summer months, along with weekly watering when highs were consistently in the mid 90s or higher.   This palm grew through the worst of the heat, and actually seems to accelerate as the winter chill sets in.  Even though mama is Jubaea, this hybrid does not seem at all bothered by this area's absolutely thick humidity.

Tonight and tomorrow it will face its first real test of cold (last winter didn't even have a frost).  Now it will be up against some upper 20s and wind to go with that.  Everything "should" be fine at those temperatures, but we shall see!

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IMG_0349.JPG

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Mine saw 18 last night in a 15g pot before i pulled it inside at 330am. Yours will be fine. 

14821151513331554704068.jpg

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32 minutes ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Mine saw 18 last night in a 15g pot before i pulled it inside at 330am. Yours will be fine. 

14821151513331554704068.jpg

damn that's cold!!

 

did it get any cold spots?

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2 minutes ago, Josh-O said:

damn that's cold!!

 

did it get any cold spots?

Some parts of the older fronds turned dark green like filifera do, but went back once it thawed out. I left it inside for the rest of the day since we didn't go above 30.  The top inch if the pot was frozen when i dragged it inside. 

Jubaea and JXB looked perfect this morning, but the real story will come at the end of the week when we get back into the 60s. 

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Btw, this was a Patric liner two years ago and would have been MUCH bigger if planted in the ground this last spring.  Its been in that 15g for a year.

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59 minutes ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Btw, this was a Patric liner two years ago and would have been MUCH bigger if planted in the ground this last spring.  Its been in that 15g for a year.

I have two of those in the ground and they are extremely fast growers indeed.

are you gonna plant yours out in the spring?

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9 hours ago, Josh-O said:

I have two of those in the ground and they are extremely fast growers indeed.

are you gonna plant yours out in the spring?

Yes, I brought it over to my house to plant a month ago but didn't get around to it.  Now I need to bring it back to the nursery until the spring.

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12 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Yes, I brought it over to my house to plant a month ago but didn't get around to it.  Now I need to bring it back to the nursery until the spring.

awesome! keep us posted on its growth rate. this is such a fun hybrid to watch grow.

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Update on this one... back in early January this palm took two nights in a row with 19 degree lows, all preceded by freezing rain.  About 36 hours straight below freezing and the frost cloth I covered it with was frozen to the ground.  I thought this palm was safe as it initially showed little foliage damage, but about two weeks later it showed about 50% burn and the spear pulled (spear stunk awful and bugs were already eating away at the rotting innards).  Drastic measures had to be taken, with a routine of hydrogen peroxide and copper fungicide, as well as drilling a hole in the side to drain the new lake that existed where the spear previously was.  I didn’t take a picture at this point, honestly because I was just so depressed and sure I had lost this palm.... then about 4 weeks later, a mangled spear started pushing up.  The following are from late February when it started coming back from the dead.

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The partial spear continued to push up slowly into early April, and then as things warmed up plenty of new growth appeared.  Images here show the first spear pushing up in early April... the next is the flush of new growth by mid July.

26639007-CE57-41B8-A9BB-526C63AD7B2A.jpeg

2F2EAADD-FF8C-449D-98B1-2CF6CBC682A5.jpeg

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And last are the pictures from today... Fully recovered and then some, with the base of the palm doubling in size compared to last fall, and the tallest leaf probably somewhere around 8 feet... also about double where it was last fall.  This continues to be my favorite palm.  Let’s hope for a better winter (though this one probably would have done fine had it not been transplanted right before last winter hit)

8CE5198C-8D44-477C-83B5-E03C12002585.jpeg

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Beautiful palm and amazing recovery:greenthumb:

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I am surprised that two nights of 19 degrees would damage it so much.  Two consecutive nights would not have affected a Butia Odorata. It's almost although this hybrid is more cold-sensitive than its parents. 

As for growth rate, wow!  I can't believe that this tree was a baby two years ago.  That is extremely fast. Now I am wondering if I should have bought one of these Butia x Jubaea hybrids from Patric instead of the Butia Odorata x Parajubaea Cocoides which I ended up buying (after three summer months in a pot, it has grown, but not nearly as much as I was expecting, despite plenty of sun and water; still small).   

Please keep posting photos once every year or two so that we can see this hybrid turn into a mature tree.  Thanks!

 

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4 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

I am surprised that two nights of 19 degrees would damage it so much.  Two consecutive nights would not have affected a Butia Odorata. It's almost although this hybrid is more cold-sensitive than its parents. 

As for growth rate, wow!  I can't believe that this tree was a baby two years ago.  That is extremely fast. Now I am wondering if I should have bought one of these Butia x Jubaea hybrids from Patric instead of the Butia Odorata x Parajubaea Cocoides which I ended up buying (after three summer months in a pot, it has grown, but not nearly as much as I was expecting, despite plenty of sun and water; still small).   

Please keep posting photos once every year or two so that we can see this hybrid turn into a mature tree.  Thanks!

