Butia x Parajubaea Cocoides

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I had 2 days of winter 25 and wet first night, 26 and dry second night.... no other frosts or freezes

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Tropicdoc and others, how are these hybrids looking going into winter? 

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Hello RJ.  Mine suffered no damage at all (unprotected), and we had the worst freeze in eight years this past January (2018).  The freeze lasted two nights initially and then, a week and a half later, it froze for three nights straight.  The lowest temperature on my property was somewhere in the range of 23-24 Fahrenheit as overnight lows, with the mercury rising only into the fifties in the day time (we should reach almost 70 at that time of year in the afternoon).  In addition, my Butia Odorata x Parajubaea Cocoides was still relatively juvenile at the time.  It is now fully pinnate.

Based on my experience, BxPJC is bulletproof in northeastern Florida and likely also is across the entire northern Gulf of Mexico coast and perhaps as far north as Savannah, Georgia along the Atlantic coast.  That is just a guess though.

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(Continued). RJ, I just noticed that you are in Columbia, South Carolina.  I don't know whether this palm would be fully cold-hardy so far north and inland.  I might have tried one in Charleston, but I am not sure about Columbia.  However, you would know your climate better than I would.
 

I have never seen snow or ice on my property, but you do get a little bit up there, depending on the year, don't you? 

 

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30 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

(Continued). RJ, I just noticed that you are in Columbia, South Carolina.  I don't know whether this palm would be fully cold-hardy so far north and inland.  I might have tried one in Charleston, but I am not sure about Columbia.  However, you would know your climate better than I would.
 

I have never seen snow or ice on my property, but you do get a little bit up there, depending on the year, don't you? 

 

Sandy, 

Yes technically an 8a although the property I purchased a few months ago sits out on a peninsula on lake Murray ( 2nd largest body of water in SC) Although I'm not right on the water the north and north westerly winds of winter have travel over the lake to get to my property. The water on the Lake Murray rarely gets below 50, moderating the nearby climate in the winter significantly. 

 

Nick, the fellow who started this thread purchased one but it appears he no longer in on PT. Ideally his input would be valuable. There is one growing in Charleston that Laaz (Todd) has shown pictures of at his friends house (Doc) that has been in the ground for what appears many years. I've only lived here 3 years and in those 3 years it's snowed once, trace on the grass and it was melted gone in less then an hour after falling.  Although Laaz in Charleston a 9a got much worse weather then we did last year, snow and ice this past winter.

 

I appreciate your input. It seems this hybrid has been around for some time now but not a lot of reports from those grown in the SE US with wet cool winters, certainly not ideal for Parajubaea ssp. 

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Prior to buying B x PJC, I had tried three pure Parajubaeas and none of them seemed to like my climate ---- or to grow, period.  For some reason, the Butia element in B x PJC makes this palm seem at home in my humid, hot climate.  It did not mind my sticky wet summer either.  However, our winters are relatively dry, perhaps unlike yours (?).  If this had been a pure Parajubaea Cocoides, not only would it have disliked my summer humidity and heat, but may not have tolerated the type of cold which I experienced in January 2018.

 

I look forward to the others who respond on this thread about their experiences.

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Sandy, it appears it really is an ideal palm for you as it doesn't have sygarus in it. Ideally reports from folks who have these in the ground and mules in the ground to provide a side by side would be valuable, especially in questionable hardiness zones (8a/b). There are plenty of mules not far from me, but no Parajubaea hybrids that I'm aware of. Mules tend to need early protection around here but after a few years seem to hold their own. Perhaps it's the extra heat we get in the summer that gets them over the hump. We tent to be hotter then Charleston in the summer but cooler in the winter.  

 

There was a gentleman who lived on the lake who had Queens for years, some winters they would make it fine, other winters they would burn and defoliate. Apparently his wife got pretty tired of them looking bad and he finally cut them down a couple years ago. Mind, you, I was told this second hand. 

 

By now there must be some really large ones on the west coast to also give others an idea of that these are looking like as they get larger. Obviously the BxPJ Tort is going to be a large balm but the PJC one would think would have a little more grace and thinner trunk. 

 

 

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Interesting.  I can't compare the hardiness of my B x PJC to a Mule Palm because none of my mule Palms have ever been cold-damaged either.  I wish I could also give you a growth rate comparison, but my B x PJC is too juvenile to know.  It may have been in the ground for a year or less?  (Can't remember).

 

My sense from these past few months, though, is that I won't see the crazy high growth rate for my B x PJC that northern Californias see.  Mine hasn't really grown all that much.... yet, at least.  It needs to get established first. 

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Here’s three of them I protected heavily last year. Just like sandy had ridiculous freeze of 18 degrees and stayed frozen for 2 days. Then you palms got dug up and moved. Don’t plan on protecting every year just if going below 20

1BFE159E-B272-4980-BD35-B069A1DCEECE.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Tropicdoc said:

Here’s three of them I protected heavily last year. Just like sandy had ridiculous freeze of 18 degrees and stayed frozen for 2 days. Then you palms got dug up and moved. Don’t plan on protecting every year just if going below 20

1BFE159E-B272-4980-BD35-B069A1DCEECE.jpeg

Beautiful in so many ways! Any closer up shots? And what is that palm all the way to the right? Is that a small pond in behind the fence? The pool looks fantastic. Perhaps I can pick your brain about pools. We are building a new house and plan on putting a pool in, and I'm considering fiberglass instead of concrete. 

 

 

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Looks like missed that there is 3 of them there. Too late to go back and edit it :rant:

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