 

I was surprised by the damage as well.   I have 3 odorata in the ground planted last summer as well (at 15 gallon size).  I didn’t protect them at all, and they showed zero burn, but they each did throw one funky looking spear.  A similar sized Eriospatha showed zero damage with no protection.  My mules had a spear pull, but minimal burn.  I think it was far more the freezing rain getting into the crown and then the hard freeze following it that was so damaging, not so much the actual minimum temp.

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18 hours ago, meteorologistpalmguy said:

I was surprised by the damage as well.   I have 3 odorata in the ground planted last summer as well (at 15 gallon size).  I didn’t protect them at all, and they showed zero burn, but they each did throw one funky looking spear.  A similar sized Eriospatha showed zero damage with no protection.  My mules had a spear pull, but minimal burn.  I think it was far more the freezing rain getting into the crown and then the hard freeze following it that was so damaging, not so much the actual minimum temp.

I agree - the freezing rain was most likely the culprit.  What a great palm - I wish all my seedlings showed this growth rate!  :D  Congrats on the recovery - you obviously did the right things!

Jon

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May as well update on this one.  It was a rough winter, but I wasn’t going to take any chances with this palm, so ended up building a tent around it and heated with a couple of heat lamps during the biggest cold blast (two lows of 15, accumulating snow and ice and two days below freezing).  Despite a couple hundred pounds of ice and snow weighting down the roof of the tent/crown of the palm, the tent mostly held up and the palm only saw the slightest of leaf burn.  Some of that burn may also be from several other 25ish lows it saw throughout the winter without protection.   The base of the tree has almost doubled in diameter since last September and the top frond is now probably a bit over 11 feet.  With such minimal setback from winter, it should really explode this summer. Perrier bottle for scale.  

 

Bonus image of my pure bred Jubaea that is ground nearby (planted April of last year).   Really starting to see nice growth on this one and it only has a piece of frost fabric over it during the worst of winter.  So far, no issues with humidity/fungus.

A934767B-377E-4C3D-AD5C-DAE1F02559DA.jpeg

2FBC8DA3-55C0-43F3-AA3C-240C3C75E9DB.jpeg

16325888-EBC1-41DE-9E5E-6216F03AB669.jpeg

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Beautiful! Strong work with the cold protection. I'm going to really up my game this year. I've been really impressed with the pictures and growth rate of this hybrid, hope to be able to get one some day.

The palms you gave me are all doing well, by the way. The C. radicalis never skipped a beat and is already flowering.

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I am envious of your soil around Magnolia. Acidic and sandy loam isnt it? Have you had a soil test or irrigation water test? I know someone there that can grow just about anything, amazing what a few miles does. 

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On 6/9/2018, 12:11:31, meteorologistpalmguy said:

May as well update on this one.  It was a rough winter, but I wasn’t going to take any chances with this palm, so ended up building a tent around it and heated with a couple of heat lamps during the biggest cold blast (two lows of 15, accumulating snow and ice and two days below freezing).  Despite a couple hundred pounds of ice and snow weighting down the roof of the tent/crown of the palm, the tent mostly held up and the palm only saw the slightest of leaf burn.  Some of that burn may also be from several other 25ish lows it saw throughout the winter without protection.   The base of the tree has almost doubled in diameter since last September and the top frond is now probably a bit over 11 feet.  With such minimal setback from winter, it should really explode this summer. Perrier bottle for scale.  

 

Bonus image of my pure bred Jubaea that is ground nearby (planted April of last year).   Really starting to see nice growth on this one and it only has a piece of frost fabric over it during the worst of winter.  So far, no issues with humidity/fungus.

A934767B-377E-4C3D-AD5C-DAE1F02559DA.jpeg

2FBC8DA3-55C0-43F3-AA3C-240C3C75E9DB.jpeg

16325888-EBC1-41DE-9E5E-6216F03AB669.jpeg

 

Its funny seeing someone else build enclosures like that! Palm is looking good!

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Jubaea will never require protection in Magnolia and will grow into a beautiful palm.  There are a few bigger Jubaea in Cleveland and a variety of Jubaea/BJ hybrids on the outskirts of Magnolia at a 250 acre personal botanical garden.  Over the last few years they have planted at least 5000 palms including a few Mules with 25' of trunk. A very conservative estimate of 20 semi loads of palms have been put into the ground there.

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1 hour ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

250 acre personal botanical garden.

:blink: I can only imagine what I'd do with a 250 acre personal garden

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address by chance, want to snoop on google sky view.?

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Yea, I have to remember the name they were using for the place or sit down and retrace it on a map.  It was hidden in the middle of nowhere on a dead end road.

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16 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

I am envious of your soil around Magnolia. Acidic and sandy loam isnt it? Have you had a soil test or irrigation water test? I know someone there that can grow just about anything, amazing what a few miles does. 

It is indeed a sandy loam, very fast draining.  Certainly a departure from the "gumbo" I was used to when I was down in Spring or Rosenberg or really anywhere else in the Houston area.  Have not done a soil test, but certainly would be on the acidic side of things as indicated by the loblolly forest all around me. 

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This is one my 2 Jubaea x Queen. They aren't my fastest palms. Will givr them some extra nutrients this spring.

P_20180628_174430_vHDR_On.jpg

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